SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
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The Menace of Multiculturalism

The Menace of Multiculturalism | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Background, history, and analysis. Exposes multiculturalism as costly, contradictory, dangerous, and divisive

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Robert Campbell sr.'s curator insight, March 21, 2014 5:41 PM

Australia = America...Multiculturalism is an unsound political theory, advocated by liberals, academics, media personnel, social theorists, government officials, and politicians. While it is supported by a majority of those people, it is actually opposed by the overall majority of Australians.

 

It is a deliberate policy to actively maintain, support and build(1) foreign cultures in Australia, to the direct detriment of the Australian identity, culture and way of life...Treason against the USA...

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Shakespeare's Invisible Hand in Economics - Big Think

Shakespeare's Invisible Hand in Economics - Big Think | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Metaphors can be our shortest stories: their compact explanations often shape our view of the truth. But like stories taken out of context, badly mixed metaphors from biology and physics mislead many economists.
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uJMGE0dcjr

Have you seen the workbook "Code Switching: Why It Matters and How to Respond"? It offers great tips for #EHS. Visit: http://t.co/uJMGE0dcjr
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What a Coca Cola Ad Taught Us About Language Policy in the U.S.

What a Coca Cola Ad Taught Us About Language Policy in the U.S. | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
For a country that considers itself the world's superpower, its citizens are shockingly deficient when it comes to having a knowledge of foreign languages....
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Speech Acts (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) - Linkis.com

Speech Acts (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) - Linkis.com | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
SEP: Speech Acts: [Revised entry by Mitchell Green on October 2, 2014.
Changes to: Main text, Bib... http://t.co/TgthFd5KdG #philosophy
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Call for papers: The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages

Call for papers: The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Call for papers: The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages

2 October 2014

Key InformationAbstracts should be a maximum 300 words for both papers and posters (in a Word file) and be sent to:langpolconf@ucl.ac.ukA short professional biography (maximum 150 words) should be sent in a separate Word file.Deadline for submission: 20 January 2015An email confirming your acceptance will be sent by 30 March 2015Overview

The significance of the title ‘The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages’ is twofold.

Firstly, it alludes to politics and foreign languages in education, and second, to the politics of teaching and learning languages. The first of these approaches focuses on political and historical developments that influence tendencies, and shape policy, in the area of foreign language learning and education.

The second approach centres on the ideologically-governed attitudes that underlie language professionals’, teachers’, and textbook writers’ decisions when choosing a particular variety of a language, a particular methodological approach and resources in their teaching, writing, and syllabus-design practice.

 

The conference intends to address the historical perspectives and current key narratives surrounding the teaching of languages, linguistics, and area studies. Its aim is to explore language education in the context of an ever changing and dynamic societal, political, and cultural landscape globally, and in the UK-context.

 

Papers will be 20 minutes in length with 10 minutes for questions. Posters will be showcased during the second day of the conference and presented (maximum 5 minutes) in one of UCL’s public areas.

The conference programme includes key-note addresses by Nicholar Ostler, Chairman of the Foundation for Endangered Languages; Anne Pauwels, Professor of Sociolinguistics, Dean of the Faculty of Language and Culture at the School of Oriental and African Studies; Nigel Vincent, FBA, Professor Emeritus of General and Romance Linguistics, University of Manchester.

Organising committeeJelena Čalić, UCL SSEESEszter Tarsoly, UCL SSEESUrszula Chowaniec, UCL SSEESRiitta-Liisa Valijärvi, UCL SSEES, Uppsala University

We are planning to publish selected papers in a Conference Proceedings volume.

Rationale and Suggested Themes

 

 

The first theme of the Conference – politics and language teaching – addresses the political and institutional factors that underpin the promotion, in education and beyond, of a certain language, languages, or a particular language variety in a community at various points in time. Papers are invited to explore these questions in three different contexts: at global (e.g. linguae francae and world languages), national (e.g. national curricula, planning, and foreign language education strategies), and local institutional (e.g. schools, universities) levels. The Conference will also explore how the increased interest in a particular language or language variety affects the teaching and learning of other languages, primarily, but not exclusively, through the history of teaching and learning less-widely used languages (e.g. the languages of Central and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, minority languages of Russia and South-East Asia, etc.) in the UK context.

The second theme of the Conference – the politics of teaching and learning languages – addresses the above themes in the context of language professionals’ primary concerns, which centre on language, method, and teaching technique. We welcome proposals with an approach that taps into a further dimension of the political: at the level of classroom practices and of the individual. In this regard, the Conference seeks to explore the role of teachers and students as cultural mediators between the source and the target language-and-culture. It will investigate the dilemmas that the individual (teacher, learner, textbook writer, etc.) faces as a result of the mismatches between political agendas and ideological commitments in the communities associated with the source and the target languages-and-culture.

Possible questions include, but are not limited to, the following:

Theme one: Global, National, Institutional Politics and Language TeachingCan the history of foreign language teaching be seen as a political debate?In what ways is gender discourse relevant to foreign language teaching?How does migration (e.g. the recent migration from Central and Eastern Europe to the UK) affect languages, speakers, and the contact between them? What are the possible responses in language education to migration in both the source and the target communities?Enhancing interest in particular languages as a quick response to crises (e.g. languages of Central and Eastern Europe in the UK during the cold war, Russian in Eastern Europe, Serbian and Croatian in the 1990s, Arabic in the 2000s, and now perhaps Ukrainian in the UK-context) – does it work?If ‘a language is a dialect with an army and a navy’ [a shprakh iz a dialekt mit an armey un flot; M. Weinreich] how, and to what extent, is language professionals’ work determined by linguistic constraints and choices (e.g. the grammatical and lexical apparatus of a language, the existence of a reified ‘standard’ variety, etc.), on the one hand, and, on the other, by national and political agendas?How and to what extent is the planned or unplanned spreading of languages – and educational organisations’ and educators’ interest in them – influenced by language-internal (e.g. typological features and relatedness to other languages) and language-external (e.g. military, political, administrative, power-related, etc.) factors historically and at present?Theme two: The Politics of Teaching and Learning LanguagesHow do linguistic purism and standardisation shape classroom practices in the foreign language classroom? Is language teaching and textbook writing an inherently purist and normative undertaking?What to do with contact varieties of languages which came about as a result of migration (e.g. Spanglish, Ponglish, franglais, Hunglish, Somali in Finland, etc.) in language education?Can the example of teaching and learning diaspora languages (e.g. Yiddish, Romani), minority languages (e.g. Sami in Finland, Sweden, and Norway, Udmurt in the Russian Federation, Hungarian in Romania, German in Belgium), pluricentric languages (e.g. German, Spanish, South-Slavic languages) influence the teaching of languages with strong normative tendencies?Language revitalisation and language activism through language education: a pitfall or a possibility?Language variety and the individual: how are speakers and learners affected by a lack of overlap between the linguistic and civic communities that they belong to (e.g. speakers of Romanian in Moldova, of Finnish in Sweden, of Hungarian in Slovakia, of Polish in the UK)? In what way does foreign language learning and competence influence the learners’ sense of belonging to one or a number of communities?Foreign language textbooks as representations of communities: what do textbooks reveal about the way in which national or other native-speaking communities would like others to see them? In this respect, what are the differences between ‘internal’ textbooks, written by native-speaking authors and published in the country of origin of the language, and ‘external’ ones, published abroad, often by non-native authors (e.g. Routldge’s Colloquial series)?Claims of ownership over language: native-speaking v. non-native teachers of language.
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 2, 2014 8:35 PM
Call for papers: The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages

2 October 2014

Key Information
  • Abstracts should be a maximum 300 words for both papers and posters (in a Word file) and be sent to:langpolconf@ucl.ac.uk
  • A short professional biography (maximum 150 words) should be sent in a separate Word file.
  • Deadline for submission: 20 January 2015
  • An email confirming your acceptance will be sent by 30 March 2015
Overview

The significance of the title ‘The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages’ is twofold.

Firstly, it alludes to politics and foreign languages in education, and second, to the politics of teaching and learning languages. The first of these approaches focuses on political and historical developments that influence tendencies, and shape policy, in the area of foreign language learning and education.

The second approach centres on the ideologically-governed attitudes that underlie language professionals’, teachers’, and textbook writers’ decisions when choosing a particular variety of a language, a particular methodological approach and resources in their teaching, writing, and syllabus-design practice.

The conference intends to address the historical perspectives and current key narratives surrounding the teaching of languages, linguistics, and area studies. Its aim is to explore language education in the context of an ever changing and dynamic societal, political, and cultural landscape globally, and in the UK-context.

Papers will be 20 minutes in length with 10 minutes for questions. Posters will be showcased during the second day of the conference and presented (maximum 5 minutes) in one of UCL’s public areas.

The conference programme includes key-note addresses by Nicholar Ostler, Chairman of the Foundation for Endangered Languages; Anne Pauwels, Professor of Sociolinguistics, Dean of the Faculty of Language and Culture at the School of Oriental and African Studies; Nigel Vincent, FBA, Professor Emeritus of General and Romance Linguistics, University of Manchester.

Organising committee
  • Jelena Čalić, UCL SSEES
  • Eszter Tarsoly, UCL SSEES
  • Urszula Chowaniec, UCL SSEES
  • Riitta-Liisa Valijärvi, UCL SSEES, Uppsala University

We are planning to publish selected papers in a Conference Proceedings volume.

Rationale and Suggested Themes

The first theme of the Conference – politics and language teaching – addresses the political and institutional factors that underpin the promotion, in education and beyond, of a certain language, languages, or a particular language variety in a community at various points in time. Papers are invited to explore these questions in three different contexts: at global (e.g. linguae francae and world languages), national (e.g. national curricula, planning, and foreign language education strategies), and local institutional (e.g. schools, universities) levels. The Conference will also explore how the increased interest in a particular language or language variety affects the teaching and learning of other languages, primarily, but not exclusively, through the history of teaching and learning less-widely used languages (e.g. the languages of Central and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, minority languages of Russia and South-East Asia, etc.) in the UK context.

The second theme of the Conference – the politics of teaching and learning languages – addresses the above themes in the context of language professionals’ primary concerns, which centre on language, method, and teaching technique. We welcome proposals with an approach that taps into a further dimension of the political: at the level of classroom practices and of the individual. In this regard, the Conference seeks to explore the role of teachers and students as cultural mediators between the source and the target language-and-culture. It will investigate the dilemmas that the individual (teacher, learner, textbook writer, etc.) faces as a result of the mismatches between political agendas and ideological commitments in the communities associated with the source and the target languages-and-culture.

Possible questions include, but are not limited to, the following:

Theme one: Global, National, Institutional Politics and Language Teaching
  • Can the history of foreign language teaching be seen as a political debate?
  • In what ways is gender discourse relevant to foreign language teaching?
  • How does migration (e.g. the recent migration from Central and Eastern Europe to the UK) affect languages, speakers, and the contact between them? What are the possible responses in language education to migration in both the source and the target communities?
  • Enhancing interest in particular languages as a quick response to crises (e.g. languages of Central and Eastern Europe in the UK during the cold war, Russian in Eastern Europe, Serbian and Croatian in the 1990s, Arabic in the 2000s, and now perhaps Ukrainian in the UK-context) – does it work?
  • If ‘a language is a dialect with an army and a navy’ [a shprakh iz a dialekt mit an armey un flot; M. Weinreich] how, and to what extent, is language professionals’ work determined by linguistic constraints and choices (e.g. the grammatical and lexical apparatus of a language, the existence of a reified ‘standard’ variety, etc.), on the one hand, and, on the other, by national and political agendas?
  • How and to what extent is the planned or unplanned spreading of languages – and educational organisations’ and educators’ interest in them – influenced by language-internal (e.g. typological features and relatedness to other languages) and language-external (e.g. military, political, administrative, power-related, etc.) factors historically and at present?
Theme two: The Politics of Teaching and Learning Languages
  • How do linguistic purism and standardisation shape classroom practices in the foreign language classroom? Is language teaching and textbook writing an inherently purist and normative undertaking?
  • What to do with contact varieties of languages which came about as a result of migration (e.g. Spanglish, Ponglish, franglais, Hunglish, Somali in Finland, etc.) in language education?
  • Can the example of teaching and learning diaspora languages (e.g. Yiddish, Romani), minority languages (e.g. Sami in Finland, Sweden, and Norway, Udmurt in the Russian Federation, Hungarian in Romania, German in Belgium), pluricentric languages (e.g. German, Spanish, South-Slavic languages) influence the teaching of languages with strong normative tendencies?
  • Language revitalisation and language activism through language education: a pitfall or a possibility?
  • Language variety and the individual: how are speakers and learners affected by a lack of overlap between the linguistic and civic communities that they belong to (e.g. speakers of Romanian in Moldova, of Finnish in Sweden, of Hungarian in Slovakia, of Polish in the UK)? In what way does foreign language learning and competence influence the learners’ sense of belonging to one or a number of communities?
  • Foreign language textbooks as representations of communities: what do textbooks reveal about the way in which national or other native-speaking communities would like others to see them? In this respect, what are the differences between ‘internal’ textbooks, written by native-speaking authors and published in the country of origin of the language, and ‘external’ ones, published abroad, often by non-native authors (e.g. Routldge’s Colloquial series)?
  • Claims of ownership over language: native-speaking v. non-native teachers of language.
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David Pawson: Proverbs Part 1 (Unlocking the Bible Series)

In Unlocking the Bible, Pawson presents a book by book study of the whole Bible . The book is based on Pawson's belief that the Bible should be studied, as i...
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La Biblia,Metáfora del conocimiento astrológico.

El mito y la leyenda de las religiones en relacion al conocimiento astrológico. La biblia,compilacion mitica de la astrologia La Religion,producto romano por...
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La Sabiduria y El Orgullo - La Metafora "Las Espigas" - Reflexiones de Superacion Personal

La Sabiduria y El Orgullo La Metafora Las Espigas http://superacionymotivacion.com/ Metafora para inspirar y reflexionar ************************************...
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tlangblog

tlangblog | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
"Translation and Translanguaging" (Can 'languages' be replaced with 'translanguaging' as we listen closely to how people speak?
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Communicating Gender

Communicating Gender | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Taking a cross-disciplinary approach, Suzanne Romaine's main concern is to show how language and discourse play key roles in understanding and communicating gender and culture.

Via Nicole Khan
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Self, Orwell and the English language - Spiked

Spiked
Self, Orwell and the English language
Spiked
In 1942, racism, the idea that peoples such as the Indians were incapable of self-rule, was the orthodoxy, just as multiculturalism and difference are today.
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Code-switching: Why it matters and how to repon...

Code-switching: Why it matters and how to repon... | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Code-switching: Why it matters and how to repond on Spanish in the United States curated by Yuly Asencion (RT @yya2: Code-switching: Why it matters and how to repond.
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The Passion Translation to Launch October 2014 - Christian Newswire

The Passion Translation to Launch October 2014
New Bible Translation Recovers "Lost Language" from Original Scripture so Readers Can Encounter the Heart of God in a New Way

"The Passion Translation is the most exciting thing to happen to Bible translations in my lifetime!" -- Pastor Bill Johnson, Redding, CA

"Biblical scholars in each new generation have the privileged responsibility to search the original manuscripts of God's inspired Word, capture the precious ancient wisdom, and insert it into the phrases and expressions of the language of the day under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Many saints and scribes have given their lives for this holy task, and Dr. Brian Simmons has done exactly that. My wife, Winnie, and I are celebrating The Passion Translation; it is a priceless treasure to the body of Christ." -- Georgian Banov, DDHon; President and Cofounder of Global Celebration; General
Director of the Bulgarian Bible Project

Contact: Jennifer Willingham, 615-358-8285

RACINE, Wis., Oct. 7, 2014 /Christian Newswire/ -- BroadStreet Publishing announces the launch of The Passion Translation beginning with the books of Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Songs, Luke & Acts, John, Letters from Heaven (Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and 1 & 2 Timothy), and Hebrews & James. Designed to shape the spirituality of a generation, every book of the Bible is translated into an understandable form that will express the depths of the original languages in a powerful new way, revealing the original emotion behind the text.

Developed by a team led by linguist, noted missionary, and author Brian Simmons, The Passion Translation recaptures some of the "lost language" missing from translations that have not fully captured the emotional meanings and implications of Scripture. The Passion Translation is unique for incorporating the ancient Aramaic scripture, the same language Jesus spoke and taught in. "Aramaic and Hebrew are related linguistically, and both are considered to be passionate and poetic. Greek speaks to the mind while Aramaic-Hebrew speaks powerfully to the heart," says Simmons. "By referencing the text written in the very language in which Jesus taught, and then overlaying that with the Greek, we are able to translate the root meanings of the Scriptures in a new, fresh way."

The Passion Translation aims to add a spiritual dynamic by delving into the Aramaic texts along with the customary Greek to provide contemporary readers with an understanding of the emotion and nuance found in the original writings. "Words are containers for truth," believes Simmons. "Every generation needs a relevant, accurate translation that speaks to them. Our approach to translating Scripture includes an emphasis on the original emotive intent of the text."

"God refuses to meet us only in an intellectual way," says Simmons. "God wants to meet us at heart-level. So, with this translation, we are aiming for the words to go heart-deep and allow people to encounter the heart of God."

"The Word has to come alive; this is how we spark in the reader the original meaning. We want English speakers to have the same response as the original hearer when they first heard."

Believing God longs to have His Word expressed in every language in a way that would unlock the "passion" of His heart, Simmons and the translation team have a goal to use this work to trigger an overwhelming response to the truth of the Bible unfiltered by religious jargon—unfolding the deep mysteries of the Scriptures in the language of the heart. While accurate to the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts, this translation is passionately powerful in a contemporary form.

Calling The Passion Translation a "language of love," Simmons points out that in past translations the emotion of a text was relegated to a "spiritual backseat" as was the miraculous and supernatural. By taking a fresh look at the Scripture with both a linguist's passion for correct translation as well as a pastor's love for the heart of God, The Passion Translation provides an altogether new experience in reading and understanding the Word.

Already, The Passion Translation has impacted over a hundred thousand lives through an initial version of a few books that were completed. Reaction to the project from retailers and consumers alike has been powerful. For more information, including people's experience with the translation, and a comparison of verses between The Passion Translation and other versions of the Bible, please visit www.thepassiontranslation.com.

The other books of the Bible are in the process of translation and will be released in stages between now and 2017. The entire Passion Translation will be completed by 2017.

Press inquiries can be directed to Jennifer Willingham at jennifer@iconmediagroup.com.

ABOUT BRIAN AND CANDICE SIMMONS:
Brian and Candice Simmons have been described as true pioneers in ministry. Their teaching has opened doors in many nations to the Gospel. For the last forty years, Brian has been a linguist, a pastor, a missionary, a speaker and now brings all those gifts together to lead the translation work for The Passion Translation.

Titles Available:
Psalms: Poetry on Fire – ISBN 978-1-4245-4936-8 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4974-0)

Proverbs: Wisdom from Above – ISBN 978-1-4245-4942-9 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4973-3)

Song of Songs: Divine Romance – ISBN 978-1-4245-4957-3 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4977-1)

Luke & Acts: To the Lovers of God – ISBN 978-1-4245-4959-7 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4966-5)

John: Eternal Love – ISBN 978-1-4245-4958-0 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4964-1)

Letters from Heaven: By the Apostle Paul – ISBN 978-1-4245-4947-4 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4965-8)

Hebrews & James: Faith Works – ISBN 978-1-4245-4960-3 (e-ISBN 978-1-4245-4963-4)

The Passion Translation: Set of 7 (includes all titles listed above) – ISBN 978-1-4245-4961-0

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What are the benefits of bilingualism?

What are the benefits of bilingualism? | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
It was a headline that immediately grabbed my attention: A Bilingual Brain is More Developed: Oui or No?. My interest went beyond my passion for everything language-related; as someone who’s biling...
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Speech Acts (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Speech Acts http://t.co/71vvKD28op via @instapaper
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Listen Now

Listen Now | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
The @carlosgalindo Show, pioneering code switching political talk (English/Spanish) to the masses. Listen 7-9 PM ET
http://t.co/V0iJBntjvO
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Logical Fallacies in Public Discourse and Law - Economic and Political Weekly

Logical Fallacies in Public Discourse and Law Economic and Political Weekly In the author's view, most informal fallacies that are recurrent in our discourse on women and gender are products of those prejudices that have a chance of shaping a...
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Introduction to the Metaphor in end-of-life care project by Elena Semino

An Introduction to the Metaphor in end-of-life care project by Professor Elena Semino, Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University.
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A Memorable Melody Through the Proverbs - Huffington Post

A Memorable Melody Through the Proverbs - Huffington Post | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
A Memorable Melody Through the Proverbs
Huffington Post
For the entire month of September, 100 percent of the profits from Sing the Bible sales will benefit Restore Academy in Gulu, Uganda.
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JOSE LUIS PIMENTEL- DIFERENCIA ENTRE METÁFORA Y SÍMIL (FIGURAS RETORICAS EN LA BIBLIA)

PARTE DE LA SESIÓN FIGURAS RETORICAS EN LA BIBLIA, MATERIA HERMENÉUTICA BÍBLICA; EN LA EXTENCION DEL SEMINARIO TEOLÓGICO MIZPA EN LA IGLESIA DE DIOS PENTECOSTAL M.I. DE LA 41 EN LOS MINA.
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The term taxpayer has eclipsed use of the word citizen in politics, media - Vancouver Sun

The term taxpayer has eclipsed use of the word citizen in politics, media - Vancouver Sun | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Vancouver Sun
The term taxpayer has eclipsed use of the word citizen in politics, media
Vancouver Sun
Re: We need citizens, not just taxpayers and bookkeepers, Column, Sept. 15.
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Academic Research vs. Political Propaganda: Lessons from the Fraser Institute’s Study of Minority-Language Education | Academic Matters

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@jrmcquarrie @mmletourneau Hello Matt. Did you see my article on the Fraser Institute study of official bilingualism?http://t.co/zSPQsAwyH6
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Political Correctness: A Social Cancer - San Angelo LIVE!

Political Correctness: A Social Cancer - San Angelo LIVE! | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Political Correctness: A Social Cancer
San Angelo LIVE!
We're consoled by the self-appointed speech monitors, that being politically correct is for the sake of civil discourse and to prevent the marginalization of the disadvantaged or oppressed.
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The Birth of a Language - Translation Blog

The Birth of a Language - Translation Blog | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Some time ago we wrote about code switching, and how this informal phenomenon manifests itself in virtually infinite ways. In that post, we mentioned Spanglish, Belgrano-Deutsch, Portuñol, and Llanito as examples of code switching.
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Damian Smyth on Twitter: "Prof Jeremy Smith hilariously illustrating linguistic 'code switching' in modern Scots literature @HurchinHome http://t.co/75YVXlHMZq"

Damian Smyth on Twitter: "Prof Jeremy Smith hilariously illustrating linguistic 'code switching' in modern Scots literature @HurchinHome http://t.co/75YVXlHMZq" | SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION | Scoop.it
Prof Jeremy Smith hilariously illustrating linguistic 'code switching' in modern Scots literature @HurchinHome http://t.co/75YVXlHMZq
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