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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

Via Shona Whyte
Eion_D's insight:

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:46 AM

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

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Game-Based Storytelling

Game-Based Storytelling | Secondary English | Scoop.it
All games tell stories. Unlike other media (books, television, film), the interactivity puts the player in the role of protagonist. Writing games can be quite complex and involve more than characters
Eion_D's insight:

Alright, I want you to read an education blog, but bear with me. We've been looking at a range of resources and media that can allow us to view texts critically, providing us with experiences and context in which to apply our learning. What does this have to do with gaming? Nothing. And everything. You probably know this better than I do -- games are an amazing learning tool -- not just to teach you wind velocity or whatever -- they also incorporate everything from narrative, to genre, to persuasive arguments. Have a read of this article, let it roll over in your mind for a moment that maybe, just perhaps using some of the techniques mentioned could be a really interesting way for you to express your creative writing assessment piece. Or not. That's the benefit of creative media; it can take many shapes and forms. 

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Rescooped by Eion_D from 7-12 English and Technology
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Because You Asked: How Tech Can Transform English/Language Arts Class from Good to Great (EdSurge News)

Because You Asked: How Tech Can Transform English/Language Arts Class from Good to Great (EdSurge News) | Secondary English | Scoop.it
English/Language Arts teachers often ask me what technology can do for them. After all, eBooks
are revolutionizing both the weight of students’ backpacks and the
local bookstore’s bottom line. But the English classroom?

Via Jenni Borg
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Jenni Borg's comment, July 2, 2013 6:56 PM
This site is useful because it is engaging, it is up-to-date, and it offers examples.
Dennis Large's comment, July 8, 2013 6:00 PM
I had never seen this resource. I like the way it incorporated so many examples of how to bring in different Web 2.0 tools.
Rescooped by Eion_D from 7-12 English and Technology
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Lesson Plans - ReadWriteThink

Lesson Plans - ReadWriteThink | Secondary English | Scoop.it
ReadWriteThink has hundreds of standards-based lesson plans written and reviewed by educators using current research and the best instructional practices. Find the perfect one for your classroom.

Via Jenni Borg
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Jenni Borg's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:08 PM

A great academic source that is engaging and offers lessons and activities.

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Dreaming Methods

Dreaming Methods | Secondary English | Scoop.it

The Literary Platform is dedicated to showcasing projects experimenting with literature and technology. It brings together comment from industry figures and key thinkers, and encourages debate.


Via cynthia jabar
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Rescooped by Eion_D from Pobre Gutenberg
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Digital trends in Children’s Book Publishing

Digital trends in Children’s Book Publishing | Secondary English | Scoop.it
The Literary Platform is dedicated to showcasing projects experimenting with literature and technology. It brings together comment from industry figures and key thinkers, and encourages debate.

Via booqlab
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Rescooped by Eion_D from English Corner
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English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling

English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling | Secondary English | Scoop.it
What have been the hinge points in the evolution of Anglo-American literature? Here's a provisional, partisan list

Via O Segrel Do Penedo
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Peta-Dannielle Adda's curator insight, April 8, 12:31 AM

By drawing the students' attention to changing literature throughout time, they will look into how the first authors recorded works and how technology has changed how people produce, publish and distribute literary works now and in the future.

Rescooped by Eion_D from Learning technologies for EFL
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

Via Shona Whyte
Eion_D's insight:

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

more...
Shona Whyte's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:46 AM

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

Rescooped by Eion_D from 7-12 English and Technology
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Integrating Technology In The Classroom

Integrating Technology In The Classroom | Secondary English | Scoop.it
Teacher Professional Development - This Playlist offers an introduction to what integrating technology in the classroom means.

Via Jenni Borg
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Jenni Borg's curator insight, June 28, 2013 3:58 PM

A YouTube channel with videoes about technology. How novel! :)

Catherine Samson Tolnai's comment, July 1, 2013 7:33 PM
I can't wait to share this resource!!
Rescooped by Eion_D from Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
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Making waves with F:sh

Making waves with F:sh | Secondary English | Scoop.it
The Literary Platform is dedicated to showcasing projects experimenting with literature and technology. It brings together comment from industry figures and key thinkers, and encourages debate.

Via Carisa Kluver
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Rescooped by Eion_D from Teacher Librarians Rule
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Building a digital library

Building a digital library | Secondary English | Scoop.it
The Literary Platform is dedicated to showcasing projects experimenting with literature and technology. It brings together comment from industry figures and key thinkers, and encourages debate.

Via Anne McLean
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Pixels, Music and Projections: When Art and Technology Collide

Pixels, Music and Projections: When Art and Technology Collide | Secondary English | Scoop.it
All photos: Ariel Zambelich/Wired...(Pixels, Music and Projections: When Art and Technology Collide http://t.co/MCld9zgh...)...

Via F. Thunus
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Poetry series, teen program at the South Side Library - South Pittsburgh Reporter

Poetry series, teen program at the South Side Library
South Pittsburgh Reporter
All are welcome to enjoy an afternoon of poetry in the comfort of their neighborhood library.
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