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Rescooped by Asti Toro from Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
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The 5 Decisive Components of Outstanding Learning Games

The 5 Decisive Components of Outstanding Learning Games | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, January 9, 2013 3:12 PM

There is a growing trend in education into games for learning. Here are some of the main components for the best of games based learning. 

AnnC's curator insight, January 10, 2013 7:29 PM

Securing engagement through games increases motivation and learning.

Elisabeth's comment, January 17, 2013 10:39 PM
Personally, I just hate games, always did. I satisfy myself with my own challenge, to go further, high better than my own self.... and I'm not the only one !
Rescooped by Asti Toro from Amazing Science
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Will we ever reveal all the secrets of life from DNA? It's very, very hard!

Will we ever reveal all the secrets of life from DNA? It's very, very hard! | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

We may have sequenced the human and other species’ genomes, but we are still nowhere near predicting how this creates a living, breathing organism. Here’s why:

 

In 2001, the Human Genome Project gave us an almost complete draft of the 3 billion letters in our DNA. We joined an elite club of species that have had their genome sequenced, one that is growing with every passing month. As our technologies and understanding advance, will we eventually be able to look at a pile of raw DNA sequence and glean all the workings of the organism it belongs to? Just as physicists can use the laws of mechanics to predict the motion of an object, can biologists use fundamental ideas in genetics and molecular biology to predict the traits and flaws of a body based solely on its genes? Could we pop a genome into a black box, and print out the image of a human? Or a fly? Or a mouse? Not easily. In complex organisms, some traits can be traced back to specific genes. If, for instance, you’re looking at a specific variant of the MC1R gene, chances are you’ve got a mammal in front of you, and it has red hair. Indeed, people have predicted that some Neanderthals were red-heads for precisely this reason. But beyond that, predicting if something is a mouse or a whale or a armadillo, we still can't do it.

 

Bernhard Palsson from the University of California, San Diego agrees. “Sequencing a woolly mammoth will not predict its properties,” he says. “But you might be able to do a lot better with bacteria.” Their simpler and smaller genomes should in theory make it easier to predict the basic features of their metabolism, or whether they grow using oxygen or not. But even though we can sequence a bacterial genome in under a day, and for just $80, we would still struggle to determine important traits, like how good a disease-causing microbe is at infecting its host.

 

Finding all the genes even in a small genome is hard. Earlier this year, scientists discovered a new gene in a flu virus whose genome consists of just 14,000 letters (small enough to fit into 100 tweets), and had been sequenced again and again. So it should be unsurprising that our own genome, with 3 billion letters, is full of errors and gaps, despite ostensibly being “complete”. In May, another group showed that the reference human genome is missing a gene that may have shaped the evolution of our large brains. “There’s no genome that is completely understood even in terms of the genes within it,” says Markus Covert from Stanford University. “Typically, no function is known for a fourth to a fifth of the genes, even in smaller genomes.”

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Asti Toro from Geography Education
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Homemade Butterfly Feeder

Homemade Butterfly Feeder | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

According to a study published in the June 2003 issue of "Conservation Biology," there are 561 known butterfly species in the U.S. and Canada.

 

"Not only are these insects beautiful, they're important pollinators and vital to the health of their natural habitats. You can encourage these gentle creatures to visit your yard by using easy-to-make butterfly food and feeders."


Via Seth Dixon
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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 6:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 6:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 6:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
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Career Education Corp. (NASDAQ:CECO) Long Term Investor ...

Career Education Corp. (NASDAQ:CECO) Long Term Investor ... | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it
(NASDAQ:CECO) shares over potential breaches of fiduciary duties by certain officers and directors of Career Education Corp. was announced and NASDAQ:CECO investors should contact the Shareholders Foundation.
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Rescooped by Asti Toro from Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise..
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Vinod Khosla: Technology Will Replace 80 Percent of Medical Doctors

Vinod Khosla: Technology Will Replace 80 Percent of Medical Doctors | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

Khosla assured the audience that being part of the health care system was a burden and disadvantage. To disrupt health care, entrepreneurs do not need to be part of the system or status quo. He cited the example of CEO Jack Dorsey of Square (a wireless payment system allowing anyone to accept credit cards rather than setup a more costly corporate account with Visa / MasterCard) who reflected in a Wired magazine article that the ability to disrupt the electronic payment system which had stymied others for years was because of the 250 employees at Square, only 5 ever worked in that industry.


Khosla believed that patients would be better off getting diagnosed by a machine than by doctors. Creating such a system was a simple problem to solve. Google’s development of a driverless smart car was “two orders of magnitude more complex” than providing the right diagnosis. A good machine learning system not only would be cheaper, more accurate and objective, but also effectively replace 80 percent of doctors simply by being better than the average doctor. To do so, the level of machine expertise would need to be in the 80th percentile of doctors’ expertise.

 

Health and medical care is an incredible intersection of technology, science, emotions, and human imperfections in both providing care and comfort. As conference speaker Dr. Aenor Sawyer, an orthopedic surgeon from UCSF noted, we need to figure out how to have our different cultures of doctors, gamers, designers, and technologists interact. Fixing health care is more than simply “we know the problem and we know the solution”. She reflected that the level of dedication, perseverance, and a willingness to make impact among the different groups demonstrates more similarities than differences.

 

Perhaps Kholsa’s call to action was simply an entrepreneurial mindset, but simply ignoring those who have chosen a field to improve and safe lives and who meet humanity everyday on the front-lines is problematic and dangerous. There are some things that may never be codified or driven into algorthims. Call it a doctor’s experience, intuition, and therapeutic touch and listening. If start-ups can clear the obstacles and restore the timeless doctor-patient relationship and human connection, then perhaps the future of health care is bright after all.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Asti Toro
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Asti Toro's comment, September 10, 2012 7:52 AM
my husband already said it 10 years ago, your article is confirming it.. thank you to have a confirmation from an expert..
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It’s Time To Build A Space Elevator, Says LiftPort Group In Successful Kickstarter Campaign

It’s Time To Build A Space Elevator, Says LiftPort Group In Successful Kickstarter Campaign | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

Building a tower into the Heavens is a prospect that is likely as old as human civilization itself, and for the last 50 years or so, scientists have proposed that the best way to realize the idea is to construct a space elevator. NASA scientists put together plans for such a tower in 2000, but those efforts have been toppled by funding cuts. Now, a once abandoned group of companies aiming to build the first space elevator has reformed and recommitted to the dream with a campaign on Kickstarter. The LiftPort Group launched the project in mid August with a $8,000 goal and had raised over $40,000 just past the halfway point.


For all the excitement about undertaking such an endeavor, the group’s Kickstarter pitch speculates that a functional Earth Space Elevator is “a long way off. Perhaps 20-25 years.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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AAV2 virus kills breast cancer cells under laboratory conditions

A nondisease-causing virus kills human breast cancer cells in the laboratory, creating opportunities for potential new cancer therapies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers who tested the virus on three different breast cancer types that represent the multiple stages of breast cancer development. Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a virus that regularly infects humans but causes no disease. Past studies by the same researchers show that it promotes tumor cell death in cervical cancer cells infected with human papillomavirus. Researchers used an unaltered, naturally occurring version of AAV2 on human breast cancer cells.

 

Cells have multiple ways of dying. If damage occurs in a healthy cell, the cell turns on production and activation of specific proteins that allow the cell to commit suicide. However, in cancer cells these death pathways often are turned off, while the proteins that allow the cell to divide and multiply are stuck in the "on" position. One way to fight cancer is to find ways to turn on these death pathways, which is what researchers believe is happening with the AAV2 virus.

 

In ongoing studies, the Penn State researchers also have shown AAV2 can kill cells derived from prostate cancer, mesothelioma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. A fourth line of breast cancer cells -- representing the most aggressive form of the disease -- also was studied in a mouse breast tumor model, followed by treatment with AAV2. Preliminary results show the destruction of the tumors in the mice, and researchers will report the findings of those mouse studies soon.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Asti Toro from Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise..
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New school system in Sweden is eliminating classrooms entirely | Impact Lab

New school system in Sweden is eliminating classrooms entirely | Impact Lab | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it
Telefonplan School, in Stockholm Sweden has  new school system that is  eliminating all of its classrooms in favor of an environment that fosters...

Via Mark Smithers, Amy Cross, Asti Toro
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Stuff

Stuff | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it
RT @NZStuff Hundreds protest #Christchurch school closures http://t.co/EqnCc0CT...
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Virgin Money Giving | Blue Ventures

Virgin Money Giving | Blue Ventures | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it
#Education field staff shopping for #school supplies for 192 youth today!
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Rescooped by Asti Toro from cool stuff from research
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New school system in Sweden is eliminating classrooms entirely | Impact Lab

New school system in Sweden is eliminating classrooms entirely | Impact Lab | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it
Telefonplan School, in Stockholm Sweden has  new school system that is  eliminating all of its classrooms in favor of an environment that fosters...

Via Mark Smithers, Amy Cross
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No comment yet.
Rescooped by Asti Toro from Amazing Science
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Vinod Khosla: Technology Will Replace 80 Percent of Medical Doctors

Vinod Khosla: Technology Will Replace 80 Percent of Medical Doctors | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

Khosla assured the audience that being part of the health care system was a burden and disadvantage. To disrupt health care, entrepreneurs do not need to be part of the system or status quo. He cited the example of CEO Jack Dorsey of Square (a wireless payment system allowing anyone to accept credit cards rather than setup a more costly corporate account with Visa / MasterCard) who reflected in a Wired magazine article that the ability to disrupt the electronic payment system which had stymied others for years was because of the 250 employees at Square, only 5 ever worked in that industry.


Khosla believed that patients would be better off getting diagnosed by a machine than by doctors. Creating such a system was a simple problem to solve. Google’s development of a driverless smart car was “two orders of magnitude more complex” than providing the right diagnosis. A good machine learning system not only would be cheaper, more accurate and objective, but also effectively replace 80 percent of doctors simply by being better than the average doctor. To do so, the level of machine expertise would need to be in the 80th percentile of doctors’ expertise.

 

Health and medical care is an incredible intersection of technology, science, emotions, and human imperfections in both providing care and comfort. As conference speaker Dr. Aenor Sawyer, an orthopedic surgeon from UCSF noted, we need to figure out how to have our different cultures of doctors, gamers, designers, and technologists interact. Fixing health care is more than simply “we know the problem and we know the solution”. She reflected that the level of dedication, perseverance, and a willingness to make impact among the different groups demonstrates more similarities than differences.

 

Perhaps Kholsa’s call to action was simply an entrepreneurial mindset, but simply ignoring those who have chosen a field to improve and safe lives and who meet humanity everyday on the front-lines is problematic and dangerous. There are some things that may never be codified or driven into algorthims. Call it a doctor’s experience, intuition, and therapeutic touch and listening. If start-ups can clear the obstacles and restore the timeless doctor-patient relationship and human connection, then perhaps the future of health care is bright after all.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Asti Toro's comment, September 10, 2012 7:52 AM
my husband already said it 10 years ago, your article is confirming it.. thank you to have a confirmation from an expert..
Rescooped by Asti Toro from Geography Education
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Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies

Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies | Scoop will make revolution in world education, no frontiers.. age wise, geographical wise.. | Scoop.it

The lithosphere (Earth's crust) is a hard, rigid plate on top of a softer molten layer known as the asthenosphere.  Sounds like an Oreo to me!  As a crude analogy that lets you bring food into the classroom, this lesson on plate boundaries sound like a winner.  For an academic article on how to use Oreo's to teach about Earth's crust, see: http://dusk.geo.orst.edu/oceans/Oreo-Cookie.pdf     


Via Seth Dixon
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