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SEEd Medical Publishers provides effective support to physicians and other health care professionals as well as for patients
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Intensive Care in Neurology and Neurosurgery: Daniel Agustín Godoy

Ebook
Intensive Care in Neurology and Neurosurgery (Daniel Agustín Godoy)

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This volume presents the work of a group of international experts in neurocritical care. This book provides the physician with a quick and practical tool for consultation and it’s dedicated to brain-injured and neurocritically ill patients and provides the physician with a quick and practical tool for consultation. The management of these patients constitutes a growing subspecialty that remains unrecognized by many international medical associations but has played a prominent role in intensive care over the last two decades. Neurocritical care as a subspecialty evolved from the need to provide highly specialized care to neurosurgical patients. Later, patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), hemorrhagic stroke, and acute central nervous system disorders were included in this line of care. Each of these patients requires specialists who are knowledgeable of their particular clinical situations in addition to rapid and often complex management of intracranial hypertension, technical equipment, and skilled nurses.
This book arrives in an era of electronic information sharing, and in the field of neuroscience, one of the fastest moving. If completeness was the aim, the book will look as a library, and would become outdated tomorrow. But the aim is to be of practical use, and to assist the clinical practice of the busy physician. Then clarity and synthesis have been the priority, rather than academic perfection. The intelligent reader will find what is necessary for starting, rather than finishing, his approach to neurointensive care. If this book will reinforce interest and curiosity, suggesting further reading and research, it will have accomplished a valuable goal.

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Reviews in Health Care

Reviews in Health Care | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

Reviews in Health Care: reviews in all the fields of medicine"

 

Reviews in Health Care publishes systematic and narrative reviews in all the fields of medicine and is published quarterly by SEEd Medical Publishers (print ISSN = 2038-6699; online ISSN = 2038-6702)

Reviews in Health Care is an open access journal. The aim is to provide clinical content of the highest quality, authority and accessibility.

It considers any original review (both systematic and narrative) from clinical to economical subjects. We are primarily interested in reviews concerning drugs, devices and diseases, but submission of reviews about surgical procedures or laboratory or epidemiological methodologies and techniques is of great interest to the journal.

Content is subject to peer-review and is editorially independent. Authors are asked to state any professional and financial situations that might be perceived as causing a conflict of interest with respect to integrity of content.

 

Reviews in Health Care considers any original review (both systematic and narrative) from clinical to economical subjects. We are primarily interested in reviews concerning drugs, devices and diseases, but submission of reviews about surgical procedures or laboratory or epidemiological methodologies and techniques is of great interest to the journal.

Content is subject to peer-review and is editorially independent.

Authors should consult the Instructions for authors for advice on manuscript preparation and submission.

We look forward to receiving your manuscripts.

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Health Situation in The Americas: Basic Health Indicators 2012

Health Situation in The Americas: Basic Health Indicators 2012 | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

The publication “Health Situation in the Americas. Basic Indicators 2012” of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) presents the latest available information on health indicators for countries and territories in the Region of the Americas..


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Power of telemedicine and the patient’s health

With the ever-changing world of health and technology new terms are almost always being discussed from ehealth to mhealth and telemedicine. Often times the patient might feel overwhelmed or confused...

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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3 reasons why patients should use social media

3 reasons why patients should use social media | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
There’s been a lot of talk over the last year or so about the benefits (and some drawbacks) of physicians using social media.

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No Sunshine On Continuing Medical Education?

No Sunshine On Continuing Medical Education? | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
SEEd Medical Publishing's insight:

CME providers will continue to depend on indusry funding and so choosing speakers who are seen favorably may remain a tempting practice. While this does not necessarily constitute a direct payment, some may continue to believe this sort of business arrangement is less than arm’s length. But what do you think?

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How Social media has transformed the way we think about disease, its treatment, and the connection between those who develop treatments and those who are treated

How Social media has transformed the way we think about disease, its treatment, and the connection between those who develop treatments and those who are treated | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

Tasteless comments about the growth of social communication often fall back on the hackneyed metaphor of "spreading like a cancer." The growth is uncontrolled, we are told, metastasizing in unexpected locations with ruthless speed. The body politic, we are told, is being rotted within by mutation. The traditions of the past are under siege, and we require radical surgery for a cure.

The panic is unwarranted, but the metaphor may be more apropos than we realize.

The astonishing (and Pulitzer Prize–winning) The Emperor of All Maladies describes the halting progress made in the fight against cancer since it was first identified by the Egyptian physician Imhotep 4500 years ago. For most of that grim history, cancer has been misunderstood, misidentified, and a hopeless diagnosis for its victims. Research was driven by a small number of obsessed, charismatic individuals, many of whom were unaware of related analyses being performed by doctors elsewhere—people didn't know things, and when they did it was not disseminated quickly or effectively. Social and intellectual stigmas slowed research. Nearly every advance in the treatment of cancer, from radiation therapy to chemotherapy and beyond, has come about within the lifetime of my grandparents.

And speaking of my grandparents, my grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer in the late 1960s, but passed away in 1997—30 years later. She was part of the first generation of cancer patients who expected to survive. Yet she and her contemporaries whispered the word "cancer" as though to speak its name would give it a totemic power. Her battles were unmentioned, a private war fought behind closed doors, alone and largely silent.

Contrast that approach to the story of Xeni Jardin, one of the editors of Boing Boing, among the top sites on the Internet. She live-blogged her first mammogram, which returned a diagnosis of breast cancer. She has a Pinterest Page entitled "my life, now, with breast cancer" showing pictures of her medication, the ginger ale she uses to prevent chemo-induced nausea, and various inspirations for her feelings on a given day. And this open approach isn't limited to patients: Researchers now collaborate across electronic networks and borders, sharing information, ideas, and case studies. There is no isolation anymore in the fight against cancer. Even the best young adult novel of 2012, The Fault in Our Stars, was a dark romantic comedy about teenagers with cancer—the critical moment in the book comes when a group of teens get together to talk about their afflictions.

What do all of these stories have in common? They are all about cancer, but they are also about communication and the way that communication has transformed the way we think about disease, its treatment, and the connection between those who develop treatments and those who are treated. The story of cancer in many ways mirrors the story of the life sciences more generally, and how social interaction—and the legal implications for that social interaction—are shaping a different world.

Once upon a time, there were patients, and there were doctors. Patients were sick, doctors tried to repair them. For many centuries, that involved putting their humors back into balance through a variety of ineffective techniques that ranged from blood-letting to therapies best not mentioned before eating. Some doctors were also intellectuals, and engaged in some variety of research, or writing, or teaching. But there was no class of research institutions, and no infrastructure for solving problems. Information moved slowly, when it moved at all, and only a small number of people were sufficiently aware to do anything with that information even if they received it.

Today, there are patients, there are doctors, there are drug companies, there are university researchers, there are academic medical centers, there are government researchers, there are patient advocacy organizations, there are charitable foundations, there are social media platforms, there are large databases of clinical information, there are computer software modeling companies, there are regulators, there are investors, and so many other types of participants in the world of the life sciences that to name them all would be an exercise in futility. They all want information. They all want to know the latest facts. They all want everything to happen immediately, and they want to know about it as soon as it happens.

Yet the law is not about immediacy. The law is about considered approaches to a variety of competing interests. Despite many of our preconceptions about free speech, the law does not want us to know everything right away, or to have access to all treatments right away. Regulatory approvals, research, and intellectual property protection all come before treatment. This was fine in a world in which no one really knew what was going on—but with the growth of social media platforms and specialized advocacy groups, information is disseminated at the speed of light. Once on the market, drugs and medical devices are no longer quietly promoted to medical professionals, but are advertised to the public at large. More people think that they are the target audience, and are insulted when they are denied what they want.

What this means is that the law is often seen today as an obstacle to progress, rather than a facilitator. This does not mean, however, that the law can or should be ignored—quite to the contrary; the law and its application to the regulation of communication about the life sciences has never been more important, and regulators have never been more active. Rather, it is instead important for lawyers and marketers and researchers and businesses alike to recognize the meaning of this change, and to take that meaning into account in how they engage in their legal clearance, which is no longer taking place in a vacuum. Ironically, we are all under a microscope.

Every step of the process of researching, developing, clearing, marketing, and using any medication or device is now subject to a meta-conversation, a discussion about the wisdom of every path taken, of every decision made, by every participant in the chain. I have often spoken of the internet and social media as "the end of forgetting," as all things said online rapidly become your permanent record. This means that our words are promiscuous, merging with other communications from other sources, and swirling around platforms that we have never seen or engaged with. The brands we create develop lives beyond the basket of associations we assign to our products, and we must participate in the conversation or allow the discussion to turn against us.

So what does all of this really signify? Most discussions of the law by lawyers talk about specific changes in the law, and how they can be addressed by their clients. But for a lawyer who works in social media, that perspective is far too limited. The technology changes too quickly, and the culture shifts every day (to feel profoundly behind the curve, just ask a 13 year-old about the technology choices she makes, and why). Instead, clients and lawyers must focus on trying to become more aware of the context for these discussions, and the technological advances that give them momentum. A life sciences company that is not profoundly sensitive to the social media environment and to the legal implications of their participation (and the participation of their ultimate customers, whether doctors or patients) is not only potentially getting into trouble (the lawyer voice inside me is screaming "what about the adverse event reporting? What about the privacy considerations?"), but also missing out on incredible opportunities.

My grandmother didn't want to speak about her illness, even as she fought it successfully for decades. Today, everyone has a megaphone, and they want to talk. So don't pretend that the world is the same. Figure out how to join in the conversation.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Specific Questions relating to this article should be addressed directly to the author.


Via Chatu Jayadewa, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Zena Sfeir's curator insight, February 1, 2013 9:53 AM

 A  pharma company that is not profoundly sensitive to the social media environment is missing out on incredible opportunitie !

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Quantifying the digital health revolution

A presentation delivered by Stephen Davies at the Fitness Writers' Association in London, UK


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Camilo Erazo's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:35 AM

Doctors will have to deal with a minority of 'super-engaged' patients who attempt to control their bodies through data gathering, analysis and visualization. Are they ready for it?

rob halkes's comment, January 25, 2013 8:39 AM
Personal communication styles have always been around. My hypothesis is that the higher the impact of the health condition and the more vulnerable therapy compliance is (e.g. in (breast) cancer, HIV), the more motivation for patients to tend to issues in coping with their conditions. So, let's not desire to 'connect' all patients, but start to try and learn. Culture and styles of doing care is a learning process..;-)
Rowan Norrie's curator insight, February 16, 2013 5:52 AM

Now is the time of biology, technology and big data! Great overview to show how we are now able to measure billions of datapoints about ourselves, track, analyse and take action accordingly.

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Electronic Health Tracking Increasingly Common, Researchers Say

Electronic Health Tracking Increasingly Common, Researchers Say | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
More Americans are tracking their health using smartphone applications and other devices that collect personal data automatically.

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Alex Butler's curator insight, January 28, 2013 2:22 AM

Another perspective on the Pew survey

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Social media has already changed the healthcare landscape irrevocably

Social media has already changed the healthcare landscape irrevocably | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

As patients increasingly turn toward social media to access healthcare and self-diagnose, the patient-provider relationship is changing, the book argues. The first step in this change came when patients gained access to medical information online. Now they're adding the power of crowd sourcing, which means the healthcare industry isn't just seeing a more educated patient but also patients interpreting information and, essentially, becoming a member of their healthcare team.

 

"Patients are becoming our colleagues," said co-author of 'Social Media For Nurses' Ramona Nelson. "It's changing relationships and the kinds of questions and services a patient asks for."

 

With healthcare becoming increasingly virtual, said Wolf, it's becoming the provider's responsibility to direct patients to the best online resources.

Looking ahead, Wolf advises that nurses and practitioners need to incorporate social media into a strategic plan to determine how they're going to use different platforms and extend services through them. This plan, she said, should be created from a clinical perspective as well as an IT perspective, allowing for an interdisciplinary approach.

 

"Clinicians in services may not understand websites or synchronized information versus unsynchronized information," she said. "They need help to get them out there virtually."


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 27, 2013 9:18 AM

Surely socia media do have changed health care and patients' care for their proper health. But I guess, it is still at the outside realms of the interactive care process itself: not directly to the interaction and communication wtihtin the care process itself!

Indeed, for some, attitutes of patients (informed empowerment) have been developed. Attitudes of physicians and other caregivers might also have been influenced, for some. But how to use social media to reconstruct the very caring process itself so as to create a more open and direct shared decision making between patients and hs caregivers? Theres is a lot to be learned and reserached still.BUt as you can read in this blog, resp. book, you will see that we go onwards, not backwards, for sure. ;-)

 

Sven Awege's comment, January 31, 2013 5:13 AM
We're all patients or caregivers, and some of us are pushing very hard, asking for much better service and taking responsibility about our health. We will prevail!
rob halkes's comment, January 31, 2013 5:55 AM
Indeed Sven, that's my spirit! SO, let's make it happen! ;-)
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7 Consumer Online Trends that Impact Healthcare Marketing in 2013 | Patricia Redsicker

7 Consumer Online Trends that Impact Healthcare Marketing in 2013 | Patricia Redsicker | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
The trends & insights about people looking for healthcare information online are interesting and useful in providing important clues for your marketing strategy
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The power of patient-expert books

The power of patient-expert books | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

More and more books are being written by patients -- well-educated, informed patients who manage their illness successfully and have experience, practical knowledge and insights to share with other patients.

 

When it comes to illness-warranted behavior changes, as like seeks like, it's often easier to make changes learned from fellow patients with whom you share the experience of a disease. Like support groups and mentor programs, this is fertile soil for positive behavior change.

 

Patient-authors also narrate the experience of illness. That is why I hope health care professionals (HCPs) are also reading books written by patients.


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Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, January 8, 2013 12:37 PM

This is a very positive step in the right direction - am excited to see this Andrew 

John Worth's comment, January 11, 2013 11:32 AM
As more patients become activated and engage with their health they become experts. HCPs are going to need to keep up or their science will dilute quicker than you can say 'pass the scalpel'.
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Europe wants to smash 'barriers' to digital health

Europe wants to smash 'barriers' to digital health | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
As the rise in mobile, connected health management services creates an ehealth boom in the US, Europe launches a strategy to upgrade health systems it concedes are stuck in the 20th century.

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Doctors prescribing phone apps to manage health problems

Doctors prescribing phone apps to manage health problems | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
Doctors are beginning to prescribe smart-phone applications and medical devices they work with to help patients manage chronic illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes and asthma.

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The Wisdom of Patients: Health Care Meets Online Social Media - CHCF.org

The Wisdom of Patients: Health Care Meets Online Social Media - CHCF.org | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

Social media on the Internet are empowering, engaging, and educating health care consumers and providers. While consumers use social media — including social networks, personal blogging, wikis, video sharing, and other formats — for emotional support, they also heavily rely on them to manage health conditions.


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Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, March 4, 2013 12:23 AM

 

The Internet has evolved from the information-retrieval of "Web 1.0" to "Web 2.0," which allows people who are not necessarily technologically savvy to generate and share content. The collective wisdom harnessed by social media can yield insights well beyond the knowledge of any single patient or physician, writes report author Jane Sarasohn-Kahn. The outcome of this development is "Health 2.0" — a new movement that challenges the notion that health care happens only between a single patient and doctor in an exam room.

 

Using examples, this report describes how the web is becoming a platform for convening people with shared concerns and creating health information that is more relevant to consumers. Social networks, ranging from Facebook to specific disease-oriented sites, are proliferating so rapidly that new services are already under development to help health consumers navigate through the networks.

 

The report details how innovative collaborations online are changing the way patients, providers, and researchers learn about therapeutic regimens and disease management. It examines the benefits and concerns regarding Health 2.0 and includes an extensive listing of health media resources. According to the report, the growing demand for transparency will drive the evolution of social media in health. A growing array of tools will become available that are increasingly mobile, as well as personal health data storage in commercial products like Microsoft Health Vault, Google Health, and others. The author concludes that the ongoing demands of a consumer-driven health marketplace will inspire innovation in applications that integrate clinical, financial, and ratings information.

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PatientsLikeMe's $1.9M award to create world’s first open research platform to develop patient-centered health outcome measurements

PatientsLikeMe's $1.9M award to create world’s first open research platform to develop patient-centered health outcome measurements | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

PatientsLikeMe has been awarded a $1.9 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to create the world's first open-participation research platform for the development of patient-centered health outcome measures.

 

The platform is part of a new open-science initiative that puts patients at the center of clinical research process and will allow researchers to pilot, deploy, share, and validate new ways to measure diseases. An “idea worth spreading,” the initiative will be spotlighted today in a presentation at TED2013 by Paul Wicks, Ph.D., PatientsLikeMe’s Research Director and a new TED Fellow.


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Denise Silber's curator insight, February 26, 2013 6:28 PM

add your insight...

 
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Using Twitter to connect with patients

Using Twitter to connect with patients | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
People are inherently social - in all walks and aspects of our lives.  This includes patients and patient advocates and their participation in healthcare.  Individuals, whether they meet at a confe...

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mHealth, pieza clave en el cambio del sistema sanitario | A un Clic de las TIC

mHealth, pieza clave en el cambio del sistema sanitario | A un Clic de las TIC | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
El término mHealth es muy amplio, englobando desde servicios de información al paciente, monitorización remota o recordatorios de citas o medicamentos mediante el canal móvil.

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Patient Engagement

Patient Engagement | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
A new AHA report argues that better engaging patients, families and communities has the potential to be a
SEEd Medical Publishing's insight:

Think about the last time you made a major purchase — a new computer, a smartphone, a car. If you are anything like me, you researched (over researched, my wife would say) the product. You checked out reviews at Consumer Reports, CNet or Car & Driver. You posted questions on Facebook. You spent hours grilling friends and family about their new toys. You went to 10 different stores to kick the tires to make sure it was the right fit for your needs and your budget. It's all a part of doing your due diligence, right?

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Generic and biosimilar medicines

Generic and biosimilar medicines | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
SEEd Medical Publishing's insight:

Once intellectual property protection, data and marketing exclusivity of reference medicines have expired, generic medicines and biosimilar medicines can enter the off-patent market.

Given that there tends to be confusion surrounding generic and biosimilar medicines, this Supplement describes some important aspects of these medicines. Simoens' Editorial introduces basic concepts related to generic and biosimilar medicines. Vogler et al. calculated the difference in ex-factory prices between five generic and reference medicines for 16 European countries, Godman et al. explored the contribution that low-priced generic medicines can make to enhance prescribing efficiency and support comprehensive and equitable health care, and Barei et al. showed that the switch from generic to biosimilar medicines appears to be driven by the lack of innovation in product portfolios, price pressure, competition and industrial evolution. At the same time, the development of biosimilar medicines is a source of innovation in itself as it requires the application of new technical, scientific, economic and commercial competencies. In this way, biosimilar medicines can provide a significant societal contribution by means of cost reduction and improved access to high-quality, innovative pharmacotherapy.

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Social and mobile continue to converge in healthcare

Social and mobile continue to converge in healthcare | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
I’ve been somewhat off the grid for yet another family health crisis lately, but I thought I’d at least surface to update this blog with something quick and easy. Healthcare Web and sof...

Via JP DOUMENG, Chanfimao, Giuseppe Fattori
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Pascal GIGOT's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:00 AM

La convergence des réseaux sociaux et des mobiles dans le domaine de la santé, une nouvelle décade!

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Forget the Placebo Effect: It's the 'Care Effect' That Matters | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Forget the Placebo Effect: It's the 'Care Effect' That Matters | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

Nathanael Johnson explores the “care effect” — the idea that the opportunity for patients to feel heard and cared for can improve their health.


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Doctor-patient interactions about hepatitis C

Doctor-patient interactions about hepatitis C | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it

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New York eHealth Collaborative Launches Patient Portal Design Challenge

New York eHealth Collaborative Launches Patient Portal Design Challenge | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
In partnership with Health 2.0 we’ve launched the Patient Portal for New Yorkers Design Challenge, which invites designers and developers to submit prototypes for a secure portal that will present patients with their individual PHR while educating...

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rob halkes's curator insight, January 16, 2013 7:31 AM

Interesting to see that there is again a challenge to start all over again to develop, whereas there is already so much?

Anyway a good initiative. Why don't you have a look at www.drimpy.com for example.;-)

Michael Seres's comment, January 16, 2013 12:59 PM
reinventing the wheel or looking for better versions?
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La salute degli Italiani nel 2011

La salute degli Italiani nel 2011 | SEEdMedicalPublishers | Scoop.it
Relazione sullo Stato Sanitario del Paese - RSSP 2011
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Roberto Insolia's curator insight, December 17, 2012 1:46 AM
Come ogni anno, il Ministro della Salute ha presentato la Relazione sullo Stato Sanitario nazionale: il documento fa il punto sullo stato di salute della popolazione e sull’andamento delle politiche sanitarie nel nostro Paese.Le malattie dell'apparato circolatorio si confermano essere la prima causa di morte (38,2% dei decessi totali), seguite dai tumori (29,7%). In particolare tra le donne, le malattie cardiovascolari sono la principale causa di morte (42,1%), mentre i tumori rappresentano la seconda causa (25,2%); situazione opposta nel sesso maschile, dove la prima causa di morte è rappresentata dai tumori (34,4%), seguita dalle malattie cardiovascolari (34,1%).Si registra un costante aumento nell'incidenza del diabete, tanto che in Italia si contano ormai tre milioni di malati - il 4,9% della popolazione.Cala il consumo di sigarette, probabilmente legato anche alla situazione economica generale, ma aumenta soprattutto fra i giovani l'uso del tabacco sfuso, per prepararsi sigarette a costi decisamente inferiori; tanto che il 46% dei ragazzi tra i 13 e i 15 anni di età dichiara di avere fumato almeno una volta nella vita. Per la La Salute degli Italiani 2010 http://goo.gl/Q64pR