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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from UDL & ICT in education
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The People of Pedagogy Infographic

The People of Pedagogy Infographic | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it
The People of Pedagogy Infographic celebrates the contributions six researchers and educational theorists had on our understanding of pedagogy.

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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:04 AM

Haven't quite got a clue as to why this video ends mid sentence, but it's pretty interesting in its focus on WHY we read. How refreshing to focus on what value literary reading brings to our lives. 

 

On a sort of related note...

Had an opportunity a couple of weeks ago to attend a talk by Tony Taccone and Jonathan Moscone who developed the play Ghost Light based upon Jonathan Moscone's experience as the son of assassinated San Francisco mayor, George Moscone. It's a blend of historical accuracy and a bit of fictionalization. I had seen the play in Ashland Oregon and it was an incredible theater experience.


One of the takeaway lines from the talk is mirrored in this video when Moscone said (paraphrased), "We don't read great literature in order to  read the author's story, we read great literature to read our own stories."



 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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AP Literature vs. College English – On Hiring - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

AP Literature vs. College English – On Hiring - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

AP Literature vs. College English – On Hiring - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education


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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Writers & Books
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Do children still need to read the classics of English literature?

Do children still need to read the classics of English literature? | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

As Nicky Morgan calls for more children to read the classics of English literature, we look at whether such books are still a rite of passage.


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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university
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Chicago School defends its research - business school - management - FT.com

Chicago School defends its research - business school - management - FT.com | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it
The free market theories of "Chicago School" economists have been blamed for the financial crisis. Sunil Kumar, the new dean of Chicago Booth business school, defends the research to Della Bradshaw, business education editor.

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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Creative teaching and learning
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The Flow Theory in the classroom: A primer

The Flow Theory in the classroom: A primer | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

"This is number 6 in my blog series on major learning theories. My plan is to work through the alphabet of psychologists and provide a brief overview of their theories, and how each can be applied in education ..."


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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from The 21st Century
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Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory |

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory | | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

Written by renowned British and American educational theorists, Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory--a substantially revised edition of the original 1999 work-- examines the infusion of postmodernism and theories of ...


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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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The Future of English Literature and Humanities

The Future of English Literature and Humanities | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it
I am a proud, grateful and militant holder of a degree in English literature. It has enhanced and enriched my life in ways that have given me insight into the human condition.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Learning Basic English, to Advanced Over 700 On-Line Lessons and Exercises Free
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Different types of literature and writing PDF - Learning English vocabulary and grammar

Different types of literature and writing PDF - Learning English vocabulary and grammar | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it
Types of literature and the different ways of writing English lesson PDF



Types of literature and the different ways of writing





List of types of literature and the different ways of

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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Why Schools "Fail" or What If "Failing Schools" Aren't? | Noel Hammatt | EdTraveler

Why Schools "Fail" or What If "Failing Schools" Aren't? | Noel Hammatt | EdTraveler | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

Most discussions of "school reform" focus on the need to close or restructure failing schools or else provide students with choice as a way out of them. Embedded within these discussions are theories or suggestions about why these schools are failing. Often left unexamined is the actual claim that these schools are failing.

Since I have had the opportunity to study many schools in Louisiana throughout my career as a member of the faculty in the College of Education at Louisiana State University, and through the lens of my service as a School Board Member for sixteen years, I will focus on schools in Louisiana.

 

When a school in Louisiana is assigned the letter grade F, it is almost universally accepted in the media and in school reform policy debates that children in this school are receiving a sub-standard education, almost by definition since the school itself is seen as "failing." Yet the second part of the title of this paper, which comes from a chapter in the Late Gerald W. Bracey's 2003 book "On the Death of Childhood and the Destruction of Public Schools," raises an interesting question.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Mother tongue the dissertation language - KwaZulu-Natal | IOL News

Mother tongue the dissertation language - KwaZulu-Natal | IOL News | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it
Durban - Local language and education lecturers who are determined to see indigenous languages afforded equal status to English at universities are publishing their work in Zulu and increasing the number of postgraduate students who submit their dissertations in Zulu.

It was a fallacy that one’s intelligence was commensurate with one’s competence in English, it was argued last week at a language colloquium (academic seminar) held by the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Two years ago the University of KwaZulu-Natal announced that it was working towards becoming a dual-medium institution, developing Zulu terminology for disciplines including law, accounting, physics and maths, and had introduced bilingual tutorials for students.

Opening the colloquium, Professor Gregory Kamwendo, dean of the school of education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, said the fear that mother-tongue education meant doing away with English was unfounded.

English and indigenous languages ought to be partners, he said. The battle in Africa, he said, was for the recognition of indigenous languages but also not wanting to exist in a “linguistic cocoon”.

University lecturer Zinhle Nkosi wrote her 2011 PhD thesis on the teaching of Zulu at primary school, in Zulu. It meant finding the right terms to describe research methodology and theories of language and learning – which professors of Zulu helped with.

Since then Nkosi has supervised four Master’s students who submitted dissertations in Zulu. She has also published research written in Zulu in accredited academic journals.

Hilda Israel, the head of applied language studies at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, challenged academics on whether they were listening to the language needs of their students.

“Africa has over 2 000 languages and dialects. Each African child grows up with a wonderful mosaic of sounds and practice reflecting a variety of languages, with English being one of them. And then, as the child grows up, this mosaic gradually loses its unique beauty and transmogrifies into the grey monotone of only English,” Israel said.

“We are African because the language of Africa forms a unique blood that runs through our veins … A blood that gives life to meaning and metaphor and nuance that is rooted in African indigenous knowledge.

It is this identity that is being compromised in the teaching and learning context, with English becoming the sole medium of instruction and assessment.”

Multilingualism, she argued, was a gift and a resource, which, for students, could make the difference between mediocrity and excellence. She said attitudes to African languages needed to change. Language was both a supreme divider, and a tool for uniting people.

“Scorn for a language is actually a masked form of scorn for its speakers … We must remove the perception that competency in English is an indicator of elevated social status, economic progress, and charm.”

Israel argued that a student’s understanding of content in English was enhanced if it was understood in the student’s mother tongue as well.

The Mercury

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Rescooped by Charlotte S Nkosi from Social Media and Healthcare
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Learning theory and its application to the use of social media in medical education

Learning theory and its application to the use of social media in medical education | Scooping ICT | Scoop.it

Abstract

Background There is rapidly increasing pressure to employ social media in medical education, but a review of the literature demonstrates that its value and role are uncertain.

Objective To determine if medical educators have a conceptual framework that informs their use of social media and whether this framework can be mapped to learning theory.

Methods Thirty-six participants engaged in an iterative, consensus building process that identified their conceptual framework and determined if it aligned with one or more learning theories.

Results The results show that the use of social media by the participants could be traced to two dominant theories—Connectivism and Constructivism. They also suggest that many medical educators may not be fully informed of these theories.

Conclusions Medical educators’ use of social media can be traced to learning theories, but these theories may not be explicitly utilised in instructional design. It is recommended that formal education (faculty development) around learning theory would further enhance the use of social media in medical education.


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