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Oprah's Charity Work, Events and Causes

Oprah's Charity Work, Events and Causes | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it
Details of Oprah's support for charities including Clinton Foundation, Oprah's Angel Network, and Red Cross. We have 102 articles about Oprah's philanthropy.
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When it comes to being benevolent and giving to charity, one person comes to mind: Oprah Winfrey.

She has donated millions of dollars to various charities and organizations, with most of her money going to three foundations: The Angel Network, The Oprah Winfrey Foundation, and The Oprah Winfrey Operating Foundation.

Using her talk to show to publicize The Angel Network, Winfrey has said that 100% of any donation you give, goes directly towards funding a project. Some examples of the projects are The Oprah WinfreyLeadership Academy for Girls in South Africa and Rebuilding the Gulf Coast.

The Oprah Winfrey Foundation is run exclusively by Oprah Winfrey. (You can not donate to this organization, because it’s funded by an endowment.) The Oprah Winfrey Operating Foundation was initially created in 2007 to give money towards the Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. Through these organizations, Winfrey has truly established herself as an altruistic person. She has extended her arm and influence far and wide throughout the world.



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devin thomas's curator insight, January 17, 2013 9:03 AM

When it comes to being benevolent and giving to charity, one person comes to mind: Oprah Winfrey.

She has donated millions of dollars to various charities and organizations, with most of her money going to three foundations: The Angel Network, The Oprah Winfrey Foundation, and The Oprah Winfrey Operating Foundation.

Using her talk to show to publicize The Angel Network, Winfrey has said that 100% of any donation you give, goes directly towards funding a project. Some examples of the projects are The Oprah WinfreyLeadership Academy for Girls in South Africa and Rebuilding the Gulf Coast.

The Oprah Winfrey Foundation is run exclusively by Oprah Winfrey. (You can not donate to this organization, because it’s funded by an endowment.) The Oprah Winfrey Operating Foundation was initially created in 2007 to give money towards the Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. Through these organizations, Winfrey has truly established herself as an altruistic person. She has extended her arm and influence far and wide throughout the world.

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primary document #2

primary document #2 | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it
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it looks like that man is calling John Thomas Scopes out

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Website Today #2

Website Today #2 | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it
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Due to circumstances beyond our control, the 2012 Scopes Festival has been cancelled. This includes the play, special appearance by Norman Blake, and other activities on the courthouse lawn. We are beginning efforts to ensure the festival returns in 2013. We share the disappointment of many who had planned to attend the festival, and apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. Festival Events (free unless otherwise noted): CANCELLED
Antique Tractor ShowFestival events are designed to "Front Page News," presented in the courtroom where the trial was held (Tickets, $10) Live music on the courthouse lawnPeriod craft & artisan demonstrationsFood and craft vendor boothsVintage car cruise-in & antique tractor show (Saturday only)Charleston dance demonstration and lessons (Saturday only)'History Within Us' presentation (A children's view of Rhea County history)

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Scopes Trial #5

Scopes Trial #5 | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it

Eighty years ago, in July 1925, the mixture of religion, science and the public schools caught fire in Dayton, Tenn. The Scopes trial — or "Monkey Trial," as it was called — dominated headlines across the country. The trial lasted just a week, but the questions it raised are as divisive now as they were back then. NPR looks back at the Scopes trial, the events that led up to it and its aftermath

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historical website #3: the scopes trial

The Scopes trial came at a crossroads in history - as people were choosing to cling to the past or jump into the future. The trial itself was a series of conflicts, the obvious one being evolution vs. religion. But as John Crowe Ransom notes, there were a series of tensions throughout the trial, including questions of collective vs. individual rights and academic vs. parental concerns, which have persisted in American culture since the birth of the nation (8). At issue in both of these conflicts was who had control of the society. Who controlled the schools - the masses or the teachers? Who determined the law - the people or the leaders of the town? The resolution was even more unsettling because there was none. Scopes lost the case, but won the public's favor, and the Butler Law remained on the books in Tennessee.

For historical scholars, understanding the Scopes trial begins with a cultural framework. To Ransom, the trial was a product of "the modernist-fundamentalist conflict of the period." As R.M.Cornelius wrote in "Their Stage Drew All the World," "This controversy, whose stage was the battle over the nature of the bible, produced a whole cycle of dramatic confrontations, of which the Scopes trial was but one"(9).

The Scopes trial was not distinct, therefore, so much for its theme as it was for its was for its presentation. Other school districts and other towns, struggling with this very issue, missed the media circus. Dayton, however, came to center-stage, with the lawyers and business men writing the script and the country enthralled with this true American drama.

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Historical Website #1: The Scopes Trial

Historical Website #1: The Scopes Trial | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it

The debates over fundamentalism and modernism and over who controls the content taught in public schools continued throughout the rest of the 20th century. The trial, along with other cultural clashes in the 1920s, was a keen indication that Americans had begun in a more intense manner than ever before--even during the Revolutionary War period--to debate the basic values of their civilization. In large measure because of the cultural issues involved and the fact that the trial did not resolve them, some of the historical facts have given way to legend.

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primary document #1

primary document #1 | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it
devin thomas's insight:

there in the church talk about the trial.

 

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website #1 today

website #1 today | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it
DAYTON, Tenn. » It was yet another Trial of the Century — one of those noisy spectacles that roll around every decade or so — but this one wasn't about murder or celebrity ki
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 It was yet another Trial of the Century — one of those noisy spectacles that roll around every decade or so — but this one wasn't about murder or celebrity kidnapping.

Rather, it involved a new Tennessee law prohibiting the teaching of evolution in public schools and an unassuming high school science teacher, John Scopes, who went on trial in July 1925 in the hill town of eastern Tennessee for violating it.

It was quickly dubbed "The Monkey Trial," a description the town still dislikes, and for a couple of weeks the world was focused on conservative backwater Dayton, population about 3,000, which was flooded with some 200 journalists from around the world, scores of telegraph operators, thousands of onlookers and some of the finest legal talent in America. It was the first American trial to be broadcast live nationally on the radio.

 

SCOPES TRIAL MUSEUM AND RHEA COUNTY COURTHOUSEA festival includes re-enactments of the trial in the original courtroom.

 

» When: July 20-21

» Where: 1475 Market St., Dayton, Tenn.

» Website: www.rheacounty.com/attractions.html

» Phone: 423-775-7801

» Museum hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday

» Cost: Free

 

 

 

The trial was the inspiration for the play and 1960 Spencer Tracy movie "Inherit the Wind," widely seen as a jab at the McCarthy era of the 1950s much as was Arthur Miller's "The Crucible." It had four Oscar nominations.

The courtroom in the 1891 brick courthouse has been restored, and the basement is now a Scopes Trial museum, all free. Each July, the town holds a festival marking the anniversary of the trial; this year it's scheduled for July 20-21.

It remains a working courtroom, looking as it did when the high-profile protagonists, in shirtsleeves and suspenders rather than suit jackets (the judge's concession to the heat) slugged out the finer points of the Book of Genesis for nearly two weeks that hot July.

The museum, through photos and other artifacts, tries to re-create the feel of the town during Dayton's flash of fame. With a little imagination, it works.

 
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Primary Document #1

Primary Document #1 | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it

The story of the Scopes trial is retold in this Paramount and Pathe News film "Greatest Headlines of the Century," produced in 1960. In 1925, John Scopes was convicted and fined $100 for teaching evolution in his Dayton, Tenn., classroom. The first highly publicized trial concerning the teaching of evolution, the Scopes trial also represents a dramatic clash between traditional and modern values in America of the 1920s.

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Historical website #2: the Scopes Trial

Historical website #2: the Scopes Trial | scopes trial Devin's page | Scoop.it

As comical as this scene sounds, its background was anything but amusing. Sixty-six years after Charles Darwin published his controversial Origin of Species, the debate he'd engendered over humankind's evolution from primates had suddenly reached a fever pitch in this hamlet on the Tennessee River. Efforts to enforce a new state statute against the teaching of evolution in public schools had precipitated the arrest of Dayton educator John T. Scopes. His subsequent prosecution drew international press attention as well as the involvement of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). It also attracted two headliners of that era–Chicago criminal attorney Clarence Darrow and former presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan–to act as opposing counsel.

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