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Scribble and Scrub
Writing will never earn you a paycheck. Only rewriting can do that. Scribble all you want, just be sure and scrub up really well afterward.
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How to make your writing stronger by mixing ‘hard’ & ‘soft’ words | Poynter.

How to make your writing stronger by mixing ‘hard’ & ‘soft’ words | Poynter. | Scribble and Scrub | Scoop.it

Said aloud, longer words flow more quickly than short ones, just as “convertible” has more rhythm than the double pop sound of “rag top.”

 

The hard stock of English words comes from our Anglo-Saxon heritage. In addition to function words such as prepositions and conjunctions, the Old English word hoard contained many stark words of one syllable, including the notorious four-letter variety. That hard language was softened in 1066 after the invasion of England by William the Conqueror. The Norman (think French) king brought with him a language that sounded more sophisticated.

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How to Ask a Smart Question

How to Ask a Smart Question | Scribble and Scrub | Scoop.it

By S. Snyder

Via The Committed Sardine

 

"The title of this essay is "How to Ask a Smart Question" and I have tried to lay out some general guidelines and pitfalls to avoid when you pose questions to gain a greater understanding. I wish I could tell you that asking such questions comes easily; it doesn't. Rather, it's an intellectual habit or a disciplined way of thinking that you can only learn by doing. After all, an expert can give you pointers on shooting a free throw or hitting a golf ball, but you only get good at it with practice."


Via Jim Lerman
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Baltimore Sun columnist confesses to recycling passages from old columns | Poynter.

Is it still plagiarism when you plagiarize yourself? Craig Silverman reports, "The column bears the innocuous headline, 'Longtime columnist embarks on new writing path.' I personally think 'Longtime columnist self-plagiarizes, gets to keep writing' is catchier, and more accurate."

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Wylie's Writing Tips

Wylie's Writing Tips | Scribble and Scrub | Scoop.it

STORYtoolz’s facts & figures make copy more readable.

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Sense, Sensibility and Sentences: Examining and Writing Memorable Lines

Sense, Sensibility and Sentences: Examining and Writing Memorable Lines | Scribble and Scrub | Scoop.it
What can a single sentence accomplish? How do writers achieve different effects in sentences?
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A Propos Mike Daisey: Ode to Fact-Checking

A Propos Mike Daisey: Ode to Fact-Checking | Scribble and Scrub | Scoop.it

The first rule of fact-checking is that everything you read and hear is wrong. Were you to be hired as a fact-checker, as I was in 2007, at Mother Jones—or at the other remaining bastions of fact-checking, mostly a handful of magazines known for their reporting—you would be taught that information couldn't be trusted. It is, rather, presumed fallacious until proved otherwise.

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