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Un satélite de la NASA capta la contaminación ambiental en China

Un satélite de la NASA capta la contaminación ambiental en China | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
La enorme capa de contaminación que cubrió a Beijing fue captada por el satélite Terra de la agencia espacial estadounidense
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Training and Occupational Health Services

Training and Occupational Health Services | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
Safety Training and Occupational Health Services From TL Safety (Did we mention that @TLSafety provide occupational health services?

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Protecting Workers from Falls – Join the Campaign -- Occupational Health & Safety

Protecting Workers from Falls – Join the Campaign -- Occupational Health & Safety | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
Participants will learn how they can partner with the campaign and make preventing hazards within their reach.

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Apple supplier Foxconn hid underage workers before FLA inspection, says labor rights NGO

Apple supplier Foxconn hid underage workers before FLA inspection, says labor rights NGO | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Foxconn, the Chinese manufacturer that Apple heavily relies on for its products, may have tried to clean up its act before inspectors from the Fair Labor Association descended on its factories, according to a Hong Kong non-governmental organization dedicated to workers rights. Foxconn allegedly pushed underage employees out of sight before the FLA inspection, Debby Sze Wan Chan, a project officer from Students & Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior (SACOM), tells AppleInsider. “All underage workers, between 16-17 years old, were not assigned any overtime work and some of them were even sent to other departments,” workers from the Foxconn factories reportedly told Chan.


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Apple shareholders greeted with human rights protest

Apple shareholders greeted with human rights protest | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Protesters gather outside Apple headquarters before its annual shareholders meeting to decry the workplace conditions of the company's outsourcing factories 


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Children as young as 11 being exposed to poisonous chemicals in Bangladeshi tanneries

Children as young as 11 being exposed to poisonous chemicals in Bangladeshi tanneries | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

THE NEXT TIME you buy a pair of shoes or leather handbag check the label carefully. Goods from Bangladesh may have been made by children in a dangerous factory. A human rights group says workers in many leather tanneries in Bangladesh's capital are being exposed to serious health risks because of hazardous chemicals.


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Quebec asbestos mine won’t reopen, president says

Quebec asbestos mine won’t reopen, president says | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Canada’s last asbestos mine, the Jeffrey Mine in the Eastern Townships town of Asbestos, won’t reopen, its president said Wednesday in an interview with the newspaper La Tribune.

Bernard Coulombe got confirmation that a $58-million loan from the Quebec government that would have helped it reopen for the next 20 years has been cancelled, the Sherbrooke daily reported on its website. Cancelling the loan was an election promise of the Parti Québécois. Now that it has formed the new government, that promise has been met, Coulombe told the newspaper.




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Evaluating worker safety outside Canada

Evaluating worker safety outside Canada | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

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These are the clothing labels left behind in the Bangladesh factory fire that killed 112 workers

These are the clothing labels left behind in the Bangladesh factory fire that killed 112 workers | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Nov. 27 has been declared a day of national mourning in Bangladesh after this weekend's factory fire killed at least 112 workers. All of the country's roughly 4,500 garment factories will close for the day.


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Tokyo court orders state to pay ¥1 billion to compensate asbestos victims

Tokyo court orders state to pay ¥1 billion to compensate asbestos victims | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

The Tokyo District Court ordered the central government Wednesday to pay ¥1.06 billion in redress on behalf of workers who contracted asbestos-related diseases such as lung cancer at construction sites due to insufficient official countermeasures, but it let the makers of materials using the mineral off the hook.

It was the first ruling to acknowledge the state's responsibility among class-action lawsuits filed with six regional courts over construction workers' exposure to asbestos. In the first ruling on the lawsuits, the Yokohama District Court in May ruled totally against the plaintiffs.


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Samsung begins compensation talks with sick factory workers | ZDNet

Samsung begins compensation talks with sick factory workers  | ZDNet | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
South Korean giant initiates talks, which will begin in coming months, with local advocacy group supporting former employees who have contracted leukemia and other work-related diseases at Samsung plants.

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SELECCIÓN Y EMPLEO DEL EQUIPO PERSONAL DE PROTECCIÓN

SELECCIÓN Y EMPLEO DEL EQUIPO PERSONAL DE PROTECCIÓN | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
El primer factor que debe tener en cuenta la persona responsable de las actividades de seguridad e higiene del personal de una industria, es el de determinar la necesidad del empleo de un equipo personal de protección ...

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El entorno laboral puede incrementar el riesgo de cáncer de mama

El entorno laboral puede incrementar el riesgo de cáncer de mama | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
Un estudio realizado con más de 2.100 mujeres de Ontario, Canadá, 1.006 de ellas pacientes de cáncer de mama, ha revelado que el entorno laboral puede aumentar el riesgo de que las mujeres padezcan esta enfermedad.

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A Chinese Child’s Lung Cancer Is Linked to Pollution

A Chinese Child’s Lung Cancer Is Linked to Pollution | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
An eight-year-old Chinese girl was diagnosed with lung cancer that has been attributed to pollution. It’s one more tragic case in the building evidence of how air quality can affect health.
    

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The Crew's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:51 AM

My opinion on this is that it is tradgic . Air pollution is a bad thing over there i can see where you could get cancer . Everyday its like checking the weather but you had to check the smoke or smog. Im soglad we live in a place where this is not true. They depend on coal more than any one. This really needs to change. - Landon ;)

WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:54 AM

The ultimate sign that pollution gets to bad, is when eight year old begin to obtain cancer of the lungs. These Chinese people need to gather themselves together and either fix their pollution problem or create the cure to cancer. For the eight year olds.

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Los trabajadores de cementeras ponen en peligro su audición - hear-it.org

Los trabajadores de cementeras ponen en peligro su audición - hear-it.org | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
La incidencia de la pérdida de audición inducida por ruido entre los trabajadores de una cementera mexicana era del 55 por ciento. En algunas áreas de proceso la incidencia afectaba al 85 por ciento.

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Apple has incentive to worry about workers’ rights

Apple’s handling of the supply chain labour issues that continue to dog it a central concern not just for its own future but for the industry at large. Its scale and conspicuous brand have brought it unwelcome attention. But it is already ahead of its main rivals in trying to grapple with the underage labour, excessive forced overtime and inadequate safety standards that continue to be alleged against it, and the new standards it is helping to set will be felt across the industry.


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Apple plans environmental audits of China suppliers

Apple plans environmental audits of China suppliers | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Leading Chinese environmental activist says Apple has agreed to independent audits of at least two suppliers' factories in China. in China, the activists said. The reviews come as Apple (AAPL) faces rising criticism about toxic pollution and factory injuries at overseas suppliers' factories. Environmental examinations would be separate from an independent probe of working conditions at the Chinese factories of Apple suppliers, including Foxconn Technology, that began last week.


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Over 300 workers burned and suffocated to death - and a call for justice

 

The horror of it all is almost unimaginable.   Over 300 workers burned and suffocated to death in their workplaces, a garment factory and a shoe factory.     Some died while trying to jump out of windows to safety.     There were no emergency exits, no escape routes.   Not in Victorian England in the 19th century.  Not in New York City a century ago.   But this week, in the second decade of the twenty-first century.   They died in Karachi and in Lahore, making the garments and shoes that you may be wearing right now.   We honour the memory of those lives cut short by demanding justice --    an impartial inquiry into what happened - and punishing those at fault; compensation for the families of those killed and injured; and an investigation into the failures of those public authorities who should have been there to ensure the workers' safety.   The unions in Pakistan are asking us all to take a minute and send off our messages of protest to the Prime Minister.   Pakistan: Make textile factories safe

 

Go to the LabourStart Campaign page and sign the petition http://www.labourstartcampaigns.net/show_campaign.cgi?c=1570&src=lsmm

 


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20 Chinese coal miners dead, 14 injured, in carriage crash

20 Chinese coal miners dead, 14 injured, in carriage crash | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

A steel cable broke as it was pulling two carriages at a coal mine in northwest China on Tuesday, killing 20 workers and injuring 14.The injured were transported to a hospital, including three who were in a serious condition


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Fukushima: Asbestos high in quake zone / Excessive levels of hazardous material found at demolition sites « Set You Free News

Fukushima: Asbestos high in quake zone / Excessive levels of hazardous material found at demolition sites « Set You Free News | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

As of last month, asbestos levels exceeding the World Health Organization’s safety limit were detected in 14 cases at sites where buildings damaged by last year’s Great East Japan Earthquake were being demolished, according to a government study.


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Worked to death

Worked to death | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Thousands of foreign workers have died in Malaysia in recent years from accidents, illnesses and suicide. They work in so-called '3D' conditions - dirty, dangerous and difficult.
 

Critics say the death rate is a result of slack safety standards, poor housing conditions and weak enforcement of laws to protect them. Last year, more than 1,000 foreign workers died from accidents, illnesses and suicide. Malaysia is the largest importer of labour inAsia. Migrant workers provide cheap labour in construction, manufacturing and plantation industries. There are more than three million foreign workers, of which nearly a third is undocumented. Most of the migrant workers come from Bangladesh, India, Indonesia and Nepal.


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Hard work, accidents and illness

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Garment workers’ procession demanding Ensure ‘Safe Workplace’ & “ Trade Union Rights” in Garment industry

Garment workers’ procession demanding Ensure ‘Safe Workplace’ & “ Trade Union Rights” in Garment industry | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it

Garment workers Yesterday , January 14, 2013, brought out a procession in Dhaka city demanding assurance for ‘safe workplace’ & “ trade union rights “ in Garment industry in Bangladesh. Over 100 garment workers, mostly women, took part in the procession organized by National Garment Workers Federation (NGWF). The workers, during the procession, carried placard & festoons on different demands, including ‘safe workplace’ & trade union rights. The procession began from in front of the National Press Club and concluded at the Paltan Crossing after parading High Court and Topkhana Road. A short rally was held in front of the National Press Club in Dhaka city before the procession. NGWF President Amirul Haque Amin presided over the rally that was addressed by NGWF General Secretary Ms Safia Parveen & Central leaders Md Faruq Khan, Ms Sultana Akter, Ms Jesmin Akter, Md Kabir Hossain, Ms Nazneen Akter and Md Rafiq, among others. The speakers said that 55 serious factory fires taken place in Bangladesh Garment sector since 1990. In these fires, 566 garment workers were killed while several thousands were injured—some of them became permanently retarded physically. Besides, 64 garment workers were killed in Spectrum Garments factory collapse in 2005. But, ‘safe workplace’ and health & safety for garment workers were not ensured till now. The speakers demanded to establish ‘safe workplace’ in Garment industry for the workers. They stressed the need for joint initiative of the factory owners, government, buyers and trade union organization in this regard. Expressing resentment, the speakers said, “ A ‘Memorandum of Understanding on Health & Safety’ was prepared two years back at a workshop, organized by jointly by BGMEA & trade union organizations. The workshop was attended by the representatives of the government and buyers. It was decided, at the workshop, that all buyers (sourcing companies) shall sign the ‘Memorandum of Understanding on Health & Safety’. But till now, no buyers other than PVH & TCHIBO signed this document. It is imperative for all buyers to sign this document and ensure health & safety of the garment workers in Bangladesh.” Expressing anger, the speakers said, “ Formation of trade union organization is allowed in the garment sector although trade union right is a basic right of the workers. Unrestricted trade union rights should be given immediately in the Garment sector.” Press Secretary, NGWF January 15, 2013.


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Invisible Victims of Development

 

Foreword  Just as this report was being printed, in the space of three months two devastating fires engulfed garment factories in Karachi and Dhaka, killing more than 500 workers, tragedies that rank not only as the worst industrial disasters to occur in Pakistan and Bangladesh but in the whole of Asia. The Asian Network for the Rights of Occupational and Environmental Victims (ANROEV) -a network linking more than 14 Asian countries, was founded following two identical devastating fires almost two decades ago – in Kader in Thailand and in Zhili in China, which killed more than 260 workers. The network started as accident victims’ network, reflecting the real situation in Asia when accidents were a daily occurrence and occupationaldiseases, even though present in large numbers, did not take priority because of their invisibility. Over the years the network has taken a more comprehensive approach and more occupational disease victims have become part of it, something reflected in its new name as stated above. Just when we thought we had buried the ghosts of the past, the Karachi and Dhaka fires have brought the nightmare back, and this time it is even more painful. History keeps repeating itself in very gruesome ways. We cannot control fires, as accidents happen. However, these fires should not have killed so many workers; fire safety is the minimal basic requirement that workers deserve from their employers. The need to provide a safe fire escape route has been well known since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire in New York more than a century ago in 1911. Any deaths occurring in an operation that does not provide such a passage or makes existing facilities impassable henceforth should be seen as ‘murder’ and not an accident. The perpetrators, including the manufacturers, the brands, regulators (governments) aswell as the self-regulatory monitors and auditors who certify a premise as ‘safe’ need to be held criminally responsible. This report is dedicated to all those victims who have lost their lives to fire in Karachi, Dhaka and many other places, to victims who have died due to cancer from working in electronics factories from Korea to Indonesia, to victims who died due to their lungs being clogged with silica and to those who died of cancers contracteddue to deadly asbestos. This book also salutes the survivors and their families, who struggle every day for justice and a hope that no one else faces the same fate, that workplaces become clean, and that history does not repeat itself again. Introduction By Omana George and Sanjiv Pandita Background
Occupational safety and health is one of the most serious issues impacting the working population of developing Asian countries. The ‘shining’ and ‘growing’ Asia has a darker side, glimpses of which often appears in the media in reports of exploitative conditions in ‘sweatshops’ or the hazardous working conditions in workplaces, ranging from mines in China to ship breaking in Bangladesh and gem polishing in India. However, these storie often come and go as ‘news flashes’ and rarely offer deeper insights into the enormity or the magnitude of the problem. The key question remains how serious is the problem and how to quantify what is a ‘bad situation’, especially when developing Asian countries maintain little if any credible data on deaths, injuries and sickness due to work. Some idea of the gravity of the situation comes from the International Labour Organisation (ILO) - a specialized wing of the United Nations, which puts the death toll in Asia at an alarming 1.1 million annually. However, the ILO figure is a projected one, derived from a mathematical model using the existing data from industrialized countries in absence of data from the workplace in Asia. Manycritics believe this is just a conservative estimate as the projection does not take into account the real working conditions on the ground. There is no denying the fact that Asia is facing an epidemic of work-related deaths and diseases, and exposure to work hazards is one of the leading causes of preventable death, injury and sickness. Yet, the sick, injured and the dead workers and their families remain invisible, hidden behind a thick veil of secrecy and denial, and thus they are denied of justice and rehabilitation and form the most marginalized section of the society. Genesis of the Report
This report is an attempt by the Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC) to portray the real situation of OSH on the ground and what workers, victims and their families have to go through in six Asian countries, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, India, Philippines and Thailand. The report has been prepared in collaboration with the Asian Network for the Rights of Occupational and Environmental Victims (ANROEV) – a network of victims groups, trade unions, labour and environmental organizations based in 16 Asian countries all working towards creating safe and healthy workplaces, OSH rights and environmental justice. The need for the present report emerged during the ANROEV annual meeting in 2008, when grassroots groups, frustrated by years of apathy by the government and the functioning of businesses with impunity, decided to produce their own report to show the extent of the problem at ground level with a hope this might help draw some public attention to a very serious problem. However, it has not been easy as the country reports have been prepared predominantly by practitioners and activists who are engaged in an ‘epic’ struggle. The six member countries of ANROEV who contributed to this report, presented their initial findingsin November 2011 during the annual meeting of the ANROEV network in Jaipur, India,where they also sought further input from members from other countries. Enriched with case studies, the reports also offer a glimpse into the lives and struggles of the workers, victims and their families and show the real people present and missing, behind the numbers. Though the report is based on the situation of six Asian countries, covering more than half of Asia’s population, yet it is reflective, to a large extent, of the general situation in the whole of Asia. Key Findings Cost of DevelopmentThe ‘Right to life’ is the most precious, fundamental human right enshrined under various UN conventions and in the constitutions of the countries in the region, and yet it is being denied constantly. Over the past few decades countries in Asia have embraced the model of export- led development which focuses on growth at all costs. As explained by Voravidh Charoenloet and Somboon Srikomdokcare in their report on Thailand, the model is based on attracting investment by lowering labour standards, in particular allowing low wages, long working hours and flexible labour relations. The whole process is dehumanising as workers are rendered mere ‘objects’ in the process. Where as the economic data is projected quarterly to lure more investment, the workers impacted are simply forgotten, their cases of exploitation, injury and even death are swept under the carpet. Underreporting and lack of dataThe lack of clear and credible data is reflected in all six country reports. For example in the Philippines, as explained by Noel Colina in his report, the figures on OSH are available arbitrarily once every four years, and there is no data available for the ‘in between’ missing years; the latest available data is for the year 2007 and it was only released in 2010. “We can compare, for example, data for the years 2003 and 2007, but we need to guess what happened to workers in the intervening years” observes Noel. The problem does not stop here, since even the available data is in parts and is inconsistent. As evidenced in the report on India by Jagdish Patel and Mohit Gupta, apart from the discrepancies in the collected data by various agencies, the figures are too low to capture the reality on the ground. For example the fatal accident figure available for India, under various agencies ranges from 400 to 1,000. In a country of 1 billion, this is hardly credible, especially when the ILO’s projection of 40,000 is considered. In Indonesia, as observed by Muchamad Darisman in his report, the figures are grossly underreported. Even though one government official statement acknowledged nine workers die everyday due to accidents, yet the datareflects the situation only in the ‘registered’ units and the majority of the workplaces are notregistered. Even those registered do not report. In the case of China, the situation is no different, but the scale is much bigger due to its distinction of being the ‘world’s factory’ as reported by Becky Fung and Francine Chan in their report. China accounts for nearly half of Asia’s work-related fatalities and it is not only because of its large workforce but also due to a very high accident rate that, according to the ILO, is nearly 3 times that of the United States. The report observes that official data only reflect ‘the tip of the iceberg’ as data of many workers, especially the migrant workers, is not recorded. In Cambodia, where the reporting mechanism is relatively new compared to the other countries, the official data is neither comprehensive neither reflective of the situation in the country, as observed by Bronh Sopheana and Choeung Theany in their report. Only data from accidents in the formal registered units in and around Phnom Penh is reflected in official reports. The OSH situation in the rest of the country remains a big unknown. Legal coverage and lack of implementation of lawsThe reports provide a good overview of legal coverage in the six countries and it is evident all countries have framed some form of laws. These can be classified into two main categories- the first type intends to prevent exposure to hazard or harm and protect workers, that includes various regulations and codes for businesses; the second type offer assistance, relief, and treatment for workers who may get injured or sick at the workplace – this includes laws oncompensation and also social security. However, as will be seen one of the major problems reported in all of them is the coverage is often quite limited. Most of the laws do not cover all the workers. In fact in most of the cases, the majority of workers remain uncovered as the protection is often restricted to the formal registered units, and since majority of workers in these countries work in the informal sector,they remain excluded from the framework of laws. The second major issue remains the implementation of the laws and there are often many government bodies, ministries and agencies involved in the implementation. As reflected in the reports from China and India, it always creates overlapping roles and responsibilities and often confusion. There is also a problem of insufficient and proper resources and personal from the implementing institutions. For example, what is emerging universally is the number of inspectors is far too few to handle the number of factories they have to inspect. It is not humanly possible for them to inspect all the factories, so enforcement remains weakas most of the factories cannot be inspected. There is also the issue of the capacity of the inspectors due to a lack of adequate training as expressed in the Cambodia report. Instead of strengthening the inspections and increasing the number of inspectors some of the countries are trying to dismantle this institution by drying up the funds previously budgeted and further reducing the number of inspectors. This is evident from the reports from the Philippines and India. In both these countries government is promoting ‘self-regulation’ and in Philippines companies who have self regulatory standards are even exempt from the inspections.  Trade unions in other parts of the world play a major role in the implementation of the laws and ensuring safety at the workplace. However, the level of unionization in all the countries surveyed is very low and ranges between four and eight percent, In China, there is an additional problem to do with the legitimacy of the single union, the All China Federation of Trade Unions (ACFTU), as it is not seen as representative of the workers. Occupational diseases and issues of diagnosisIt is evident from all the reports, that while accidents which are ‘visible’ and obvious remain grossly underreported and neglected, the situation as regards occupational diseases is even worse. The ILO maintains that accidents represent less than a quarter of the total work-related fatalities and occupational diseases account for most of them. Yet it is hardly indicative from the data from these six countries. In fact, the data on occupational diseases in most of the countries is non-existent. For example, in India the Indian Labour Year Book 2005 mentions only 7 cases of occupational disease for that year. In Indonesia and Cambodia there is no data available on occupational diseases at all. This is representative of a fatal flaw in strategies of addressing this issue. Occupational diseases impact millions of workers in Asia: However, unlike accidents an occupational disease or illness develops over a period of time. Diagnosis of occupationa diseases also remains a major issue of concern, with a lack of trained doctors capable of diagnosing these problems and conditions and their access to the workers. Yet workers are suffering which is evident from the case studies in the reports. Workers’ compensation and social securityIt emerges quite clearly from all the reports the difficulties that sick and injured workers face in getting compensation. As mentioned earlier, the majority of workers do not take this course as they are not covered by any insurance plan. Even the workers who are covered find the process very difficult and cumbersome. It emerges from the reports, that in some countries, such as China and India, workers find it difficult even to prove their employment as there are no employment contracts. The process to claim compensation is also very complicated, and cumbersome and puts a lot of pressure on the already sick and injured workers and their families. Diagnosis remains a major issue as it is the first step to prove the sickness or injury and its origin in the workplace. It is also reflected that the diagnostic process is not a fair process, and employers often interfere with the process as it can raise the issues of liability. Many migrant workers are fired once they are sick as reflected in report from China, and they go back to their home town without claiming any compensation. This type of mistreatment has been reported by workers in other parts of Asia also. Workers who manage to cross these hurdles and secure compensation, find the amount of compensation is not fair and often findit difficult to have a decent living on that amount, especially considering that many of them have spent a large amount on their treatment, a process can take many years. Profits out of misery
The institutions that administer workers’ compensation and social security funds amass huge profits managing and investing the contributions from employers and sometimes from the workers. This money that is intended for their compensation and medical treatment keeps on accumulating as evident considering the number of workers that are compensated. This is reflected in JAMSOSTEK – social security institution in Indonesia, ESI in India and also in China. The fund administrators often find it lucrative to invest the funds for higher returns rather than compensating the workers. Conclusion
Workers have paid the ‘ultimate price’ all through the history of industrial growth. The year 2011 was the centenary anniversary of the infamous ‘Triangle Fire’ which engulfed the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York in March 1911, killing 146 garment workers, most of them whom were women. It was and continues to be one of the worst industrial disasters. In similar situations, thousands of workers have died due to exposure to harmful substances, mothers have passed these hazards onto unborn children in electronics factories from Silicon Valley in California to plants in Scotland; and fathers have clogged their lungs with asbestos fibers and even brought it home in their clothing, devastating whole families. The effects ofthese past exposures reverberate even now in these countries, and even though many of the harmful chemicals have either been nationally banned or reduced, including asbestos which is banned in more than 90 countries worldwide. In spite of so much death and destruction around the world in the past, it seems few lessons have been learned in Asia. In 1992, a fire in the Kader Toy factory, also known as the Triangle Fire of Asia, killed more than 188 workers, mostly women. As in the Triangle factory, the doors in the Kader factory were locked, too. Factory fires in Bangladesh continue even now to kill hundreds every year. Asia also continues to use hazardous substances as part of its manufacturing processes, even when those substances have been banned in the West. Asbestos is one glaring example. Asia is the largest consumer of asbestos in the world,accounting for 45 percent of world demand. Victims organising has been crucial in Asia in demanding justice and there have been some victories in different parts of Asia, including China, where victims have led the fight and won. These victories, though small, are vital in the long struggle for rights. They also emphasize the importance of victims’ empowerment in the attainment of rights. As history shows, OSH rights were attained after a long struggle by victims. Black, white and brown lung associations in the US epitomized those struggles. Historically and even now, it is the power of collective organizing that brings justice. At the workplace, workers need a union; in the community, what is needed is a unity of residents together with those who have been worst affected. At all times, victims and their families should be given priority in representation. Victims’ organizing in Asia is truly as critical now as ever. There have been enough needless deaths and we hope that history does not need to repeat itself again. The chapters have been uploaded seperately and there are 6 countries covered in this publication namely - Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand.


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An article to think

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Tjc ChinaStudies's curator insight, July 5, 2015 10:39 PM

Migrant workers in China lacks social insurance coverage. Coverage also does not equate to compensation for migrant workers. Despite coverage in workplace injury insurance, migrant workers are not able to claim compensation due to complex claiming process, difficulty in trying to prove sickness or injury and its origins from the workplace. Employers interfering with the claiming process also results in lack of ability of migrant workers to claim compensation. Often, migrant workers are fired upon discovery of sickness, leaving the workplace with no compensation. Those who were able to claim compensation also found compensation to be less than satisfactory.  

 

Wan Ting 25/14

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LA IMPORTANCIA DEL EQUIPO DE PROTECCIÓN PERSONAL

Este puede salvarnos la vida ante un accidente o una enfermedad producida por el trabajo.

Via Franco Lugo Ponce
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La OIT denuncia el riesgo de abuso laboral de los becarios

La OIT denuncia el riesgo de abuso laboral de los becarios | Seguridad industrial | Scoop.it
Recursos Humanos Digital La Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT) denunció el riesgo de abuso al que están expuestos los jóvenes en prácticas formativas en un momento en el que esta opción laboral parece la única posible y los jóvenes en...

Via Liliana Del Rosso Beltramone
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