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Squeezed Britons try their hand at microbusiness to top up incomes

Squeezed Britons try their hand at microbusiness to top up incomes | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Rise in number of people starting new businesses but experts question to what extent startup numbers are measure of economic success
Erika Watson's insight:

Key points:

massive rise in self-employment, replaces most of the jobs lost in the recession.

Suggestion they don't pay as well  (on average true - see other stats)

It's very easy to start a biz in UK, but not to survive. Four in 10 businesses in the UK fail after year three, according to the British Library's Business and IP Centre, which aims to help startups survive. The net rate of business creation in the UK is less than half the European average, according to the auditors RSM.

Over the past five years, the UK has seen a net gain of just 63,000 businesses, an annual compound growth rate of just 0.7%. By contrast, the 12 European countries surveyed posted an average annual compound growth rate of 1.4%. In the fast growing economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – known collectively as the BRICS – the rate is 5.8%.

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Is the rise in self-employment really a Good Thing?

Is the rise in self-employment really a Good Thing? | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Erika Watson's insight:

Guest post by 'Flip chart Rick' uses data to show: 

Self-employment is a feature of poorer countries /  it pays less than employment and half of the self-employed are close to the minimum wage. There is also nothing to suggest that lots of business start-ups will lead to the development of more viable businesses in the future.  

Also concludes that much of the increase is long-term. 

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PCG tells TUC 'self-employment growth is a structural change' - Brookson Ltd

PCG tells TUC 'self-employment growth is a structural change' - Brookson Ltd | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
The PCG has criticised the TUC's assertions that people are being forced into self-employment.
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The UK’s self-employment phenomenon: why the labour market isn’t so strong after all

Morgan Stanley report by Charles Goodhart

Erika Watson's insight:

excellent analysis. Striking diagram of symmetry between increase in older women's self-employment and reduction in retirement age 'inactivity'. 

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Males choose self-employment by choice, women out of financial necessity - ANINEWS

Males choose self-employment by choice, women out of financial necessity - ANINEWS | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Males choose self-employment by choice, women out of financial necessity ANINEWS Self-employment can allow older workers to stay in the labor market longer and earn additional income, yet little research has addressed if reasons for self-employment...
Erika Watson's insight:

Interesting research

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Untold story of the downturn: the shift from paid jobs to self-employment

Untold story of the downturn: the shift from paid jobs to self-employment | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Phillip Inman: The ONS pay figures that George Osborne used to show that disposable incomes are rising excluded self-employed workers
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The Peer Economy Will Transform Work (or at Least How We Think of It)

The Peer Economy Will Transform Work (or at Least How We Think of It) | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
The nature of work is changing, just as it has in the past.

Via jean lievens
Erika Watson's insight:

Excerpt: "

Peer economy providers are also vulnerable but with a crucial factor that makes all the difference: They are a visible workforce, able to make these collective interests heard.

The economy of the future will not be the economy as it is now. The challenge before us is to reimagine what full work means, not based simply on how we’re used to conceiving of it, but based on a consideration of what we deem most valuable (independence, security, connectedness, etc.). "

Lays out the challenge but I'm not sure there is much sign that peer economy providers are either visible or beginning to make collective interests heard.  

The peer economy provides independence, and the contemporary increased security of diversity of income, connectedness. But that security still remains too fragile and shallow for most. 

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Flexicurity for the Self-employed

Flexicurity for the Self-employed | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Flexicurity for the self-employed makes sense. Most new jobs will come from small business, helping them to withstand economic shocks is in all our interests.
Erika Watson's insight:

Just realised I haven't saved any of my own articles in this curation - so here is one. 

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A Way Out Of Europe's Labor Crisis (Part II) : NPR

A Way Out Of Europe's Labor Crisis (Part II) : NPR | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides of the London School of Economics says Denmark's system of "flexicurity is a way to achieve both international competitiveness and a good social state. It offers a clear road map to labor reform.

Via steve batchelder
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We are not the beautiful: "We're facing a shift in what work means and it is this generation that can express this shift." Interview with the group behind the Swiss Basic Income referendum

We are not the beautiful: "We're facing a shift in what work means and it is this generation that can express this shift." Interview with the group behind the Swiss Basic Income referendum | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

Via Khannea Suntzu
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Switzerland Mulls Giving Every Citizen $2800 a Month - Slate Magazine (blog)

Switzerland Mulls Giving Every Citizen $2800 a Month - Slate Magazine (blog) | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog) Switzerland Mulls Giving Every Citizen $2800 a Month Slate Magazine (blog) Earlier this month, an initiative aimed at giving every Swiss adult a "basic income" that would "ensure a dignified existence and participation in the...
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In the New Economy, Everyone Is an Indentured TaskRabbit

In the New Economy, Everyone Is an Indentured TaskRabbit | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

It's not exactly news that in the absence of a solution to the unemployment crisis, Americans have learned to cobble together various odd jobs to replace the full-time, benefits-included positions they once had.

 

What's surprising is how permanent the so-called gig economy is turning out to be. I once thought, perhaps naïvely, that they'd be temporary measures that would fade out of favor once the economic outlook had improved. But there's no sign of a slowdown in the creation of new and innovative ways for people to commit themselves to sub-optimal economic conditions, possibly for the rest of their lives.

 

In this week's New Yorker, James Surowiecki looks at Upstart, a year-old company begun by ex-Googlers that is giving young people in the post-crash economy the chance to indenture themselves to patrons in the investor class. It does this by making it easy for users to create human-capital contracts — an agreement that says, for example, that investors can give you a lump-sum payment of $50,000 in exchange for 5 percent of your income for the next twenty years.


Via Denis Pennel
Erika Watson's insight:

I think this is an overly bleak view of the 'gig economy' , seeing it in polarisation. Yes it is disruptive. But as a new way of working it also opens up positive opportunities for a lot of ppl - especially many who were excluded from 'traditional' opportunities.  We need to find ways of making it work, not winding it back. 

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Go freelance and work harder. But will you work better?

Go freelance and work harder. But will you work better? | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
MOST of us know people who have ceased to be full-time wage-earning employees and are now either working on rolling, three-month contracts or are self-employed in...
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40% of America’s workforce will be freelancers by 2020

40% of America’s workforce will be freelancers by 2020 | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

The debate over telecommuting that Yahoo has spurred raises an important issue, but it's not simply about workplace flexibility or telecommuting, but rather the fundamental nature of work itself. By 2020, more than 40% of the US workforce will be so called contingent workers. We are quickly becoming a nation of permanent freelancers and temps. 

 

We are quickly becoming a nation of permanent freelancers and temps. In 2006, the last time the federal government counted, the number of independent and contingent workers—contractors, temps, and the self-employed—stood at 42.6 million, or about 30% of the workforce. How many are there today? We have no idea since 2006 was the last year that the government bothered to count this huge and growing sector of the American workforce.

 

Following the recent economic downturn, the employment rate has recovered at a frustratingly slow pace, except in one area: temporary, contingent, and independent workers. Between 2009 and 2012, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of temporary employees rose by 29%. A survey of the 200 largest companies found that temporary workers represented, on average, 22% of their workforce, and that percentage is growing. Workers from all different industries (not just tech) are discovering that they’re able to be productive outside of the corporate office and without a long-term employer. At my company, NextSpace, we provide membership to contingent and independent workers from industries as varied as marketing, law, media, accounting, entertainment, construction, art, architecture, and healthcare, along with hundreds of programmers and developers.

 

The forces behind this sea-change are many: the rapid adoption of mobile technology, ubiquitous internet access, and a general sense of malaise powered by the vague yet nagging notion that we’re just not meant to work all day sitting in a cubicle. Add to that the waste of time, energy and brainpower that commuting engenders, and it becomes apparent that our definition of “workplace” will never be the same. It may seem like a tug of war between companies and workers, but in fact they share common goals: using technology and mobility to maximize productivity, innovation, and well-being.


Via Trudy Raymakers, Denis Pennel
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Self-employment: not just for the downturn

Self-employment: not just for the downturn | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Today’s ONS figures show the self-employed account for just under 15% of total employment, the highest it has been in two decades. The numbers in self-employment have grown by over 7% in year, compared to growth of just 1.6% in the number of employees. SMF Chief Economist Nida Broughton asks whether this a good thing or not?
Erika Watson's insight:

SUmmary:  This is a structural trend.

Implications for policy:

First,we must not assume is that the rise in self-employment is evidence of some new entrepreneurial revolution that will power future economic growth. Most self-employed individuals will not go off and set up high growth companies. 

Second, we need to take better account of the self-employed in wider policy decisions relating to social policy and labour markets. Many policies designed to work through employers do not touch the growing number of self-employed. eg. minimum wage, pensions auto-enrolment.  

We are in danger of creating a two-track labour market, with highly protected employees on one track, and a growing number of self-employed with much less support on the other.

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On their own

On their own | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

PERHAPS the future belongs to the self-employed. Steady jobs, after all, are hard to find. The idea that a young graduate should expect to work for 40 years with the...

Erika Watson's insight:

Structural shift to increased self-employment on both sides of the Atlantic...

Excerpt: But perhaps the structural trend means those paid jobs will not become available. If so, the economy may have created a vast reserve labour force, akin to the “spinsters” of early 19th-century Britain—single women who were paid piece rates for spinning textiles at home—or the dockers who used to mass outside port gates in the hope of being selected for a day’s work. That would suggest an economy where wages are permanently kept under pressure and where profit margins remain high. Good news for the stockmarket perhaps, but not so good for the self-employed.

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Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 24, 3:57 PM

Good story in The Economist on the rise of self-employment in USA and UK!

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The Era of Declining Self-Employment

The Era of Declining Self-Employment | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
The number of employed Americans rose from 144,144,000 in October 2013 to 144,775,000 in November 2013, an increase of 631,000, according to Federal government data. That’s good news.
Erika Watson's insight:

Self-employment trends are different in the US,. 

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Self-employment all-time high is proof of structural change, says PCG - Link2Portal

Self-employment all-time high is proof of structural change, says PCG - Link2Portal | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Self-employment all-time high is proof of structural change, says PCG Link2Portal PCG, the membership organisation for independent professionals, has responded to the ONS labour statistics released today which show a sharp rise in those choosing...
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What would Robin Hood do: How cash handouts are remaking lives in Brazil - The Globe and Mail

What would Robin Hood do: How cash handouts are remaking lives in Brazil - The Globe and Mail | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Erika Watson's insight:

Excerpt: "Ten years ago, Brazil set out to do something that few countries have ever overtly attempted: become more equal. The undertaking was unusual, but even more remarkable was the outcome: measurable success. Brazil has in the past decade moved people out of poverty on an unprecedented scale – the standard of living improved so much for 22 million that they are no longer considered “poor.” Millions more living on the knife-edge of starvation in drought-ridden expanses of the interior are still poor but vastly better off. Between 2003 and 2009, incomes of the poorest Brazilians grew seven times those of rich citizens.


And how did Brazil help? It gave its poorest citizens money.

It’s an idea that was once anathema to development experts and economists, and which is still deeply unpopular in many quarters – witness the hostility to “welfare moms” in the developed world. But the effectiveness of giving money to poor people to make them less poor is supported by mounting evidence as a smart way to address poverty. Sixty-three countries have sent experts here to learn about the Bolsa Familia – the family grant.

Brazil’s is not the biggest anti-poverty program in the world – it is dwarfed by several in South Asia, such as India’s $70-billion guaranteed-income-for-work scheme, for example.

And it is not the only one to use cash transfers, which are done on a moderate scale in India, on a larger one in South Africa, and which exist in some form in dozens of developing countries today, run either by the state or by private aid organizations.

What makes Brazil’s program stand out is the rock-solid evidence of the many ways this program has served to remake, dramatically, the lives of millions of people over the past decade.

 

The price tag, however, is astonishingly modest: just 0.46 per cent of GDP, for a total of $11.5-billion this year. (This means that, despite the slowdown in Brazil’s economy, the program isn’t threatened.) Overhead is kept to a minimum – there is no food to move around, as there was in previous nutrition programs that were meant to deliver needy families ration packs, and which were vulnerable to immense amounts of corruption.

And once the national registry was in place, there wasn’t much infrastructure to worry about. The grant isn’t a lot of money, but it is a guaranteed amount, so it allows people to make plans, and sometimes to save – two luxuries the poor never had relying on uncertain work and surviving day-by-day. It taught a new level of financial literacy, Ms. Campello says, to people who had never before had any prospect of regular income to budget with.

She calls it an investment. “These millions of people who get the Bolsa Familia are people who are spending here in Brazil. This money multiplies the GDP. We want them as consumers, as part of the country. And as workers. Brazil needs these workers. So we are not doing this just for social assistance. We are doing this because we believe it’s good for the country.”


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The return of artisanal employment

The return of artisanal employment | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

IT'S been one of the hottest economic questions for at least the last few decades: what sort of jobs will provide a comfortable, secure, middle-class lifestyle for the next generation of Americans? America still has a vibrant manufacturing industry, but it no longer offers large numbers of desirable jobs.

 

During a panel at last week's Buttonwood conference Harvard economist Larry Katz had an answer. He reckons that future “good” middle-class jobs will come from the re-emergence of artisans, or highly skilled people in each field. Two examples he mentioned: a contractor who installs beautiful kitchens and a thoughtful, engaging caregiver to the elderly. He reckons the critical thinking skills derived from a liberal arts education give people who do these jobs an edge. The labour market will reward this; the contractor who studied art history or the delightful caregiver with a background in theatre will thrive.

 

This is consistent with a shift in the labour market I've observed. It seems the market now rewards individual more than firm-specific capital. That's economic jargon for the idea that it's better to be really good at your job than merely good at being an employee. There's less value in being the company man; you must be your own man possessing a dynamic skill set applicable in a variety of ways. That often means honing one's skills by changing jobs a few times, rather than staying with one employer for an entire career. Before the crisis, average job tenure had decreased, while the probably of losing a job declined. That suggests more voluntary job changes.

 


Via Denis Pennel
Erika Watson's insight:

Charles Handy's Empty Raincoat has arrived...

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The fast disappearing income of the UK’s self-employed

The fast disappearing income of the UK’s self-employed | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
A couple of weeks ago I started to prepare what I thought would be a quick blog on the differences between HMRC and ONS data on the number of self employed people.
Erika Watson's insight:

I did similar stats comparison for recent presentations via the Fabian Society. Conclusion is that while government has cheerleaded the increase in self-employment, real support and training for most small businesses has been slashed...  and alongside that chances of business survival.  The cost to new businesses, innovation and the tax take for us all is massive: and it's going to get worse as Universal Credit for the Self-employed destroys the safety net for low earning self-employed people as well.  (see www.prowess.org.uk/universal-credit-self-employed).

 

Also of course,  a significant factor is that for the first time ever most of the new self-employed are women.  

 

 

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How An Exploding Freelance Economy Will Drive Change In 2014

How An Exploding Freelance Economy Will Drive Change In 2014 | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it

In 2013, the freelance economy continued to dominate the discussion about the way we work. One in three Americans (roughly 42 million) are estimated to be freelancers. By 2020, freelancers are expected to make up 50% of the full time workforce. Independent work is becoming more common across all generations and the vast majority plan to remain independent in the coming year.

 

The freelance economy is exploding at exactly the same moment that companies are undergoing a major shift in how they hire. Talent is moving from a fixed cost (and one that’s historically been one of the largest across a business) to a variable cost, with companies staffing up and down as needed. Businesses have the ability to quickly on-board hundreds or thousands of freelance workers– provided they have the tools and systems in place to manage them. The booming online staffing industry is also accelerating the growth of the freelance economy. This $1 billion industry provides a valuable alternative to companies that are leveraging a contingent workforce. In fact, the Staffing Industry Association saw the online staffing market grow 60% last year, and we see no signs of that growth slowing down in 2014 and beyond.

 


Via Trudy Raymakers, Denis Pennel
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Switzerland's Proposal to Pay People for Being Alive - New York Times

Switzerland's Proposal to Pay People for Being Alive - New York Times | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Switzerland's Proposal to Pay People for Being Alive
New York Times
The proposal is, in part, the brainchild of a German-born artist named Enno Schmidt, a leader in the basic-income movement. He knows it sounds a bit crazy.
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Is Freelancing More Secure Than Traditional Employment?

Is Freelancing More Secure Than Traditional Employment? | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
One of the more interesting data points from the MBO Partners State of Independence surveys is how independent workers (freelancers, temps, self-employed, etc.) look at job security.
Erika Watson's insight:

For many freelancing allows risk to be spread across several clients - the number who feel freelancing is more secure as a result than traditional employment, seems to be rising. 

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Jobseekers and the self-employment trap

Jobseekers and the self-employment trap | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
Yesterday's outburst against Esther McVey and her innovative way of interpreting the benefit claimant statistics proved very popular as readers clamoured to suggest alternative reasons why people w...

Via britishroses
Erika Watson's insight:

Are DWP pushing people into self-employment? Lots of debate and shared experience of precarious self-employment...

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Prepare for the New Permanent Temp

Prepare for the New Permanent Temp | Self-employment LM shift | Scoop.it
The question is not when more full-time jobs will return, what's next for "temporary" employees.
Erika Watson's insight:

Larry Summers once said, 'in the history of the world, no-one ever washed a hire car' ie. don't expect employers to invest in temps skills.  

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