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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

It will take a long time for Saudi women to have full rights, but this is a step in the right direction.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 9:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:49 PM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

Times are changing in India, the country is becoming more western and adopting more western ideals, but change does not come all at once. In cities women are becoming educated and getting good jobs, but just outside there are still traditional rural areas. In these areas, women stay inside and sometimes cover their faces, and are obedient to the men around them. In the city, women go out at night and are more independent. This leads to problems because men of these villages will abuse and rape these independent women and will feel justified in their actions because there is no reason for a woman to be out unless they are a prostitute. Women try to gain independence and freedom, but are in danger because those around them still believe that they have no right and do not belong in the city, working.

   Also, these rape crimes go unpunished many times because rape in India makes a woman unpure and she becomes victimized and some women commit suicide after rape because of the stress that comes from the rape itself and from the society's view of her as a rape victim.

    Rape is a growing problem all over the world, with people disagreeing on the fundamental question of what qualifies as rape. However, in India it is a large problem because there are almost two societies because the country is changing and women do not know how to live in both societies, they can either have all of the freedom and independence, or none of it. They are gaining their self-independence and will soon get all of it, but some people are still trying to hold them back.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:50 AM

The rapid modernization of India along with the rural attitudes and male centric society makes it difficult for women who are raped to get justice.  Mostly because to come forward as a rape victim will take their honor away.  If they have to admit it happened then their lives will be ruined.  Even when their family stands behind them, the women are in fear and one almost killed herself because she felt pressured to testify.  The men who rape these women are from the small villages around the area and feel free to do as they please because they do not fear that their victims will report the abuse.  Things will not change until attitudes towards women and rape change in this area. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

The middle school girls in this article show a lot of hope and confidence for change while their society may change more slowly than they would like. These girls are capable of great things and should be given the opportunities to be great, but they instead live in fear of the Taliban for killing them just because they want an education and have few job opportunities unless they can pay their way. In Pakistan, this is one of the first generation of girls who are being educated. Education is extremely important for them because they can finally fight for their rights and equality.

    English philosopher John Stuart Mill argued that women should have education and equality because society cannot progress without the women. Society cannot expect to progress while they oppress half of their population, women are needed in order to move forward and develop. The girls in the article state the same thing, they know that they can help their country and that they can change their society. They will have to start small, but one day women in Pakistan will have equality. These girls are one step along the road.

    Finally, the Taliban attack on Malala for her education has publicized this whole ordeal, and although this murder of an innocent child is saddening and terrible it has gotten people to finally notice what is going on for girls in Pakistan and people are finally noticing what the Taliban is doing. Hopefully, the government can make the right choices to help these girls grow and learn and be safe in their homes. Women of many cultures, including our own, have had to go through fights like these. Maybe Pakistan will be the next big chapter in the world's history of gender equality.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

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Daily Life in Afghanistan

Daily Life in Afghanistan | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
We tend to look at Afghanistan through the lens of conflict, with good reason. Deaths of American forces recently reached 2000 in the 11 years since US involvement in the country began.

 

Yes, Afghanistan is a war-ravaged country; but it is also a place that families call home and where children play.  This photo essay is a nice glimpse into ordinary lives in Central Asia.

 

Tags: Afghanistan, images, culture, Central Asia. 


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

Whenever we get a glimpse of Afghanistan in the news or in a movie, all we see are pictures of war. These photos show a different side of Afghanistan, a more real Afghanistan. Many people live in Afghanistan and many children call it home. Not everyone in the country are fighting in wars, some are just trying to live a peaceful life. It is good to see ordinary life of an ordinary person from a country like this, because we so often know nothing of it, and assume that all people in a war-ravaged country are constantly fighting and running. Assumptions like this make it hard to have good relations with other countries, because if we assume the worst, we can never learn and understand the people of another country. These pictures are a good way to get a small glimpse of what life is like in Afghanistan.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:08 AM

Photo essays are so interesting because they consist of photos that tell a story of their own.  This one is especially interesting because we learn about the daily lives of average, ordinary citizens living in Afghanistan.  We get to see pieces of their day-to-day lives, which we do not get to see in any news broadcasts where the focus is only on war.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:14 PM

These photos are beautiful in their own way because they show the simplicity of life in Afghanistan for the common people who were not Taliban extremists, but rather peaceful Muslims living day to day.  The landscape and housing on hills is similar to the favelas in Brazil as most of the Afghan population lives below the poverty line but this photo essay exemplifies the lives of the average people.

There is a photograph of a woman during a protest for violence against women which is still a very common problem in this region but the photo also exhibits that people are fighting it and it is no longer being covered up and quietly accepted.

Afghanistan is not just desert with U.S. soldiers riding through it heavily armed, it is home to people who want nothing more than live in peace.

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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

    AIDS is spreading rapidly in Africa, and sometimes it seems as though no one is really doing anything to help. Botswana shows that there is a way to help and there is a way to lessen the impact that AIDS has on people's lives through government funded treatments.

     Botswana has spent a lot of money on HIV/AIDS research and treatments for their citizens, and the spread of the disease has drastically gone down since they have started their fight against it. They have especially decreased the AIDS tranmission from mother to child, so that the children born in the country have a better chance of surviving, and are not born with a death sentence. Also, people are living longer because less people are getting the disease and the people who do get the disease have access to the treatments that allow them to live longer.

      The access of medicine not only has an impact on the health of the country, it has an impact of each an every part. Since people live longer, there are more people working and building the economy and making the country better, and the society and country are more stable because there aren't so many people dying and so much fear about contracting AIDS.

      Also, other countries can look to Botswana as an example of how they can help their people, and the spread of AIDS can decrease across the continent. However, Botswana is a richer country because it has diamond reserves while other countries are poorer and may not be able to buy the medicines for all of the people. In addition, Botswanna is in the southern part of Africa and it has not been greatly affected by the Arab Spring. The countries that have had recent revolutions also may not be able to help with AIDS because they need to create stability and build governments first. Therefore, Botswana is a great step in the right direction and is a good model for other countries to follow, but there is a long way to go before the AIDS epidemic slows down.

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

This article touches base on a couple of topics. First, it illustrates how the one-child policy affected China. Culturally, China had a preference for boys, so the one-child policy created a great gender imbalance. There are more men than women in China, this means that not all men can get married in China because there are not enough women. Also, women now have an upper-hand because they can ask for money, a car, and an appartment from their future husbands before getting married because there are so few women, and men now have to work their whole lives to save of the money for these bride prices. This brings up a second topic. Since the men have to work harder to save money, they help China's economy. The economy is already getting better there, but these bride prices are making the economy rise faster. Therefore, the one child policy had both negative and positive effects on China, and some couples now want daughters instead of sons because they are less expensive. Economically, there is now a preference for girls. This could be a good model for the effects of trying to control population growth.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 

 

Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

This is a great map showing the spread of the Muslim Brotherhood across the Middle East and North Africa. It shows those countries who do like it, and those who do not. The reasons for which a country either likes or dislikes them gives insight into the culture and government of that country, and this map can give some insight into the future influences of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.

 

Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

First, this shows how India has changed. Many people left India in search of a new life and jobs and the opportunities promised in Great Britain and America. However, one generation later, the immigrants children are moving back to India. India is becoming more Western and its economy is growing and therefore has a lot of opportunities and in many ways more opportunities than America and Great Britain. Parents moved out of India for a better life and children are now moving to India for a better life. India is growing, and it is growing rapidly.

     Also, the article shows how children of immigrants are almost at a disadvantage because they are seen as Indian in the eyes of the British or Americans, but they are not truly Indian because they do not know the full culture as their parents do. It is a new situation for many children, and it has both advantages and disadvantages. They grow up with a snapshot of the culture of their parents at home, but with western culture in school. They know that they are Indian in ethnicity, but they do not really know the culture so they move to India to learn where they come from.

    Finally, India is moving toward becoming a new developed country and a real power in the world. They have a lot of people and the resources to do so. Both Great Britain and America are invested in India as they give many children of Indian immigrants visas to live in India and start companies and help build that country. However, although India is growing, it still has a lot of problems. India has a very large population that the government has trouble supporting so there is a large portion of the population in poverty. These people moving back to India may be able to help out with this problem because they have the resources to start new companies and create more jobs. Overall, this teamwork between America, Great Britain, and India, I think, will benefit India greatly because it will help India grow more and it will help these people find their identities.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 5:13 PM

There is a rising number of Indian origin born in the west that are moving back to India. One reason would be India's economy is growing faster then the US and England's. India has many more opportunities for new wealth and it is attracting the young entrepreneurs as well. Another reason they are moving back is for cultural connection that they are not recieving where they are now. Many have said that they are looked at as different and not accepted and that is why they want to go back to India, so that they feel that acceptance. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:43 PM

This article demonstrates the need to leave and create a better life for not only this family but for other families that feel as if their life and societial views are putting their future in jeapody. There is a rising number of people from India that are moving to the West; where their parents were born and restaring their lives there. They are in a sense coming home to what they had left behind.

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

I have a great interest in both history and anthropology, and how what happened in the past affects what is here today is very interesting to me. This article shows how the Spaniards affected the Aztecs when they first explored the area, and finding anything from the Aztecs today is very difficult because Mexico City was built right on top of the Aztec civilization. The sacrifice that they found here gives great insight into the beliefs and values of the Aztecs and the more evidence they have and the more artifacts they have help them o create a clearer picture. However, it is very difficult to have large arcaeological digs because of the major city siting right on top of this evidence.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 11:58 AM

This should remind us all that we're quite literally built on the sacrifices of our ancestors, no pun intended. Many of the ancient cities of the world lay right under the surface of their modern counterparts, and the secrets yet discovered which they contain is enough to spend lifetimes studying!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 10:42 AM

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 4:09 PM

It is not uncommon to find bones underneath rubble and construction sites. To find this amount of ancient bones and bodies underneath that whole place is quite absurd. Now that this has been exposed and people are aware of it, government has cleared the block and revealed the temple.

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Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests

Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests | Seeing the World More Clearly | Scoop.it
The proposed construction of an Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York caused outrage when it was announced two years ago. Now days after the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the facility opened last night to no opposition.

 

This is an intriguing swing based on the initial reaction a few years ago about this Islamic cultural center.  Why the fervor 2 years ago?  Why the silence now?  These are worthwhile questions to explore with our students. 


Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's insight:

I wrote an essay two years ago, before Park51 opened, about the controversy surrounding it. Later, when I heard that it had finally opened, I was relieved. There were so many problems that the Islamic center faced because there was a lot of tension due to the center's proximity to Ground Zero. The Muslims need a place like this, especially close to Ground Zero to portray how it was terrorist groups that committed the terrible crimes and attacked the country and not the Islamic religion. In recent history, the US has had many problems with many Middle Eastern countries based on differences in beliefs, and the acceptance and tolerance of this cultural center portray how people can overcome these differences and not profile people based on religion, race, and ethnicity.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:47 PM

In my opinion trying to stop the building of this was awful. American prides itself on being the land of the free and that includes freedom of religion regardless of what the horror that took place on 9/11. What was done on 9/11 can not be blamed on a whole population, race, or religion when it was the doing of one group. The rest of these innocent people who were are part of the United States of America were just as affected as the rest of us and it is good to see that this building was allowed to happen in peace.