Secondary English Education
13 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Spoken-Word Poets Bring Words to Life for Students

Spoken-Word Poets Bring Words to Life for Students | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it

By Alyssa Morones

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Greeks recited epic poems aloud. Actors have breathed life into Shakespeare’s soliloquies since the 16th century. Now, a pair of poet-educators are working to bring the rich art of spoken-word poetry to students from kindergarten to graduate school.

“The powerful and important thing about spoken word is, it doesn’t matter what the words look like on paper,” said Sarah Kay, a poet and the founder of a nonprofit organization that brings spoken-word poetry to schools. “It’s about what it sounds like when you say it out loud.”

While poetry long has been a staple of K-12 English classes, spoken-word poetry, an art form that extends from the beat poetry of the 1950s to contemporary rap, is less commonly taught. ButMs. Kay and other educators who have worked with her organization believe that kind of poetry may be especially well-suited to connecting with young people at an emotional level, making traditional poetry more accessible to students, and sharpening their critical-thinking skills.

“It inspires them to actually start putting pen to paper. If their curriculum is not inspiring them, something like this can,” said Ruben Zamora, a Sunnyvale, Calif., school librarian and poetry adviser who invited Ms. Kay’s organization, Project VOICE, for Vocal Outreach Into Creative Expression, to perform at his school.

Ms. Kay conceived the idea for the project in 2004 as a way to share the art of spoken-word poetry with students in her high school, the United Nations International School in New York, and revived it in 2007 with the help of her friend Phil Kaye, a fellow spoken-word poet, while both were at Brown University. Together, the young poets expanded the program to tour schools across the country and around the world, including the United Kingdom, Singapore, and South Africa.

Their mission? To entertain, educate, and inspire.

Creative Process

They begin each of their school visits with a show, introducing students to their art form with an original spoken-word performance.

SEE ALSOWatch spoken-word performances from Sarah Kay, Phil Kaye and others.

“A lot of students have never seen spoken-word performed,” said Ms. Kay. “What we try to do with each performance is show them how many different options of the art form there are.”

Then, in workshops of about 25 students each, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye try to build on the school’s existing curricula and help students create and perform their own spoken-word poems.

One of the first two schools where they performed was Mr. Zamora’s. They visited Fremont High School, in Sunnyvale, in 2009 at his request.

“Through the workshop process, students write and create ideas,” he said. “They form a poem and then share it and they produce some really good stuff.”

Project VOICE returned to Fremont in 2010, 2011, and 2012, and the school is hoping to bring the poets back next school year.

Fremont senior Sioeli Kaho was a freshman when he first saw a voice performance at his school.

“I remember walking into the room kind of skeptical, thinking how I’m not a big poetry guy,” said Mr. Kaho. “But, watching them, I was like, wow, this is actually really interesting.”

He’s been a member of Fremont’s spoken-word club ever since.

According to Mr. Zamora, attendance at the open-microphone events held by Fremont’s spoken-word club has more than doubled since the voice workshops.

“Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye catapulted that whole culture on our campus,” Mr. Zamora said.

He noted that a handful of teachers at Fremont now incorporate spoken-word in their classrooms, giving students several creative options in place of a standard report. Those include multimedia reports and essays, songs, or spoken-word poems.

“These options all still meet the teacher’s rubric and criteria, but now students have the freedom to be more creative,” said Mr. Zamora.

Tool for Common Core

Project VOICE’s approach to poetry may be timely as schools in most states move to teach the Common Core State Standards and in keeping with the new standards’ focus on text complexity, said Eileen Murphy, a member of the National Council of Teachers of English.

Spoken-word poets Phil Kaye and Sarah Kay, above, co-direct Project VOICE, an organization that brings spoken-word poetry workshops and performances to schools across the United States and around the world. The art form encompasses verses that were created to be recited out loud, such as beat poetry, rather than read on paper.—Melanie Burford/Prime for Education Week

“Poetry is in a unique position to offer teachers a complex, and many times brief, text when time is a sparse resource,” said Ms. Murphy, the founder and CEO of ThinkCERCA, which stands for Claim, Evidence, Reason, Counterargument, and Audience, located in Chicago, which aims to help teachers encourage critical thinking in their students.

The emphasis on having students create their own works in teaching spoken-word poetry adds a deeper educational dimension to the lessons, according to James Catterall, a professor emeritus at the graduate school of education and information studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, who specializes in arts and human development. “Teaching poetry and teaching art are different things,” he said. Teaching poetry is “the teacher pouring content into the kids. [Creating spoken-word] is more than just memorizing or understanding. It’s asking kids to think critically.”

While there hasn’t been much research on the learning benefits of teaching spoken-word poetry, Mr. Catterall said, “working out expressions in an art form is bound to boost cognitive development and [students’] ways of thinking and their approach to problems.”

Engaging Students

Another spoken-word educator is Peter Kahn, who taught it for nine years at Oak Park/River Forest High School in Oak Park, Ill. He recently left to launch a spoken-word education training program for teachers at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

He said the medium can have a transformative effect on students.

“It improves students as readers and writers, their critical thinking and analysis, their self-confidence, their literacy skills,” he said.

In his years as a spoken-word educator, Mr. Kahn found that students who were otherwise disengaged because of problems outside the classroom benefited the most.

“If you’re scared, you can’t take in new information,” he said. “Spoken-word allows kids to get those problems down on the page, to share them verbally, and to get rid of that background noise.”

Fremont student Sioeli Kaho concurred: “Spoken word gives me a way to act out and say how I feel and talk about anything that bothers me. It’s a way to let out a little steam.”

Diane Luby Lane, who started the Get Lit-Words Ignite spoken-word-poetry program in Los Angeles, found the same to be true. Many of the students she works with are at risk of dropping out of school or, if not, are still dealing with major problems in their lives.

“They’re supported in turning their stories into art. It affects their whole relationship with school and learning.

Because students typically get little exposure to spoken-word poetry, Ms. Kay said she and her colleagues have found that students are often “hungry for it” once they get a taste. “We know not every school has the means to have a big arts program, but that shouldn’t stop students from having access. That’s one of the things we’re working on.”

Project VOICE is funded through grants and from the fees charged to schools for each visit. The charges are determined by how much time the poets spend at the school. Mr. Kaye and Ms. Kay hope to raise enough money during the coming year to subsidize schools that wouldn’t otherwise be able to fit the program into their budgets.

Before the teaching artists leave a school, Project VOICE helps them continue to boost the spoken-word presence on their campuses. That includes everything from providing them with information on resources in their area to helping set up spoken-word poetry clubs.

Expanding Horizons

Another way the art form is spreading is through technology. “Even 10 years ago, spoken-word was hard to find unless you lived in a city,” said Mr. Kaye.

Now, sites like YouTube give students the opportunity to see a variety of poets and performances from all over the world. Several YouTube channels are dedicated solely to spoken-word, including Speakeasynyc, which features performances from poets across the nation.

In an effort to expand Project VOICE, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye recently hired a new poet to join their team and hope to gradually add more. In the meantime, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye are working on developing a text version of their curriculum, so that schools and teachers will have a solid foundation to build on after their visit.

Said Mr. Kaye: “We’re trying to create a structure that lets our visit be as long-lasting and impactful and meaningful as possible.”

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

A Compleat Book for the Teaching to Read Poetry | SRPR Blog

A Compleat Book for the Teaching to Read Poetry | SRPR Blog | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Of course, as many beliefs about why students should read poetry exist as there are teachers in the world. And, were I another kind of scholar, I would spend these next few pieces drawing out the various reasons I have heard ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from Reading and Writing in primary school
Scoop.it!

Literacy Teaching Ideas - Writing Poetry

Literacy Teaching Ideas - Writing Poetry | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Find free poetry writing teaching ideas, activities and resources for your primary and secondary classroom.

Via Fiona Beal
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

On Teaching Poetry in Chicago Public Schools - Stephanie Lane Sutton

Stephanie Lane Sutton performing at the Women of the World Poetry Slam in Minneapolis, MN. March 2013. Video by Amelia M. Garcia.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from Edgalaxy - Cool stuff for nerdy teachers
Scoop.it!

Teaching Poetry: Rhythm, Rhyme & Alliteration

Teaching Poetry: Rhythm, Rhyme & Alliteration | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
I came across this great lesson plan about teaching rhythm, rhyme and alteration in poetry. It does a great job at pointing out the process of creating rhyming patterns and sounds through common poems we all know.

Via Kevin Cummins
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from TeachingEnglish
Scoop.it!

10 Ways To Use Poetry for English Language Teaching Online

10 Ways To Use Poetry for English Language Teaching Online | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Today I will share some experiences, resources, and ideas about teaching with poetry. I see poetry in everything, but this is not just a fanciful mindset.

Via TeachingEnglish
more...
Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, May 13, 2013 6:09 PM
Thank you,great ideas
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is ...

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is ... | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Survey findings are complemented by insights from a series of online and in-person focus groups with middle and high school teachers and students in grades 9-12, conducted between November, 2011 and February, 2012.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

The best English 70. Teaching English Grammar.

Understand English step(by)step http://bit.ly/189sadt Much faster http://serlymar.blogspot.ru/ The best way to learn English The best english movie 71 http:/...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

English Grammar - Past Continuous - Teaching Ideas 2 - TEFL

http://www.teflonline.net For this TEFL teaching idea we ask the students to look at a scene in a hospital where there are several people doing different thi...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Planning for High School Students

Hi everyone! Here is the project that I have been working on for the past 10 months! I wrote a book called: Planning and Decision Making for High School Stud...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Teach grammar through writing — Joanne Jacobs

Teach grammar through writing — Joanne Jacobs | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
For example, one well-regarded study followed three groups of students from 9th to 11th grade where one group had traditional rule-bound lessons, a second received an alternative approach to grammar instruction, and a ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Teacher Education Resume - Professional Teaching Resume Writing Service by certified education resume writers

Teacher Education Resume - Professional Teaching Resume Writing Service by certified education resume writers | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Teacher Resume Writing - professional resumes for teachers by education resume writers (Teaching #Resume #Writing 100% #Guaranteed on 3/6 - #careerbarn http://t.co/F0KsxijEQH)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Learning Alongside his Students - willamette.edu

Learning Alongside his Students - willamette.edu | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Learning Alongside his Students
willamette.edu
“I don't think I would have started writing nonfiction if I wasn't teaching it,” says Nadelson, who's taught at Willamette for 10 years.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

iPaddiction: Explain Everything For Magnetic Poetry In High School English

iPaddiction: Explain Everything For Magnetic Poetry In High School English | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Explain Everything For Magnetic Poetry In High School English http://t.co/iA5lgzFdk9
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from Common Core Meiller
Scoop.it!

Teaching Kids Poetry

Teaching Kids Poetry | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Learn how teaching kids poetry teaches language fun, grammar, and positive life values. See the free lesson plans!

Via Brook Grove Meiller
more...
Brook Grove Meiller's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:24 PM

Explore this site for great grammar ideas.

Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

The Very Busy Classroom: Teaching Nouns and Verbs with Poetry

The Very Busy Classroom: Teaching Nouns and Verbs with Poetry | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Teaching Nouns and Verbs with Poetry. This week my first graders are learning about nouns and verbs. I found this poem Jump or Jiggle in my files from years ago. I typed it up and added some new fancy graphics and fonts.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from Literacy, Education and Common Core Standards in School and at Home
Scoop.it!

RUST: TEACHING POETRY, PHOTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHIC NOVELS TO MEET COMMON CORE STATE STANDARD

RUST: TEACHING POETRY, PHOTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHIC NOVELS TO MEET COMMON CORE STATE STANDARD | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it

RUST: TEACHING POETRY, PHOTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHIC NOVELS TO MEET COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS

 

This post has a review of Rust by Royden Lepp - a graphic novel that have been rated appropriate reading for all ages - although I would say they will be enjoyed by readers Grade 4 through adult. While younger readers will easily focus on Roman and Oswald his younger brother along with their responsibilities to their farm and family, and their relationship with Jet Jones,  older readers will comprehend the larger issues of artificial intelligence, and drone warfare.


Via Meryl Jaffe, PhD
more...
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, May 14, 2013 8:38 AM
Thank you Charles for the visit and rescoop.
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, June 10, 2013 4:57 PM
Thank you, Anita, for the visit and rescoop.
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, July 5, 2013 10:48 AM
Thank you Aulde for the visit and rescoop
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Teachers TV: Poetry in Motion

Crown Copyright. Provided by The Academic Grid http://tag.ac/ Further resources available on http://tag.ac Licensed to The Academic Grid formerly The Artis...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from college and career ready
Scoop.it!

Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers

Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Professional development opportunity for high school English teachers

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Inductive Grammar - Teaching Grammar Inductively

A short video I have produced while giving a teaching trainner seminar to instructors at a school in Coronel Fabriciano/MG. The material used is the Touchsto...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

Tutoring & Mentoring Show Significant Results for High School ...

Tutoring & Mentoring Show Significant Results for High School ... | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Douglass Academy High School students in 9th-11th grade are participating in the BAM mentoring program. One particular game they play teaches communication and leadership. But, the students say it's taught them so ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hannah Smith from Edtech PK-12
Scoop.it!

6 must-have apps for high school students: Back to School

6 must-have apps for high school students: Back to School | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
Six applications for high school students.

Via Cindy Rudy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

AWP 2014: New Approach to Teaching Creative Writing to Senior ...

AWP 2014: New Approach to Teaching Creative Writing to Senior ... | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
A guest blog post by G. Elizabeth Kretchmer Panelists: David Robson, Nancy McCurry, Paul Pat, Lloyd Noonan As a teacher of therapeutic and wellness writing workshops, primarily in the cancer and domestic violence ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Smith
Scoop.it!

The Pedagogies of Reading and Not Reading

The Pedagogies of Reading and Not Reading | Secondary English Education | Scoop.it
“There is more than one way not to read, the most radical of which is not to open a book at all.” ~ Pierre Bayard, How to Talk About Books You Haven’t Read Not reading is serious scholarly business...
more...
No comment yet.