Segregation in America
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Black Codes

Black Codes | Segregation in America | Scoop.it

These laws had the intent and the effect of restricting African Americans' freedom, and of compelling them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt.

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Jim Crow Laws

Jim Crow Laws | Segregation in America | Scoop.it

Jim Crow Laws  were racial segregation laws that basically said some forms of discrimination were okay, legal and perfectly acceptable.

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"It was truly separate, but certainly not equal"

"It was truly separate, but certainly not equal" | Segregation in America | Scoop.it

ON MAY 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that everyone, theoretically, would receive the same public services (schools, hospitals, prisons, etc.), but that there would be separate distinct facilities for each race.


Via Meredith Maya Abood
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Meredith Maya Abood's curator insight, December 25, 2013 4:33 AM

"the railroad tracks in merced established critical boundaries in the 1950s and beyond. It was the dividing line between blacks and whites, opportunity and despair. While there was no sign at the track saying 'whites only' or 'coloreds only', there were signs of a divided community...there were no signs stopping us, but we knew we didn't belong in certain places. You didn't have to tell us twise" pg 23

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Segregation academies

Segregation academies | Segregation in America | Scoop.it

Central Delta Academy in Inverness, Mississippi was a segregation academy.

 


Segregation academies (also called seg academies) are private schools in the United States that functioned during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s as a way for white parents to avoid the desegregation of public schools as a result of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education.

Because Brown did not apply to private schools, the creation of segregation academies was a way to keep segregation intact.

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