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Rescooped by Emma Lafleur from Geography Education
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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

This article touches base on a couple of topics. First, it illustrates how the one-child policy affected China. Culturally, China had a preference for boys, so the one-child policy created a great gender imbalance. There are more men than women in China, this means that not all men can get married in China because there are not enough women. Also, women now have an upper-hand because they can ask for money, a car, and an appartment from their future husbands before getting married because there are so few women, and men now have to work their whole lives to save of the money for these bride prices. This brings up a second topic. Since the men have to work harder to save money, they help China's economy. The economy is already getting better there, but these bride prices are making the economy rise faster. Therefore, the one child policy had both negative and positive effects on China, and some couples now want daughters instead of sons because they are less expensive. Economically, there is now a preference for girls. This could be a good model for the effects of trying to control population growth.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

Rescooped by Emma Lafleur from Geography Education
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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

    AIDS is spreading rapidly in Africa, and sometimes it seems as though no one is really doing anything to help. Botswana shows that there is a way to help and there is a way to lessen the impact that AIDS has on people's lives through government funded treatments.

     Botswana has spent a lot of money on HIV/AIDS research and treatments for their citizens, and the spread of the disease has drastically gone down since they have started their fight against it. They have especially decreased the AIDS tranmission from mother to child, so that the children born in the country have a better chance of surviving, and are not born with a death sentence. Also, people are living longer because less people are getting the disease and the people who do get the disease have access to the treatments that allow them to live longer.

      The access of medicine not only has an impact on the health of the country, it has an impact of each an every part. Since people live longer, there are more people working and building the economy and making the country better, and the society and country are more stable because there aren't so many people dying and so much fear about contracting AIDS.

      Also, other countries can look to Botswana as an example of how they can help their people, and the spread of AIDS can decrease across the continent. However, Botswana is a richer country because it has diamond reserves while other countries are poorer and may not be able to buy the medicines for all of the people. In addition, Botswanna is in the southern part of Africa and it has not been greatly affected by the Arab Spring. The countries that have had recent revolutions also may not be able to help with AIDS because they need to create stability and build governments first. Therefore, Botswana is a great step in the right direction and is a good model for other countries to follow, but there is a long way to go before the AIDS epidemic slows down.

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Rescooped by Emma Lafleur from Geography Education
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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

The middle school girls in this article show a lot of hope and confidence for change while their society may change more slowly than they would like. These girls are capable of great things and should be given the opportunities to be great, but they instead live in fear of the Taliban for killing them just because they want an education and have few job opportunities unless they can pay their way. In Pakistan, this is one of the first generation of girls who are being educated. Education is extremely important for them because they can finally fight for their rights and equality.

    English philosopher John Stuart Mill argued that women should have education and equality because society cannot progress without the women. Society cannot expect to progress while they oppress half of their population, women are needed in order to move forward and develop. The girls in the article state the same thing, they know that they can help their country and that they can change their society. They will have to start small, but one day women in Pakistan will have equality. These girls are one step along the road.

    Finally, the Taliban attack on Malala for her education has publicized this whole ordeal, and although this murder of an innocent child is saddening and terrible it has gotten people to finally notice what is going on for girls in Pakistan and people are finally noticing what the Taliban is doing. Hopefully, the government can make the right choices to help these girls grow and learn and be safe in their homes. Women of many cultures, including our own, have had to go through fights like these. Maybe Pakistan will be the next big chapter in the world's history of gender equality.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Rescooped by Emma Lafleur from Geography Education
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Kabul, A City Stretched Beyond Its Limits

Decades of war, migration and chaotic sprawl have turned the Afghan capital into a barely functioning dust bowl. The city's tired infrastructure is crumbling; water, sewers and electricity are in short supply.

 

Keeping an urban system running smoothly is a difficult proposition in developed countries that are stable--what is in like a place like Afghanistan?  This podcast is a excellent glimpse into the cultural, economic, environmental and political struggles of a city like Kabul.  This is urban geography in about a problematic a situation as possible.   


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

Once again, when most people think of the Middle East, they think of war and the dangers of being there. What they don't usually think of is how these wars affect the people. The environment of the Middle East is already harsh with limited access to water, becoming more so with shrinking rivers and lakes across the region. Then you add war to the mix so that governments focus their energy on fighting and have very little time to try to help the people. Consequently, we have places like Kabul that is crumbling and can barely support its people. People can just barely make ends meet week to week, they have very little. This isn't just some city in Afghanistan either, it is the capital. People everywhere are suffering from war and harsh climates, Kabul is just an example.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 12:38 PM

Afghanistan's capital city of Kabul has seen a population influx due to war refugees and people trying to find more opportunity.  However, this desert region cannot support all these people, especially now that many of the resources have been used up.  There isn't much food, electricity, and water.  Many resources have to be shipped in from private vendors, making it even more expensive.  The government does not help and people cannot afford to leave (those that can leave typically perpetuate "brain-drain" in the area).  However, overlooking the cityscape are "Poppy Houses" and other developments, which are gated, developed communities build on money from the opium trade and which have access to water.  This illustrates the global pattern of the rich benefiting at the poor's expense.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 21, 4:27 PM

NPR frequently has stories that are not always popularized in the mainstream media and I applaud their efforts for that. I believe this piece is no exception. We so often do not think of the pressure growing populations and modernization have on a city's infrastructure. This is especially true in a city like Kabul.Kabul is the capital of war torn Afghanistan and it is crumbling. Afghanistan has been enduring a civil war since 1978.70% of the country is considered desolate.Growing populations,war,sewage,cars and lack of space are creating for a difficult environment. Due to poverty many can not leave. Some homes can have up to 20 people living in them at once.Drugs and  prostitution are one the rise and crime is regular. Traffic is over flowing on mostly dirt roads. It may take hours to cross from one end of the city to another.However there is some hope.Some residents are investing more in their homes in the absence of fear of loosing them to the government.Highrises are being built. If residents have the means then they are able to afford more opportunities.Many wealthy people are able to leave the regular neighborhoods and travel to gated communities. The only time people will have to leave is to go to the city center. Despite the slight improvements for some,Kabul is definitely a city stretched to it's limits.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 6:28 PM

(Central Asia topic 1 {5 topics from here & 5 from Russia merged})

I see a few similarities between what Kabul has experienced and the "favelas" in South America. Both experience a major lack of infrastructure, government support, and an increase in small, crowded, unstable housings. However, Kabul seems to be taking at least a small step forward, economically and spatially speaking. The video mentions how on the undeveloped periphery of the city, large developments have begun to take root. Being able to plan ahead allows for more efficiency and simplicity. One small example would be that of roads: why continue to put up with crowded, narrow,  winding streets (like those found throughout Boston and Providence historical areas) when wider, straighter, more accommodating ways can be had (like the perfectly straight, right-angled streets of more 'planned-out' cities of Las Vegas and Phoenix).