scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.."
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scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.."
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VW diesel emissions scandal: what you need to know in 10 questions (updated)

VW diesel emissions scandal: what you need to know in 10 questions (updated) | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

"Friday, March 18th, will mark six months since the news that Volkswagen deliberately circumvented U.S. EPA emissions laws on so-called "clean diesel" models sold from 2009 through 2015 ..."


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What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, technology, physical, geology.


Via Seth Dixon
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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 12, 2016 10:01 AM
Kind of like your own personal Google Earth.
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It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 2016 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

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Daylight Saving Time Explained


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2015 7:00 PM

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  Day Light Savings (whether you agree with it or not) has to do with fundamental Earth-Sun relationships and have some corresponding spatial patterns of who does or does not follow it.  The tag below links to my archive of his many geographically related videos.   


Tags: CGP Grey.

Charli Wiggill's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:45 AM

@Jackie Barnard - any use for your geographers?

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The ‘driest place on Earth’ is covered in pink flowers after a crazy year of rain

The ‘driest place on Earth’ is covered in pink flowers after a crazy year of rain | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
The Atacama desert is awash with color after extreme El Nino rains.

Via No Such Thing As The News
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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

Via Seth Dixon
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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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Simulating 1 second of human brain activity takes 82,944 processors

Simulating 1 second of human brain activity takes 82,944 processors | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

The brain is a deviously complex biological computing device that even the fastest supercomputers in the world fail to emulate. Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Technology Graduate University in Japan and Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany have managed to simulate a single second of human brain activity in a very, very powerful computer. This feat of computational might was made possible by the open source simulation software known as NEST. Of course, some serious computing power was needed as well. Luckily, the team had access to the fourth fastest supercomputer in the world — the K computer at the Riken research institute in Kobe, Japan.


Using the NEST software framework, the team led by Markus Diesmann and Abigail Morrison succeeded in creating an artificial neural network of 1.73 billion nerve cells connected by 10.4 trillion synapses. While impressive, this is only a fraction of the neurons every human brain contains. Scientists believe we all carry 80-100 billion nerve cells, or about as many stars as there are in the Milky Way.


Knowing this, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the researchers were not able to simulate the brain’s activity in real time. It took 40 minutes with the combined muscle of 82,944 processors in K computer to get just 1 second of biological brain processing time. While running, the simulation ate up about 1PB of system memory as each synapse was modeled individually.


Computing power will continue to ramp up while transistors scale down, which could make true neural simulations possible in real time with supercomputers. Eventually scientists without access to one of the speediest machines in the world will be able to use cluster computing to accomplish similar feats. Maybe one day a single home computer will be capable of the same thing.


Perhaps all we need for artificial intelligence is a simulation of the brain at least as complex as ours. That raises the question, if you build a brain, does it have a mind? For that matter, what happens if you make a simulated brain MORE complex than the human brain? It may not be something we want to know.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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To build better aircraft, watch the birdie (and the bee) - Futurity

To build better aircraft, watch the birdie (and the bee) - Futurity | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

Researchers are taking cues from how birds and bees use vision in flight to design future autopilots and drones. SE


Via Joel Barker
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Jewish Extremists Set Fire To Historic Church In #israel - #barbarism #israel #messianism

Jewish Extremists Set Fire To Historic Church In #israel - #barbarism #israel #messianism | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

 

Jewish Extremists Set Fire To Historic Church In #israel - #barbarism #israel #messianism

A passage from a Jewish prayer, calling for the elimination of idol worship, was found scrawled in red spray paint on a wall outside the church.


Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
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Exchanging Minerva for the Lau Islands – a geopolitical joke

Exchanging Minerva for the Lau Islands – a geopolitical joke | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
Nobody seriously proposed that Tonga give up Minerva Reef in exchange for Fiji's Lau islands
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's insight:

This article needs to be shared in the Fijian newspapers....and yes the humour is a Pacific one...we need to be reminded of it.....

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World Bank Whistleblower Karen Hudes Reveals How The Global Elite Rule The World

World Bank Whistleblower Karen Hudes Reveals How The Global Elite Rule The World | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
(Michael Snyder) Karen Hudes is a graduate of Yale Law School and she worked in the legal department of the…
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's insight:

Interesting article on control and power of the elite....we talk on teh ground about the web ( Prof. Jane Kelsey)....it does sound like, and looks like a web.....

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WHO Invented Binary Math!?

WHO Invented Binary Math!? | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
How old is the binary number system? Perhaps far older than the invention of computers or even the invention of binary math in the West.
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Why Women (and Men Who Think Like Them) Will Rule the Future of Work

Why Women (and Men Who Think Like Them) Will Rule the Future of Work | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

The way we lead our organizations is changing. We need less command-and-control and more collaboration, community and connection. The shift away from traditional masculine values of leading, like aggression, commanding are giving way to feminine values. And this shift is creating innovative and more relevant businesses.

Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's insight:

Feminine values that has emerged as crucial to leadership success in the 21st century: empathetic, family oriented, humble, articulate, nimble, flexible, and intuitive. 


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Rescooped by Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi from Amazing Science
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Zika virus infects human neural stem cells

Zika virus infects human neural stem cells | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

The researchers, led by Guo-li Ming and Hongjun Song of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Hengli Tang of Florida State University, with collaborators at the Emory University School of Medicine, worked around the clock for a month to conduct the study, which provides a new platform to learn about the Zika virus using neuronal cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. In the near future, the researchers hope to grow mini-brains from the stem cells to observe the long-term effects of Zika infection on neural tissue and to screen for potential therapeutics.

 

"This is a first step, and there's a lot more that needs to be done," says Song, a neuroscientist and stem cell biologist. "What we show is that the Zika virus infects neuronal cells in dish that are counterparts to those that form the cortex during human brain development." We still don't know at all what is happening in the developing fetus. These findings may correlate with disrupted brain development, but direct evidence for a link between Zika virus and microcephaly is more likely to come from clinical studies, the researchers say.

 

As humans are typically infected by Zika virus carried by mosquitoes, the researchers also grew their Zika virus stock in mosquito cells for a few days before applying the virus onto the human cells used in all of their infection experiments.

 

One concerning discovery was that the stem cells that Zika was found to infect, called cortical neural precursors, become factories for viral replication. From a single infection, the virus particles spread through a plate of stem cells within a span of three days. There's also no evidence that the cells are employing antiviral responses, which means we don't know whether or how the virus is being cleared from the precursor cells.

 

"There are case reports for the Zika virus where they show that certain brain areas appear to have developed normally, but it is mostly the cortical structures that are missing," says Ming, a neuroscientist interested in brain disorders like microcephaly. "So a very important question that emerges from our work is whether the Zika virus specifically targets the neural progenitor mostly responsible for generating the cortex."

 

There are several other questions left to answer as well: why are the symptoms in adults so mild? How is the virus entering the nervous system of the developing fetus? Zika infects adults when mosquitoes deposit the virus on human skin, and our immune cells carry it into the blood. But how is the virus crossing the blood-brain barrier? And could Zika infect the small population of neural stem cells that adults keep above the brain stem in their hippocampus?

 

"We are trying to fill the knowledge gap between the infection and potential neurological defects," says first author Hengli Tang, the team's virologist whose lab studies RNA viruses like Zika, Dengue, and hepatitis C virus. "The questions we address here are among the very first questions people want to know the answers of."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World Beard and Moustache Championships' hairy competitors

World Beard and Moustache Championships' hairy competitors | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
An Austrian village is bristling with activity, as the World Beard and Moustache Championships get under way.

Via No Such Thing As The News
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JS #Bach / David Oistrakh, 1956: Violin Concerto in E Major, BWV 1042 - Eugene Ormandy #majestuosité

Majestuosité ...

JS #Bach / David Oistrakh, 1956: Violin Concerto in E Major, BWV 1042 - Eugene Ormandy

 

Digitized from the LP shown above, released in 1957 on the Columbia Masterowrks label, catalogue number ML 5087.


Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
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The Fastest Growing Economies

The Fastest Growing Economies | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
See how the world's largest and fastest growing economies change over time.

Via Seth Dixon
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 6:01 AM

growing

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:49 PM

the most surprising thing about this is how india has one of the worlds largest economies but is far behind both the united states and china as well as many european countries in economic growth. also how china can have the worlds number one economy but the united states is so far ahead in economic growth numbers, i suppose that china will not be on top for very long.

Loic's curator insight, June 16, 9:17 AM

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

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Graphene machines created that self-fold like origami, and can walk, grab, and wiggle through tubes

Graphene machines created that self-fold like origami, and can walk, grab, and wiggle through tubes | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

All it takes is a wee blast of heat or light to make it go. Like a robotic inchworm, this flat strip of material reels up and scoots along a lab bench all by itself, turning corners when needed. With other origami-like tricks, the same material rapidly folds itself into a minuscule box, grabs objects, and worms its way through tiny pipes. All this from lightweight, versatile graphene. 


A team of Chinese engineers and materials scientists at Donghua University in Shanghai have just devised a fascinating new method to transform sheets of incredibly strong graphene—atom-thin sheets of carbon often hailed as the supermaterial of the future—into self-folding materials with fantastically promising properties. According to Hongzhi Wang, a researcher with the team, the graphene-based material is lightweight, inexpensive to make, "and the fabrication process is very, very simple. Basically any existing chemistry laboratory could make this," he says. The research is published today in the journalScience Advances. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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40 years of human activities you can see from space

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal.

Via Seth Dixon
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's insight:

Amazing to see  progress and its consequences on earth...our resources and the insatiable hunger for natural resources.....when is enough, enough?

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Ambre Cooper's curator insight, June 25, 2015 4:04 PM

This is a cool little video. It even shows the level of Aral Sea we read about.

Hamdou Wane's curator insight, June 29, 2015 7:55 AM

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 8:45 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: 
This video is simple entry point into the various applications of remote sensing as well as various human and environmental interactions. This video highlights 5 examples: 
 1. Deforestation (Brazil) 
2. Water Use (Aral Sea) 
3. Urban Sprawl (Las Vegas) 
4. Energy (Coal in Wyoming) 
5. Climate Change (Ice Shelf in Antarctica)
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92-Year-Old #Texas Woman Jailed for Protesting Pro-#Fracking State Law

92-Year-Old #Texas Woman Jailed for Protesting Pro-#Fracking State Law | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it

92-Year-Old #Texas Woman Jailed for Protesting Pro-#Fracking State Law

Despite overwhelming citizen support, Denton City Council repeals local anti-fracking ordinance

byLauren McCauley, staff writer
Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
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Congress Should Refuse Donations From Dirty Fossil Fuel Energy Companies - US News

Congress Should Refuse Donations From Dirty Fossil Fuel Energy Companies - US News | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
Members of Congress should refuse campaign donations from fossil fuel industries.

Via Marianne Castiglia
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Marianne Castiglia's curator insight, October 31, 2014 8:23 PM

"Despite the fact that the American people mobilized in historic numbers last month to demand climate solutions, with the march in New York City drawing up to 400,000 people, Washington remains reluctant to listen. And while this public outpouring was further bolstered by an announcement from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund – which was built on an oil fortune – that the foundation will divest from fossil fuels and invest in a sustainable and clean energy economy, the U.S. Congress remains recalcitrant to do the same."

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Is this the new wonder food? - Editors' Picks - NZ Herald News

Is this the new wonder food? - Editors' Picks - NZ Herald News | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
It may not be a fruit that you automatically reach for in the supermarket, but the large and exotic breadfruit is being touted as a wonder food. - New Zealand Herald
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's insight:

I cannot help but see the sarcasm of this article that takes the "uto" or the "mei" together with research facilities in Hawai'i and propose it as a solution for the plight of those suffering from climate change and poverty in the Caribbean!

 

As stated, there are some things that really makes you go "hmmmmm..."

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Amazon.com: The Beer Drinker's Guide to God: The Whole and Holy Truth About Lager, Loving, and Living eBook: William B. Miller: Kindle Store

advice Amazon.com: The Beer Drinker's Guide to God: The Whole and Holy Truth About Lager, Loving, and Living eBook: William B. Miller: Kindle Store

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4109ec4a-5cce-11e3-a16e-22000aa52c0a-original.jpg (720x596 pixels)

4109ec4a-5cce-11e3-a16e-22000aa52c0a-original.jpg (720x596 pixels) | scoops that make you go "hmmmmm.." | Scoop.it
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