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A Printable Guide to Social Media [#Infographic]

A Printable Guide to Social Media [#Infographic] | Scoop4learning | Scoop.it

Ask anyone to name the most popular social media tools used by students, and it’s a safe bet everybody could name the top two: Facebook and Twitter.

But those are far from the only online applications making inroads. As administrators warm to engaging students through social media, the list of potential resources at their disposal grows longer by the day.

 

Facebook and Twitter are the obvious choices. But there are other options- Tumblr, YouTube and Google+, to name three.

Of course, if naming the latest social media tools seems tough, learning how to use them all is harder still. In an attempt to shorten the learning curve, Flowtown and Column Five published this Social Media Cheat Sheet for your reference...


Via Lauren Moss, Carola Brunnbauer, CECI Jean-François, BOUTELOUP Jean-Paul
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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, March 2, 2013 5:16 PM

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Katelm's curator insight, March 4, 2013 5:44 AM

Un résumé graphique pour savoir à quoi correspond les differends réseaux sociaux, comment s'y inscrire et le vocabulaire associé.

Rahadian P. Paramita's curator insight, March 14, 2013 11:00 PM

Cool!

Rescooped by Lockall from Content Curation World
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Scoop4learning | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.


"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"


"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.


Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."


This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.


And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"


What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)



Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10


Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/


(Image credit: Behance.net)




Via Robin Good
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?