SeamesAPHG
0 view | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anna Seames from Name News
Scoop.it!

NameFreak!: Place Names: 1912 vs. 2012

NameFreak!: Place Names: 1912 vs. 2012 | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"Parents have been using place names as their children's names a lot over the years. I compared the Top 1000 for 1912 with 2012 and there seems to be an increase in place names given after 100 years."


Via Clare
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP HumanGeo
Scoop.it!

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Despite the fact that Detroiters will get the benefits of newfound energy, enthusiasm, and even money, it's unrealistic to expect a group who is scared of the unknown and having power stripped away to welcome outsiders with open arms.

 

 BM: Detroit has been down in a slump for a while and with gentrification(adding people of wealthier income) into the the Midtown neighborhood of Detroit. Despite the wealth of income in Midtown the rest of the City still has an average income of around $28,000 which is pretty weak compared to Midtown's average income of $111,000. One could argue that this gentrification project is not going at the pace desired. Slow and steady...


Via Seth Dixon, Dawn Haas Tache
more...
Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP Human Geography Finnegan
Scoop.it!

Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped

Via Seth Dixon, Shan Finn
more...
Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:22 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the political outlook of Womens' rights across the world where the yellow is where women have the right to vote, grey is where women have the right to stand for election and black is where the first women were elected recently.

 

This map relates to unit 1 because it is an example of a reference map because of the data it shows and is a very precise version of a formal region because of its commonality between regions. It also shows a spread of hierarchical diffusion through wealthier countries

Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications Keller kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us

Via Allison Anthony, Courtney Barrowman, Jen Murray
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 10, 2014 3:14 PM

unit 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 24, 2015 12:06 PM

This powerpoint explains very well how central place theory works and a little about what it is. It really depend my understanding.

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

This Facebook Page Allows Iranian Women to Share Selfies Sans Hijab

This Facebook Page Allows Iranian Women to Share Selfies Sans Hijab | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"A Facebook page called Stealthy Freedoms of Iranian Women has garnered more than 200,000 likes since its creation at the beginning of this month. The idea behind it is simple: an anonymous platform for Iranian women to post photos of themselves without their head scarves.

As Mid East Faces reports, Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad, who moved to London in 2009, decided to create the page after receiving countless complaints from her female friends back home. They were jealous of her Facebook photos of "her hair blowing in the wind," Mid East Faces writes. 

Alinejad told the Guardian that she doesn't judge when it comes to whether or not a woman in Iran wants to wear a hijab."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 2014 10:52 AM

The hijab is an incredibly complex cultural artifact full of social meanings all over the political spectrum.  This poster shows some of the social pressures exerted on women in Iran to wear the hijab.  Many hijab-wearing women don't want other women to be shamed into conforming.  

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographic Perspective Matters in Policy Debates

Geographic Perspective Matters in Policy Debates | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"The American policymaking sphere has long been dominated by political scientists and economists. While I have nothing against these disciplines, and acknowledge that they have made important contributions to our public discourse, I am also concerned that we have not always heard the full range of perspectives on important questions of the day.  Geography has a different perspective to offer, and our public discourse is impoverished without it."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 2014 10:05 PM

Spatial thinking needs to be infused into many of our public conversations, and geographers collectively need to find ways to be a part of them.

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:05 PM

A great article discussing why geography matters in ongoing discussions about public policy. The spatial perspective is a key thing to remember in any decision-making process.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:59 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the Harm de Blij book "Why Geography Matters" that is assigned for summer reading because it indicates that geography's perspectives matter equally or more so than political science and economics.

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Modern Ruins
Scoop.it!

Urban Geography

Urban Geography | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
This page is a short guide to the fascinating field of Urban Geography.  It explains some of the ideas encompassed in the study of Urban Geography, as well as some of it's applications to your everyday life.

Via Laura Brown
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

APHG Reading Newsletters

APHG Reading Newsletters | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 31, 2014 4:20 PM

This week I am in Cincinnati, OH, scoring the AP Human Geography exams.  Here you can find the digital newsletters that are intended for the AP readers to know about the upcoming events.  I will post future newsletters here as well. 


I also am teaching in Elmhurst College’s Graduate Certificate Program in Human Geography for AP.  They have recently announced some changes that will make it much more accessible and applicable for teachers.  They have added a Master’s Program in Applied Geospatial Sciences with Concentration in Human Geography as well as a non-credit (read, cheaper) option for the courses in the program as well.  Look into it!

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP Human Geography at West High School
Scoop.it!

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP HumanGeo
Scoop.it!

How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


Via Seth Dixon, Dawn Haas Tache
more...
Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
Rescooped by Anna Seames from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Redistricting

How can cartography swing and election?  Simple.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Human Geography, Jen Murray
more...
Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
Rescooped by Anna Seames from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There.

Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There. | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Can you tell a person's politics based on where they buy their groceries or hamburger? Here's one gauge of how liberal or conservative customers are at America's chain restaurants, fast-food establishments and supermarkets.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2014 12:12 PM

Years ago before the whole "Marriage Equality vs. Chick-Fil-A" snafu, I was outside of Baltimore on a road trip.  As my family pulled of the interstate there were two options food options: Panera Bread and Chick-Fil-A.  My 3 kids couldn't care less about Foccacia, so I took them to Chick-Fil-A while me wife got something at Panera.  Although these establishment were adjacent to each other they occupied radically different social spaces and distinct ethnic networks and speculated that the political affiliations of customers would also be difference.  This observation is supported by the data in this article that shows that certain restaurants attract (cater to?) a clientele that is either more conservative or more liberal.    

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographic Calibrations

Geographic Calibrations | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the roles of distance and area in some activities, by no means has it eliminated the utility of these concepts."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 12:56 PM

We tend to forget how easy it is to compare the sizes and distances, especially when considering the move form 3D to 2D. Something to consider when reading and interpreting maps.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:35 PM

A central theme of geography is place and the spacial organization of it. The USA is an extremely large area and its citizens often don't recognize this fact. Manifest destiny was a concept that stated that it was an American's duty to expand into the frontier to further the dominion of the American government. This imperialistic tendency ended when the US reached the Atlantic Ocean, but the land conquered was vast. Many countries in the world can fit many times over into the continental United States, but the citizens of the states take this fact for granted. This article serves as a needed reminder of this fact, and helps people put America's spacial consumption into perspective. 

Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:50 PM

Really puts the size of countries into perspective... 

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:21 PM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:35 PM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

Rescooped by Anna Seames from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | SeamesAPHG | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:19 AM

Europe's landscape is still scared by World War I. Many photographs are shown in this article of abandoned battlefields that reveal the trenches scars. It has been at least a century since the Great War, yet the country is still buried with scars. In this image by Irish landscape photographer Michael St. Maur Sheil, you can trace grass-covered trenches and pockmarks from exploded bombshells. Millions of men were injured or even killed right in this very spot, which was the first major British offensive of the war. Artists take these photographs to document the legacy that was left on that battlefield. Sheil was very famous for photographs such as these. He includes seventy-nine contemporary photographs of World War I battlefields and has them on display in Paris along the wrought-iron fence of Luxembourg Gardens.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:57 PM

People often forget that the world doesn't reset after a major war. World War I was one of the most destructive wars in Europe's long history, not only in terms of human casualties, but also in terms of physical destruction. The heavy use of trench warfare left an everlasting mark on the landscape. Soldiers dug trenches that were miles long and use them for protection from enemy fire. Any observer can see that bullets do not turn corners and that a soldier can hide within the trench and be impervious to gunfire. There is one major weakness in this tactic that explains the dips in the landscape surrounding the trenches. In order to reach the enemy soldiers, bomb and mortar attacks were very effective. The everlasting geographical scaring of the land tells the history of what took place in an area, from wars in Europe to glacial movement in Alaska. The landscape never forgets.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 10:11 AM

This particular landscape shows trenches and the remains of bombed out fields where one million British soldiers where either killed or wounded by the Germans. I cannot fathom the heartache and loss that these families must have experienced and in some cases still are. How many future leaders or scientists or Nobel Peace Prize winners were killed here? How might the world be a better place but for the butchering of these soldiers? Multiply that though by the hundreds of wars fought throughout civilization. We could be so far advanced as a society, instead we chose and continue to choose wars that contain costs we can't even quantify. I'd like to see cancer cells being destroyed, not people, housing being built instead of propaganda, education instead of anarchy. No more scars, let's build beautiful monuments to society, like peace.