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UK Fractured Technology: Undermining Trust & Ownership?

UK Fractured Technology: Undermining Trust & Ownership? | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

"Despite a substantial ...research showing that giving employees more autonomy and control leads to productivity growth, the UK in the last decade has been moving in the opposite direction."

 

Oxford professor Duncan Gallie and his colleagues found strong evidence of declining ‘task discretion’ and a significant reduction in autonomy in UK jobs.

 

Similarly, researchers Michael White and Stephen Hill suggest that while employees may have more freedom to decide how they deliver their targets, employers operate more rigorous regimes of accountability through sophisticated performance management systems and extensive surveillance.

 

Both studies show some workers have less control in their jobs than a decade ago, and that the use of IT in the workplace is one of the key areas for the erosion of autonomy. 


Via Fabrice De Zanet, donhornsby, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

We have choices, including deciding where you choose to focus your job search or entrepreneurial - intraprenuerial work, such as to include or NOT include a company that uses Big Data this way.  ~  Deb

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donhornsby's curator insight, May 10, 2013 4:17 AM

(From the article): So technology pulls in two directions – sometimes reducing autonomy, sometimes stimulating creativity. Perhaps in workplaces where there is already a climate of distrust or cynicism, technology will be met with distrust, if the apparent liberty of ‘always-on technology’ leads to the tyranny of ‘always-on work’.

Laurence Dubuc's curator insight, May 10, 2013 5:49 AM

IT in the workplace: the autonomy of the worker seems to be challenged by heavier surveillance mecanisms, such as Big Data, 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 10, 2013 11:08 AM

Is this big data gone bad?  Don't be that organization.  

In the book, "The Charge," successful entrepreneur Brendon Burchard comments, "the team and project-based work dynamic causes many of us to act in ways that actually impair our ability to learn."  

This stream will be about searching out ways to instill positive, systemic practice that support talent development to the fullest.  ~  Deb

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5 High-Paying Jobs That Will Make You Miserable

5 High-Paying Jobs That Will Make You Miserable | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

If you think that a fat salary is all you need to be happy, think again. Many high-paid professions are also high-stress—and highly likely to lead to misery.


A sample of the 5 top careers and the unhappiness:


Doctor
Sandeep Jauhur, [a] cardiologist makes the case that doctors, once the proud, well-paid, contented pillars of communities around the country, are deeply unhappy with what’s been happening in the field of medicine—and that many regret going into the profession. He points to data such as a survey in which only 6% of physicians described morale on the job as positive….the majority of doctors say their pay has been flat or on the decline for years. More importantly, they’re unhappy.

Physicians also tend to have unusually high suicide rates. According to the American Society for Suicide Prevention, male physicians commit suicide at a 70% higher rate compared with other professions, and female physicians die by their own hands at shocking clip that’s 250% to 400% higher than women in other lines of work.


Junior Investment Banker
Author Kevin Roose follows eight recent college grads through their first years in investment banking.    “It’s a terrible …. 120-hour weeks new bankers are forced to work. The load is so unbearable that even high salaries—base starting around $75,000, with bonuses that could double that, and the potential to make millions down the line—aren’t attracting the number of recruits banks are used to.”

   

Sales Manager
Being in sales in hard. Being in charge of sales is even harder. That’s why, despite its high average paycheck—$123,150 a year, ....sales managers still landed on Forbes’ Unhappiest Jobs of 2014 list, which used self-reported job reviews from CareerBliss. .... Complaints run the gamut from constant pressure to feelings of boredom and emptiness.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Eye openings in that some of our career perceptions may be too dated.  This is a useful dose of reality for 2014 careers. ~ D

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The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk. Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’?

The Sharing Economy = Freedom, Uncertainty and Risk.  Good Gigs, or ‘Wage Slavery’? | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

"Workers are their own bosses in the so-called sharing economy, but that flexibility also brings much uncertainty — and few of the protections of full-time work."


_________________________
   
“People are doing this in the midst of wage stagnation and income inequality…to survive.” ~ Sara Horowitz, Freelancers Union

_________________________
    

Jennifer Guidry, 35, [uses] her own car to ferry around strangers for Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, ride services that let people summon drivers on demand via apps. She also assembles furniture and tends gardens for clients who find her on TaskRabbit, an online marketplace for chores.

    

Her goal is to earn at least $25 an hour, on average. Raising three children with her longtime partner, Jeffrey Bradbury, she depends on the income to help cover her family’s food and rent. 

    

“You don’t know day to day,” she said. “It’s very up in the air.”

     

The sharing economy, whose sites and apps connect people seeking services with sellers of those services, Ms. Guidry is a microentrepreneur, an independent contractor who earns money by providing her skills, time or property to consumers in search of a lift, a room to sleep in, a dry-cleaning pickup, a chef, an organizer of closets.

    

_________________________
   

..[With] continuing high unemployment, however, people like Ms. Guidry are less microentrepreneurs than micro-earners. 

_________________________


   

For those seeking a sideline, these services can provide extra income. …businesses like Airbnb, the short-term-stay broker; task brokers like TaskRabbit and Fiverr; on-demand delivery services like Postmates and Favor; and grocery-shopping services like Instacart.

     

Six years ago, she had a full-time job as the controller at a small company. After she gave birth to her youngest son, her office asked her to work extended hours. She couldn’t both accommodate the company and take care of her newborn. So she ended up leaving her job.

   

...[With] continuing high unemployment, however, people like Ms. Guidry are less microentrepreneurs than micro-earners. They often work seven-day weeks, trying to assemble a living wage from a series of one-off gigs. …To reduce the risks, many workers toggle among multiple services.


....“If you did the calculations, many of these people would be earning less than minimum wage,” says Dean Baker, an economist who is the co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington. “You are getting people to self-exploit in ways we have regulations in place to prevent.”

====


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

               

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

      

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 1:42 PM

What will it take to make the adjustments needed to provide good wages and employment to most?  The market may not be kind to those on their own without the needed unique/hard to find talent.  I'll be following this topic using the tags "post-job" and "post job economy" as well as via related posts following the job experiences of millennials.  ~  D

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New Study: Leaders Are Less Stressed Than Their Subordinates

New Study: Leaders Are Less Stressed Than Their Subordinates | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

By measuring a stress hormone and asking questions about anxiety levels, researchers found that leaders experience less stress than subordinates. Published on Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

   

Excerpted:
   

To gauge anxiety levels, the researchers asked the subjects to respond to a series of statements like, “I get in a state of tension or turmoil as I think over my recent concerns and interests,” and rate them on a scale of one to four. The leaders’ responses to the anxiety questionnaire showed they were less stressed than the non-leaders.


A couple of other interesting things the study found: The leaders were more likely to be male and to have more money than the subordinates. They also exercised more, smoked less, woke up earlier, slept less and drank more coffee than the non-leaders.
      

Though the study’s findings may seem counterintuitive (DN: to some of us) —we think of leaders as pressurized workaholics, especially in these tight economic times—they are consistent with earlier research suggesting that people who have more of a sense of control, are less stressed.

   

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

               

            

          

    

          

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

                 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Are we surprised?  Having more power, influence and authority is literally empowering in reducing stress.  Now how could that be passed on down the line?  ~  D

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Thijs Westerink's curator insight, August 15, 10:19 AM

Do you want less stress? become a leader!

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4 Ways To Retrain Your Brain To Handle Information Overload

4 Ways To Retrain Your Brain To Handle Information Overload | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

Psychologist and behavioral neuroscientist Daniel Levitin says we can regain control over our brains by organizing information in a way that optimizes our brain’s capacity.

   

Levitinauthor of the upcoming book The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload, says information overload creates daily challenges for our brains, causing us to feel mentally exhausted before the day's end.
   
Strategies:

1. EXTERNALIZE DATA

Rather than carrying around in your head a to-do list of 20 or 30 items, put them on paper. 


2. MAKE BIG DECISIONS IN THE MORNING

3. BE ORGANIZED

Allow your physical environment to serve as reminders, alleviating the pressure on your brain to recall things.   ...Hanging the umbrella on the doorknob when you hear the weather report reduces the clutter in your brain the next morning--and you’re less likely to get wet.

   

4. MULTITASKING IS A MYTH

Using up the brain’s glucose supply by task switching means the brain will reach a level of fatigue much sooner in the day 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Some of us, perhaps many of us, already practice some of these tips, like setring out the umbrella, or list making when the list is long.   Doing it more consistently can make a difference.  


And that's why I like to be pressure-prompted by cleaning up for the cleaning lady - and setting up deadlines for when friends come over, to toss the unneeded clutter.  ~  D

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Get Honest: PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi: No, Women Can't Have It All

Get Honest:  PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi: No, Women Can't Have It All | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it
PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi said she doesn't think that women can "have it all," adding that a career requires women to sacrifice some aspects of motherhood.


Nooyi says there's no way to square a high-pressure career with raising kids.  "My observation, David, is that the biological clock and the career clock are in total conflict with each other. Total, complete conflict. 


When Indra Nooyi's daughter complained that she didn't attend school events, Nooyi developed coping mechanisms:
I called the school and I said, "give me a list of mothers that are not there." So when she came home in the evening she said, "You were not there, you were not there." And I said, "ah ha, Mrs. Redd wasn't there, Mrs. So and So wasn't there. So I'm not the only bad mother."


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Her stories are telling and sense-making about executive rank, long hours, and need for extended family and others to make it work, and the reality of the impact on family relationships.  ~  D

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Do you work for a White-Collar Salt Mine? How to Change it Up

Do you work for a White-Collar Salt Mine?  How to Change it Up | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it
Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.


Srinivasan S. Pillay, a psychiatrist and professor at Harvard Medical School who studies burnout, surveyed a random sample of 72 senior leaders and found that nearly all of them reported at least some signs of burnout and that all of them noted at least one cause of burnout at work.


_____________________
   
Employees are vastly more satisfied and productive, when four of their core needs are met:  physical, emotional, mental and spiritual... 

_____________________

       

Demand for our time is increasingly exceeding our capacity — draining us of the energy we need to bring our skill and talent fully to life. …Digital technology …exposies us to an unprecedented flood of information and requests…


The Energy Project (article authors) partnered with the Harvard Business Review last fall to survey 12,000 mostly white-collar employees across a broad range of companies and industries, a manufacturing company with 6,000 employees, and a financial services company with 2,500 employees. The results were remarkably similar across all three populations.
Employees are vastly more satisfied and productive, when four of their core needs are met:

1) physical, through opportunities to regularly renew and recharge at work;

  
2) emotional, by feeling valued and appreciated for their contributions;


3) mental, when they have the opportunity to focus in an absorbed way on their most important tasks and define when and where they get their work done; and


4) spiritual, by doing more of what they do best and enjoy most, and by feeling connected to a higher purpose at work.

THE more effectively leaders and organizations support employees in meeting these core needs, the more likely the employees are to experience engagement, loyalty, job satisfaction and positive energy at work, and the lower their perceived levels of stress.


...A truly human-centered organization puts its people first — even above customers — because it recognizes that they are the key to creating long-term value. Costco, for example, pays its average worker $20.89 an hour, Businessweek reported last year, about 65 percent more than Walmart, which owns its biggest competitor, Sam’s Club. Over time, Costco’s huge investment in employees — including offering benefits to part-time workers — has proved to be a distinct advantage.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is updated research is useful for looking at how a unhealthy work environment structure  is bad for business as well as for individual leaders and professionals.  From the article:  "the way people feel at work profoundly influences how they perform."  The Costco example is a case in point.  ~ D

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Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice: New Research on Why

Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice:  New Research on Why | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

Carly Fiorina, forced out. A MERE 5% of the chief executives of the world’s biggest companies are women. And they are more likely to be sacked than their more numerous male colleagues: 38% of the female CEOs who left their jobs over the past ten years were forced to go, compared with 27% of the men. 
     
In the Strategy& study, the clumsy new name for Booz & Company, 35% of female CEOs are hired from outside the company, compared with just 22% of male ones.

  • Outsiders generally have a higher chance of being kicked out, 
  • Generate lower returns to shareholders
  • Outsiders are less likely to have a support network of friends who can rally around when times get tough. 
         

Carly Fiorina, dropped as HP’s boss in 2005, made things worse by inviting such publicity. But the same is not true of, say, Ginni Rometty, the lower-profile boss of IBM (promoted from within the company in 2012), who is under fire over the firm’s performance.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

                    

                   

                              


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a useful gender perspective on leadership development and, as the article concludes, a call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping to prevent raiding because of scarce supply, (and it's counterproductive anyway, the research suggests) and 3) increasing success by having more women to promote from within.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 6:17 AM

The change leader implication, as described in the article, is the call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping diminish raiding due to scarce supply, which tends to be counterproductive for women's careers anyway, and 3) increasing success by having more women available to promote from within.  ~ Deb


Also posted to Careers and Self-Aware Strength.

Tamkin Amin's curator insight, May 15, 2:03 PM

hmmm... I find this interesting.

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The Cheerleaders Rise Up - Sexism, Wages, Power & Football, Circa 2014

The Cheerleaders Rise Up - Sexism, Wages, Power & Football, Circa 2014 | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

In 2014, the cheerleaders revolted. This January, rookie NFL cheerleader Lacy T. kicked things off when she filed a class action lawsuit against the Oakland Raiders, alleging that:

  • the team fails to pay its Raiderettes minimum wage,
  • withholds their pay until the end of the season,
  • imposes illegal fines for minor infractions (like gaining 5 pounds), and forces cheerleaders to pay their own business expenses (everything from false eyelashes to monthly salon visits). 


Within a month, Cincinnati Bengals cheerleader Alexa Brenneman had filed a similar suit against her team, claiming that the Ben-Gals are paid just $2.85 an hour for their work on the sidelines. And Tuesday, five former Buffalo Bills cheerleaders filed suit against their own team, alleging that the Buffalo Jills were required to perform unpaid work for the team for about 20 hours a week.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Good for them.  From all appearance, this sounds like a very creepy, patriarchal abuse of women, sexuality, pay and power.  It goes with the companion post in "Careers & Self-Aware Strength"  Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Secretary? A 1959 Flashback   featuring 50's style wage sexism that is still around today, 2014.  


For example of the creepy sexism 2014 style, note "NFL teams like the Raiders extend the patriarch metaphor by encouraging cheerleaders to see the team as a “family” (not an employer), refer to their squad mates as “sisters” (not co-workers), and implying that they’ll break the “sisterhood bond” if they step out of line."

Even creepier, "NFL teams...enforce expectations for the way their cheerleaders look ...while rewarding them, not with money, but with the supposed prestige of appearing as one of their city’s most desirable women."

It's time to put a stop to it, and let's hope the law is on their side. "We've still got a long way to go, baby!" ~ D

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Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Secretary? A 1959 Flashback and Women's Work Today

Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Secretary? A 1959 Flashback and Women's Work Today | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

Question 1:   Do you have "a natural flair for organizing the activities of others?"

In honor of Administrative Professionals Week, last year the National Archive'sText Message blog dug up some wonderful materials capturing what it was like to be a secretary in mid-century America. 

....Secretarial work is the most common job for women in America today, just as it was in 1950. And, "according to the U.S. Census," they add, "96% of the approximately 4 million people who identify themselves today as secretaries (or something similar) are women."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

That old Virginia Slims (smoking) ad about "You've come a long way, baby" seems a little out of place while reviewing these past and present statistics about women in , shared during Administrative Professionals Week.  ~  D

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Ditch the Myths: The Difference Between Successful and Very Successful People

Ditch the Myths:  The Difference Between Successful and Very Successful People | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

Many of us have been sold a bill of goods.  

We’ve been sold on a heroic ideal of the uber-man and super-women who kill themselves saying yes to everyone, sleeping four hours a night and straining to fit everything in. 


Examples from the list:

Myth 1: Successful people say, "If I can fit it in, I should fit it in."

Truth: Very successful people are absurdly selective.

     

Myth 2: Successful people sleep four hours a night.

Truth: Very successful people rest well so they can be at peak performance.

      

Myth 4: Successful people are the first ones to jump in with an answer.

Truth: Very successful people are powerful listeners.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

       

                

           




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I just  finished working with a colleague's horse-guided leadership development program for a day this weekend.  One large take-away from one of the executive MBA clients (all in day jobs in local companies), was this:   Active listening to others is essential.

The other myths listed, such as focusing on what YOU can do better, play, creativity, matter to the MOST successful people.  ~  D 

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Your One Big Life: How to Be Anti-Fragile through Downturns, Upturns and Turnarounds

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is our SlideShare of our recent presentation at the University of Michigan, the Women of Color Task Force career conference.  A photo set and session references are also listed on my recent speaking events page here.  More info is at  REVELN Tools here including a summary of Nicholas Nassim Taleb's quotes from AntifragileThings That Gain From Disorder.


See the photo set from the Open Space session here.  


Sign up for the BEST of the BEST news (delivered monthly, unsubscribe at any time) there as well. ~ D

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Leaders, It Doesn't Balance ~ Instead, Integrate Your Career and Personal Life | HBR

Leaders, It Doesn't Balance ~ Instead,  Integrate Your Career and Personal Life | HBR | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it
A former CEO reflects on the imperfection of work-life balance.  

...The challenge is to integrate work and personal life effectively, not achieve a separation that is less attainable than ever.

     

Excerpts:
    

Be realistic about work. In my experience, people make it to the top job by working extraordinarily hard. And once they get there, they find that there is no letup.   .....recognize that you cannot do everything.
    
Don’t expect perfection in personal life.  ...Expect to fall short some of the time.

    

Change the metaphor.   ....work and personal life has been spoken of as a question of “balance.”  ...smartphones...also keep us in close touch with our non-work-lives. ...I keep all of my personal and professional commitments on a single, integrated calendar, treating each one of them as inviolable.
   

Be present. When you are with family or friends be fully there...don’t treat personal encounters as you would a meeting, where you check in...

   

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

    


     


Photo credit:  by RichardStep.com Flickr cc

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It is "One Big Life," especially for executives and leaders.  These are helpful words of wisdom from a CEO who knows the pressure AND who knows how to step away and get reconnected to his personal life, especially during crises & learning how to be fully "present" during important family times.  ~  D

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Vulnerability Based Trust in Leadership | Patrick Lencioni: 5 Dysfunctions Of a Team Video

Vulnerability Based Trust in Leadership | Patrick Lencioni: 5 Dysfunctions Of a Team Video | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

Revealing the Basic of Real Leadership: Vulnerability Based Trust

Excerpts by 12manage.com:

Patrick Lencioni explains how vulnerability-based trust is crucial for a leader to create a team.


People will follow leaders to a fire if they are human, honest and vulnerable, without faking it.    When it is not painful to be vulnerable in the moment, do not do it.


________________
   
...to be human, real and vulnerable.
 

________________
    

    
In this way leaders generate trust in their teams by giving the example and helping people to get comfortable being vulnerable with one another and to understand the importance if this. They have to be human, real and vulnerable.


Even if just one member of a team has problems with vulnerability, it can hurt the dynamics of the team. Trust is critical to an organization.

Also it is important to support people to be better than you. .


Related posts & tools by Deb:


                

             

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    These are tough lessons about trust, vulnerability and supporting people to be better than you.  We have a long ways to go to create environments where this happens more consistently.  

    Yet, it IS happening and can happen.  It takes consistent reinforcement that it is a norm, and it takes leaders who stick around long enough to establish it as a deep cultural norm.   ~  D

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    The man who lives without money, and what it means for our happiness

    The man who lives without money, and what it means for our happiness | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

    Irishman Mark Boyle [lived for more than a year with] no income, no bank balance and no spending…[as a way of exploring his awareness] …of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the ‘stuff’ we buy.
              

    [His plan was originally] …to get a ‘good’ job, make as much money as possible, and buy the stuff that would show society I was successful.

    For a while I did it – I had a fantastic job managing a big organic food company; had myself a yacht on the harbour. If it hadn’t been for the chance purchase of a video called Gandhi, I’d still be doing it today. Instead, for the last fifteen months, I haven’t spent or received a single penny. Zilch.

         

    __________________
       
    I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect...

    __________________

            

    The change ...came one evening on the yacht whilst philosophising with a friend over a glass of merlot.  Whilst I had been significantly influenced by the Mahatma’s quote “be the change you want to see in the world”, I had no idea what that change was up until then. 

           

    …that evening I had a realisation. …I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect     …Very few people actually want to cause suffering,…most just don’t have any idea that they directly are. The tool that has enabled this separation is money, especially in its globalised format.

         

    __________________

        
    ...if we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today. 

    __________________
         

    Take this for an example: if we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today.   If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior décor.

         

    So to be the change I wanted to see in the world, it unfortunately meant I was going to have to give up money, which I decided to do for a year initially. So I made a list of the basics I’d need to survive.   ...food...was at the top. There are four legs to the food-for-free table: foraging wild food, growing your own, bartering and using waste grub, of which there far too much.
        

    On my first day I fed 150 people a three course meal with waste and foraged food. Most of the year I ate my own crops...I cooked outside – rain or shine – on a rocket stove.
         

    Next up was shelter. So I got myself a caravan from Freecycle, parked it on an organic farm I was volunteering with, and kitted it out to be off the electricity grid. …I had a bike and trailer, and the 55 km commute to the city doubled up as my gym subscription. For lighting I’d use beeswax candles.

           

    Many people label me an anti-capitalist. …I am not anti anything. I am pro-nature, pro-community and pro-happiness.   ...all the key indicators of unhappiness – depression, crime, mental illness, obesity, suicide and so on are on the increase. More money it seems, does not equate to more happiness.
         
     

    __________________


         I have found this year to be the happiest of my life. …....friendship, not money, is real security.

     

    __________________



    Ironically, I have found this year to be the happiest of my life. …I’ve found that friendship, not money, is real security. That most western poverty is spiritual. And that independence is really interdependence.

               
    Could we all live like this tomorrow? No. It would be a catastrophe…  But if we devolved decision making ...to communities of no larger than 150 people, then why not?    For over 90 per cent of our time on this planet, a period when we lived much more ecologically, we lived without money. Now we are the only species to use it, probably because we are the species most out of touch with nature.

    As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This is a good indicator of how the young can help us question our infrastructure, our beliefs, our systems.  With more of these type of stories, things will begin to change, especially if, we "become the change we want to see in the world."  ~  D

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      How to Spot a Bad Boss Before you start a New Job

      How to Spot a Bad Boss Before you start a New Job | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      Bad bosses are terrible for your career. They’re terrible for companies. They’re terrible for the economy and, in a wider sense, they’re terrible for society. We’ve all encountered bosses who project their own insecurities onto other people by carving out small fiefdoms and ruling them with an iron fist. ...They micromanage. And they refuse to take accountability.
       

      What are the signs ...that can tip you off that you should run in the other direction?

      1. How do the other employees seem when you come in for the interview?

      If they avoid eye contact, or seem sullen or disengaged, dissatisfaction with the supervisor might be the culprit. ...A good boss will be conscientious of building a thriving ecosystem, and he or she will want buy-in from other members of the team before adding to it.

          

      2. Does the supervisor speak overly negatively of previous employees?
          
      3. Are they distracted in the interview or overly pushy?

          

      4. Have you looked up the company culture online?
         
      5. Have you asked them what kind of boss they are?
      ....Ask a prospective supervisor about their leadership style to see if it jives with the way you like to work.
          

      As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

            

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      Photo credit, Yelling by Michael, Flickr CC

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      The questions are useful and on target.    

      I've been involved in more "transition out" coaching engagements than I'd like that have been directly related to mismanagement and toxic bosses. It can be career ending. It is possible to turn things around from the bottom up, in reading the comments. However, the legion of comments on this post speaks to our persistent industrial age trappings based in old school command and control, or at least the illusion of control.  


      You are always free to leave, and that might mean before you start.  Upper level leadership that persists in tolerating a toxic manager is communicating a lot about its cultural beliefs about its staff, and generally, that means staff are quite low on the list of what is valued.    ~  D

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      How to Get the Job When You Don't Have the Experience - at Any Age

      How to Get the Job When You Don't Have the Experience - at Any Age | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      "The Permission Paradox" - You can’t get the job without the experience but you can’t get the experience without the job - is one of the great career Catch-22s. 


      Excerpts:

      Beyond showing your potential...here are five specific strategies you can deploy to overcome the Permission Paradox in the early days of your career.
       

      Five Permission Strategies
           

      1. Get Credentials. One of the most logical ways to gain permission is to obtain relevant credentials. This can be in the form of a specialized degree or targeted training.
           
      2. Get Creative.  “Volunteer at a start-up....You will have the opportunity to do a wide variety of activities which will help you find what you love and build some skills at the same time." 
      3. Be Willing to Start at the Bottom.  
      4. Barter
      5. Re-imagine Your Experience.

       

      As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

             

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Career advising was my first job when starting out.  I loved the work, enjoyed the career clients, many who were changing careers, and know that this advice is right on.  It also works for those "Shifting Gears" as this is a program in Michigan that has been successful for helping downsized corporate executives and professionals take a new path.    Internships with start-ups, as recommended in the article, is part of the experience.   ~  Deb

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      Infographic: The 10 Most Important Work Skills in 2020

      Infographic:  The 10 Most Important Work Skills in 2020 | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      Source:  The Atlantic cited a paper by the  Institute for the Future (IFTF) has been a leader in advancing foresight methodologies, from the Delphi technique, a method of aggregating expert opinions to develop plausible foresight, to integrating ethnographic methods into the discipline of forecasting, and recently to using gaming platforms to crowdsource foresights. 


      Via the Change Samurai
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Worth a look, including learning about how to superstruct.   From the report:

      To “superstruct” means to create structures that go beyond 

      the basic forms and processes with which we are familiar. It 

      means to collaborate and play at extreme scales, from the 

      micro to the massive.

      Learning to use new social tools to work, to invent, and to govern at these scales is what the next few decades are all about. 

       

         ~ Deb

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      When Will Your Career Peak? New Survey Research Reveals Differences by Gender & Generation

      When Will Your Career Peak? New Survey Research Reveals Differences by Gender & Generation | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      "According to a new survey of over 1,000 male and female professionals released by Citi and LinkedIn, the age that you think your career will peak appears to be a moving target - getting further away as you move from one generation to the next."

      "The survey illustrates that career satisfaction and success are not just end goals - they're both moving targets," said Linda Descano, President and CEO of Women & Co. "While the age at which professionals believe they will peak varies by generation, most expect the high point of their career to occur within the next several years.

      Yet at the same time, they believe that the happiest moment of their careers was several years in the past, suggesting that peak satisfaction does not necessarily mean the height of career success."

           
      The survey also found significant differences in the way that women and men define career satisfaction - illustrated in the infographic. 

      • Men were more likely than women to equate career satisfaction with a "good salary", while women rated salary, "doing what I love," and "being challenged" as equally important to their satisfaction.  
           
      • Further, women are more likely than men to equate career satisfaction with "making an impact on the world" and "helping people".   
       Related tools & posts by Deb: Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free via REVELN Tools. Go to REVELN.com for more information.
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      From the survey it shows that the happiest point in careers of those surveyed were several years in the past  I wonder if the 2008 recession had an impact on the findings, along with the satisfaction differences by  gender.   ~  Deb 

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      A Life Beyond 'Do What You Love' ~ Getting the Context of Life Right

      A Life Beyond 'Do What You Love' ~ Getting the Context of Life Right | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      "Is “do what you love” wisdom or malarkey? Is it time to reconnect the  traditional link between work and duty?"


      ____________________
         
      ...[Does] work itself possesses an inherent value...[a] connection between work, talent and duty?

      ____________________

          

      In a much discussed article in Jacobin magazine early this year, the writer Miya Tokumitsu argued that the “do what you love” ethos so ubiquitous in our culture is in fact elitist because it degrades work that is not done from love. It also ignores the idea that work itself possesses an inherent value, and most importantly, severs the traditional connection between work, talent and duty.

           

      When I am off campus and informally counseling economically challenged kids in Northfield, Mi….They are accustomed to doing whatever they need to do to help out their families.

             

      …You may [also] know the tale of Dr. John Kitchin, a.k.a. Slomo, who quit his medical practice for his true passion — skating along the boardwalk of San Diego’s Pacific Beach. But is it ethical for the doctor to put away his stethoscope and lace up his skates?     
           

      The universally recognized paragons of humanity — the Nelson Mandelas, Dietrich Bonhoeffers and Martin Luther Kings — did not organize their lives around self-fulfillment and bucket lists. They, no doubt, found a sense of meaning in their heroic acts of self-sacrifice, but they did not do what they were doing in order to achieve that sense of meaning. They did — like my father and some of those kids from town — what they felt they had to do.


      Photo credit:  Nelson Mandela - Flickr "South Africa The Good News" www.sagoodnews.co.za.jpg
       

       

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This article does a great job of asking, what's important and to whom, when making career decisions.  It also resonates in our family.  The author, Gordon Marino, is a professor of philosophy at St. Olaf College, the recent alma mater of my son, who now serves in the Navy. 
          
      My husband, a computer database administrator by day, had once considered the ministry as a profession.  He also found this article of interest. As for me, my first job fresh out of college was as a career advisor in a large university, after having worked as a work/study student in the same office for 3 years.  Professor Marino's highlights the tension of responsibility to the world as well as to ourselves.  This resonates with the his combo question of love, passion, fulfillment and duty - ALL a part of career choices, and perhaps a part of our hidden privilege or elitism.
             

      If this piece resonates with you, feel free to comment and/or pass it on. ~ Deb

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      9 Ways to Boost Meaning in Your Job - The New York Times & Jane Dutton, UMich

      9 Ways to Boost Meaning in Your Job - The New York Times & Jane Dutton, UMich | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      How to create meaningful work?  The real solution is to redesign work to make it fit our personal need for meaning, including CHANGING TASKS, RELATIONSHIPS and PERCEPTION.

      Pioneering psychologists like Amy Wrzesniewski, an associate professor at Yale, and Jane E. Dutton, a professor at the University of Michigan have been studying the nature of meaning at work for over a decade now. Their work is enabling us to begin to understand how we can take control of the meaning we experience at the office.

      In studying job crafting, the process of redesigning a job to boost meaning, they found that people could increase their sense of purpose by adjusting their tasks, relationships and approach to their work. These are all actions we can take in just about any job. They don't require re-writing your job description.


      ... job crafting...is used by the people who report the greatest meaning in their work.

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      When I look back on the most blissful, exciting, rewarding aspects of my work over the years, it does relate to creating the path, and emphasizing relationships and cultivating perceptions.  It's a helpful post about meaning-making in and through our careers. ~  D

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      Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally - Wall Street Journal

      Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally - Wall Street Journal | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally ~ Wall Street Journal.   Psychologists label five personality traits and explain which increase and decrease with age.

      _____________________
         
      "Many people become more agreeable, dependable and emotionally stable, and also more introverted." 

      _____________________
       

      But in a new twist with lots of ramifications for therapists, researchers have learned that being happy to begin with may help change your personality.
       

      A study published online in January in the Journal of Personality analyzed personality and well-being data from more than 16,000 Australians who were surveyed repeatedly between 2005 and 2009. The researchers found people who were happy in 2005 tended to become more emotionally stable, more conscientious, more agreeable and—perhaps most intriguingly—more introverted over the next four years.


      Via Santosh Kumar Nair
      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Helpful to know, and to understand, with age.  Heads up therapists!  It also is consistent with Jungian psychology.  ~  D

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      The Seven Year Rebound: Washtenaw County to add 12,500 jobs in the next three years

      The Seven Year Rebound:  Washtenaw County to add 12,500 jobs in the next three years | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      Washtenaw County is expected to add more than 12,500 jobs over the next three years, building on four consecutive years of steady job gains in the area - based on a 2014-2016 economic forecast conducted by University of Michigan economists George Fulton and Donald Grimes for The Ann Arbor News.

      ________________
         
      “We are diversifying...so that we are more resilient...a downturn...doesn’t cause the entire economy to turn in a negative direction.”

      ~ Paul Krutko, CEO, Economic Development,

          Ann Arbor SPARK
      ________________

           

      The jobs forecast is upbeat for the area; it shows Washtenaw County is in the midst of a seven-year economic rebound that will result in 31,147 job additions from the bottom of the downturn in 2009 through 2016.
       

      ….“…in the state and many of its constituent localities, they’re not even close to getting back all of the jobs being recovered, and (Washtenaw County has) and we’re gaining on top of that,” Fulton said in an interview.


      …employment in Washtenaw County has shifted dramatically since 1990...“a shift from a very predominantly manufacturing focused economy in the Ann Arbor region to one that, right now, is equal in terms of manufacturing and professional technical jobs,” said Paul Krutko, CEO of economic development group Ann Arbor SPARK.

       

      “We are diversifying our economy so that we are more resilient. If there’s a downturn in one area of the economy, it doesn’t cause the entire economy to turn in a negative direction,” he added.
       

      Read the full post here:


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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      This is great news, overall, for Washtenaw County, from economists with a great track record.  Barring any "Black Swan" events, the diversified economy that is developing should help this area be more resilient, and even more "Anti-Fragile"  (adaptive & sustainable) in years to come. ~  D

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      9 out of 10: Out of Work, Out of Benefits and Running Out of Options

      9 out of 10: Out of Work, Out of Benefits and Running Out of Options | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it
      Short-term unemployment has fallen to its prerecession level, but long-term unemployment remains more than twice as high as it was in 2007.

            

      ...New research by Alan B. Krueger, the former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, and his co-authors found that only one in 10 workers who had been unemployed over an extended period of time in a given month between 2008 and 2012 had returned to full-time work a year later.


      __________________________

           

      ...it also appears that employers discriminate against the already out-of-work... 

      __________________________

            

      In part, that might be because the long-term jobless become discouraged and reduce the intensity of their job searches. But it also appears that employers discriminate against the already out-of-work. Rand Ghayad, a researcher with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, performed a study showing that businesses were more likely to call back a working candidate with no relevant experience than a long-term jobless candidate with relevant experience.

      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      So many are struggling, and foreclosures continue.  This sheds new insights into the longer term underemployed and unemployed, especially those over 50.
           

      This is also a local phenomenon, sobering after seeing quote by an HR executive in a large, local institution who was quoted as part of a leadership panel as describing her desire to change the culture of employees keeping their jobs for a long period of time, a person herself having a long tenure with the institution.  
           
      Fresh faces and new, external experiences can add creativity and invigorate, which is so important to creating adaptive cultures. For a new perspective, take a look at Microsoft's restructuring to functions not divisions.  Here's  a sample quote:  "What is a system favoring careerism worth if it’s to the detriment of the rest of the company, of customers, of stakeholders ? Nothing."

      Yet, are executives helping exiting employees or simply taking the easier solutions of cutting jobs and adding to the problem rather than solving it?  ~  D

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      Dealing with Stupid Job Interview Questions & Soul-Crushing Jobs

      Dealing with Stupid Job Interview Questions & Soul-Crushing Jobs | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it

      "She could see ...that no one with spark and self-esteem would thrive in that company. ...It's not you... You are fine. It's the combination of talent-repelling job ads, Black Hole application systems, and thoughtless, soul-crushing interview processes that make a job search so hard on your emotions.


      __________________________
         

      ...you may get hired into a job that will suck your life force away. 
       
      __________________________

           

      ...They may ask you idiotic interview questions and work hard to make the relationship "I'm in charge - you're dogmeat" abundantly clear [in] your interview conversation.


      ...you may get hired into a job that will suck your life force away. 
       

      The good news is that slowly, the tide is turning. ...the pace of change toward a mojo-fueled work world has accelerated dramatically.


      Meanwhile, the stupid questions, include:  


      1. If you were an animal, what kind of animal would you be?
           

      2. With all the talented candidates, why should we hire you?
          
      3. What's your greatest weakness?

      YOU: Great question! I used to obsess about my weaknesses when I was younger. I took classes and read books ,,,then over time it occurred to me that I should be focusing on the things I do well, like designing financial reports. ...I steer myself toward the work that jazzes me and where I can make the biggest impact.

           

      4. Where do you see yourself in five years?

      Really, are people still hearing this ancient interview question in 2014? 

          

      Read the full article here.

            

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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      There are reasons certain jobs are repeatedly posted or stay open for as long as 6 months.  Liz Ryan's "Human Voice" interests includes creating more human and humane workplaces .  She helps put bureaucratic, low value interview processes in their place.  ~  D

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      Google's Interviewing Shift and 5 Culture Hiring Attributes. What Are Yours?

      Google's Interviewing Shift and 5 Culture Hiring Attributes. What Are Yours? | Careers & Self-Aware Strength | Scoop.it
      At Google, a set of five key attributes guides every hiring decision. You already have your own set of principles--you just have to identify them.

            

      Hiring is very serious business at Google. …Recently, Google dropped their famed complicated brainteasers, because they found out they were “a complete waste of time." …[Instead],they began conducting "structured behaviorial interviews" to learn more about candidates' real-world experience.


      _______________________
         

      4)  Humility to accept the better ideas of others and to take a strong position but then change in the face of new facts

          

      _______________________

       

           

      Google has a set of five hiring attributes it applies throughout the company:

            

      • 1)  The ability to learn and pull together disparate pieces of information on the fly
            
      • 2)  Emergent leadership, in which employees take leadership roles in a team when appropriate and then step back and let someone else lead
            
      • 3)  Ownership of work and projects
            
      • 4)  Humility to accept the better ideas of others and to take a strong position but then change in the face of new facts
           
      • 5)  Last, and least, is expertise, because the answers may be obvious to an intelligent person and habitual practice might skip useful new answers
            

      Copy[ing] Google's list [would be] nothing more than slavish imitation. …any company will likely have a set of personal characteristics that help employees succeed, given the industry and its maturation, business model, strategic imperatives, and other characteristics.

              

      ….Whatever the particular [success] mix is for your company, it already exists. …step back and see what [your successful staffers] have in common.


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      Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

      Behavioral interviewing has been around awhile.  I've taught it, I've been interviewed using it.  The key part of this piece is that Google is not innovating when it comes to their interviewing techniques, rather they are catching up - using success qualities, rather than expertise as a key differentiator of who and what is really important to YOUR company's success.  ~  D

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