Self Memory Nosta...
Follow
Find
311 views | +0 today
Self Memory Nostalgia
Contemporary art research
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

Will augmented reality be the next digital battlefield? : Postnoon

Will augmented reality be the next digital battlefield? : Postnoon | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

On Monday, Microsoft was given a patent on ‘augmented reality’ (AR) glasses that would enhance sports and other live events with streams of information beamed directly in front of the user — even including action replays and lyrics of songs. Google’s Glass Project is already active in this sphere. But what is AR, and will it be the next digital battlefield? We take a look.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
Wildcat2030's comment, December 2, 2012 5:13 AM
sorry , wrong scoop feed..
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Neuron - Opposing Mechanisms Support the Voluntary Forgetting of Unwanted Memories

Alistair Parker's insight:
Voluntarily forgetting is mediated by two opposite mechanismsThese mechanisms recruit distinct PFC systems to either engage or disengage retrievalDLPFC effectively inhibits retrieval processes supported by the hippocampusA cPFC-mid-VLPFC circuit biases retrieval to supplant unwanted memories
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Study: What social media will do to our brains by 2020 | Articles | Home

Study: What social media will do to our brains by 2020 | Articles | Home | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Young people’s minds are being rewired, says a new report. Should you worry?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Memory: The Thread of Life - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Memory: The Thread of Life - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Memory – it’s the thread that runs through our lives. Psychologists are finding that the way we talk with our young children affects their early memories and we hear why we soon forget what we learn when we cram for an exam.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Using the Internet affects your memory, study says | SmartPlanet

Using the Internet affects your memory, study says | SmartPlanet | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Research on the way computer use affects our memories has turned up surprising findings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

PhinisheD

PhinisheD is a discussion and support group for students who cannot seem to finish their dissertations or theses
Alistair Parker's insight:

.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Notability - Unleash Your Note Taking Ability.

Notability - Unleash Your Note Taking Ability. | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Alistair Parker's insight:

Notability powerfully integrates handwriting, PDF annotation, typing, recording, and organizing so you can take notes your way! Discover the freedom to capture ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Andrew Hoskins: The Diffusion of Media/Memory | Complexity | University of Warwick

Andrew Hoskins: The Diffusion of Media/Memory | Complexity | University of Warwick | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Andrew Hoskins: The Diffusion of Media/Memory, complexity...
The Diffusion of Media/Memory: the new complexity

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Brains and Brilliance

Brains and Brilliance | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Where in the brain, exactly, is intelligence? Is a high I.Q. just a result of a flawed test – or do high-I.Q. brains have specific, measurable differences from others? Answers await, Intrepid...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Save As... Digital Memories : Palgrave Macmillan

Save As... Digital Memories : Palgrave Macmillan | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
What is digital memory? How are digital technologies changing what we remember and how? Records of the past used to be expensive and bulky to keep, and difficult to access. But digital media technologies provide cheap data storage and easy data retrieval, with mobile networks enabling unprecedented global accessibility and participation in the creation of memories. Save As… Digital Memories brings together leading international scholars to address on-line memorials, blogging, mobile phones, social networking sites and the digital archive. They focus on topical subjects such the 'war on terror', cyberpunk, the Holocaust, digital remixing and the virtual museum. Trans-disciplinary and original, the book will appeal to those interested in how digital media technologies shape human memory. Providing an accessible and bold introduction to the subject of digital memory, each essay shows how digital technologies are changing human memory discourses, practices and forms, as well as the way we conceptualise memory itself.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Education in the information age: is technology making us stupid?

Education in the information age: is technology making us stupid? | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
The pub argument is dead. Google killed it with a little help from your smartphone.

 

A recent study suggests that our modern lifestyles are making us “less intelligent” than our ancestors, at least at a genetic level. This research echoes concerns Einstein had when he supposedly said,

 

===> “I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.” <===

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://theconversation.edu.au/education-in-the-information-age-is-technology-making-us-stupid-10844

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 2, 2012 6:15 PM
Thanks Gust, great post.
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 11, 2012 9:02 AM
Thank you Alistair and Miuhassan for the visit and rescoop.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Digital Memory
Scoop.it!

Curation: How the Global Brain Evolves | Evolver.fm

Curation: How the Global Brain Evolves | Evolver.fm | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Those who can, do. Those who can’t, review. Those who can’t review, tweet. Those who can’t tweet retweet


Via Cezar
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The Science of Empathy: Mirror Neurons

The Science of Empathy: Mirror Neurons | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
“We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men; and among those fibers, as sympathetic threads, our actions run as causes, and they come back to us as effects.” -Herman Melville Connection.

 

“empathy,” the simple innate ability to “know what it’s like,” to actually understand. But what is it really? How does it work, and where does it come from?

 

The biological basis for empathy lies, like all emotions, in the brain. It might be more appropriate to substitute “synaptic” in lieu of “sympathetic” in Melville’s aforementioned quote, as empathy goes all the way down to the molecular level, generated by special brain cells nicknamed mirror neurons. These neurons were originally referred to as “monkey see, monkey do” neurons after their discovery by a team of researchers at the University of Parma, Italy.

 

by Matthew Garrett


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
Eye of the beholder's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:46 AM

Absolutely revealing.

Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Are You Smarter Than Your Grandfather? Probably Not.

Are You Smarter Than Your Grandfather? Probably Not. | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Senility isn’t the answer; IQ scores are increasing with each generation. In a new book, political scientist James Flynn explains why
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

The cycle path to happiness

The cycle path to happiness | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
You need only look at the physique of Bradley Wiggins to appreciate the potential effects of cycling on the body. But what about the mind?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Welcome to Growing Up in New Zealand

Welcome to Growing Up in New Zealand | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
A longitudinal study of kiwi children from before birth into adulthood.
Alistair Parker's insight:

Approximately 7,000 children and their families are taking part in a study that aims to provide a complete picture of the pathways that lead to successful and equitable child development, therefore improving outcomes for all children - now and into the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Outsourcing memory: the internet has changed how we remember

Outsourcing memory: the internet has changed how we remember | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
When Nicholas Carr’s article “Is Google Making Us Stupid?
Alistair Parker's insight:

When Nicholas Carr’s article “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” hit newsstands in the July/August 2008 edition of The Atlantic, the reaction was predictably vociferous.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

What we can learn from procrastination

What we can learn from procrastination | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Online version of the weekly magazine, with current articles, cartoons, blogs, audio, video, slide shows, an archive of articles and abstracts back to 1925
Alistair Parker's insight:

The baine of my studying life, the baine of my life, period...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Cannabinoid receptors and neurodegenerative diseases - Tanveer - 2012 - Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Membrane Transport and Signaling - Wiley Online Library

Cannabinoid receptors and neurodegenerative diseases - Tanveer - 2012 - Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Membrane Transport and Signaling - Wiley Online Library | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Alistair Parker's insight:

Several neurodegenerative disorders display alterations in components of the cannabinoid system and a cannabinoid-based approach has proven efficacious in the reversal of certain neurodegenerative events. Common features of neurodegenerative diseases include neuronal loss, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation, which can contribute to the disease symptomatology (Figure 1). In this article, three neurodegenerative diseases, namely Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, are discussed in the context of disease-related alterations in the cannabinoid system and the potential benefit that may be achieved by targeting the cannabinoid system to alleviate various features of the pathologies. Although these diseases differ in their etiology, they share certain common features, particularly neuroinflammation and neuronal loss, which the cannabinoid system can impact upon.

  
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Hydra's immortality gene sheds light on human ageing

Hydra's immortality gene sheds light on human ageing | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

The tiny freshwater polyp Hydra is a remarkable creature. It does not show any signs of ageing and appears to be immortal. Researchers from Kiel University have examined this phenomenon and uncovered an important link to the ageing process in humans that could lead to the development of advanced rejuvenation therapies.

 

How does the polyp Hydra do this? It accomplishes the feat of apparent immorality by reproducing through budding rather than mating. Each polyp contains stem cells capable of continuous proliferation. Without this endless supply of regenerating stem cells, the animals could not reproduce.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 5:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 12:06 PM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 31, 2013 2:04 AM

Très intéressant.

Scooped by Alistair Parker
Scoop.it!

Computers that read minds are being developed by Intel - Telegraph

Computers that read minds are being developed by Intel  - Telegraph | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
New technology could allow people to dictate letters and search the internet simply by thinking, according to researchers at Intel who are behind the project.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How Technology Wires the Learning Brain | MindShift

How Technology Wires the Learning Brain | MindShift | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

‘Neural fingerprints’ of memory associations allow ‘mind reading’

‘Neural fingerprints’ of memory associations allow ‘mind reading’ | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Researchers have begun to show that it is possible to use brain recordings to reconstruct aspects of an image or movie clip someone is viewing, a sound someone is hearing or even the text someone is reading. A new study by University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University scientists brings this work one step closer to actual mind reading by using brain recordings to infer the way people organize associations between words in their memories.

 

Epilepsy patients who volunteered for the study while awaiting brain surgery had tiny electrodes implanted in their brains, which allowed researchers to precisely observe electrical signals that would not have been possible to measure outside the skull. While recording these electrical signals, the researchers asked the participants to study lists of 15 randomly chosen words and, a minute later, to repeat the words back in whichever order they came to mind.

 

The researchers examined the brain recordings as the participants studied each word to home in on signals in the participant’ brains that reflected the meanings of the words. About a second before the participants recalled each word, these same “meaning signals” that were identified during the study phase were spontaneously reactivated in the participants’ brains.

 

Because the participants were not seeing, hearing or speaking any words at the times these patterns were reactivated, the researchers could be sure they were observing the neural signatures of the participants’ self-generated, internal thoughts.

 

Critically, differences across participants in the way these meaning signals were reactivated predicted the order in which the participants would recall the words. In particular, the degree to which the meaning signals were reactivated before recalling each word reflected each participant’s tendency to group similar words (like “duck” and “goose”) together in their recall sequence.

 

Since the participants were instructed to say the words in the order they came to mind, the specific sequence of recalls a participant makes provides insights into how the words were organized in that participant’s memory.


Via Xaos, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alistair Parker from Digital Memory
Scoop.it!

Exploiting the Neuroscience of Internet Addiction

Exploiting the Neuroscience of Internet Addiction | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Much of what we do online releases dopamine into the brain's pleasure centers, resulting in obsessive pleasure-seeking behavior. Technology companies face the option to exploit our addictions for profit.

 

In the past, society has been able to put physical barriers in place to make it more difficult to satisfy unhealthy obsessions. For example, gambling casinos were primarily segregated in Nevada. Things are very different today. In the first place, there is no physical barrier between people and the obsession in question. Smartphones and portable electronic devices travel with us in our pockets.

 

There is, of course, no simple solution to this problem. The answer starts with recognizing that our virtual environment has very real consequences. For my own part, I create physical walls around my virtual environment. I will read books and newspapers anywhere in my home on my iPad, but I answer emails only in my office. When I am talking with my wife, listening to my daughters discuss the challenges they face in raising their children, or playing and laughing with my grandsons, I not only shut off my iPhone, I put it out of reach.


Via Cezar
more...
No comment yet.