Scoopitscoopit Project
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English project on a Midsummer Night's Dream.
Curated by Laura Bailey
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A Midsummer Night's Dream - 1935 ...Oberon & Titania

A Midsummer Night's Dream 1935 Oberon and Titania
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Literary Criticism: The Changeling in A Dream

Literary Criticism: The Changeling in A Dream | Scoopitscoopit Project | Scoop.it
Laura Bailey's insight:

I chose this article because of a curiosity on the topic of the briefly mentioned changeling child mentioned in the beginning of the play. The criticism not only talks about the changeling child, but also on the topic of change and unpredictability present in the play. Although the changeling boy is what has started Oberon and Titania's fight, and therefore the whole situation with the love potions, by the end of the play he has been forgotten. He is briefly mentioned as been turned over to Oberon while Titania was fawning over Bottom, but is otherwise not mentioned. Oberon and Titania's fight appears to be over, but the problem with the changeling child is not truly resolved. When Titania realises her loss of the boy while she was under the spell, she will most likely want him back, as her perception on the whole matter has not been changed at all by having a hazy memory of being in love with Bottom. 

 

Oberon and Titania will simply get into another fight, restarting the matter all over again. Nothing has been truly solved.

 

Of course, this has not been solved any better than the other matters in the play, such as the fact that Lysander's still under mind control, and Hermia's issue with her controlling, overbearing father have been "solved."

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Source: Helen.

Source: Helen. | Scoopitscoopit Project | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Laura Bailey's insight:

I chose this article because I found it interesting how the character's names, and particularly Helena for this article, had meanings and connections to past events. This source traces the routes of Helena's name back to Helen of Troy, and the traits that come with it as both a loved and hated figure. It points out how both Lysander and Demetrius fell blindly in love with Helena, and caused a great amount of chaos in the aftermath. 

 

Helen of Troy would be known for being "the face that launched a thousand ships" and starting the Trojan War. Shakespeare's Helena would break apart Hermia's and Lysander's relationship and cause fighting between Lysander and Demetrius, completed with threats of death. 

 

Shakespeare also used the name of Helena in some of his other plays, such as Cymbeline and All's Well That Ends Well.

 

Works Cited

FINDLAY, ALISON. "Helen." Women In Shakespeare (2010): 181-184. Literary Reference Center. Web. 27 Mar. 2013

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Picture: Bottom

Picture: Bottom | Scoopitscoopit Project | Scoop.it
Laura Bailey's insight:

This picture shows the scene in which the Titania, under the spell of Cupid's flower, is doting on Bottom. You can also see faries about, offering gifts to Bottom as Titania had ordered. This picture emphasies on how much Bottom is an outsider to the fairy world. There is a large size difference between the faries and Titania, a size that is obvious even while Bottom is laying down. He appears to be a giant in this tiny, magical world. Also, Bottom's head has been completely replaced with that of a donkey's, making him not even human. In some depictions of A Midsummer Night's Dream, Bottom head retains some of its human form, only growing ears and longer hair. However, here from the neck up he is completely donkey, and also a complete, and obvious, outsider.

Picture from google images.

 

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Historical Article: ANONYMOUS SHAKESPEARE?

Historical Article: ANONYMOUS SHAKESPEARE? | Scoopitscoopit Project | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Laura Bailey's insight:

I picked this article because it was interesting to read that the plays of Shakespeare may have not been actually written by Shakespeare, or at least not all of it. In summary, the article does agree that yes, there was a man named Shakespeare who wrote many great plays and stories, becoming famous for such by his mid-thirties. In fact, nobody even questioned Shakespeare's authenticity until the 18th century.

 

The most likely scenerio that happened was that Shakespeare's plays were in part written by a technician. This person would edit and suggest parts of the play so to better fit the needs of the actors. One example of this could include how people leave and enter the story, and therefore also the stage.

Works Cited

Berry, Ralph. "Anonymous Shakespeare?." Contemporary Review 293.1703 (2011): 488-492. Literary Reference Center. Web. 27 Mar. 2013.

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