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Ghost story or true story !
Curated by Dany Fortin
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Vast Freshwater Reserves Discovered Under Ocean Floor, Scientists Say

Vast Freshwater Reserves Discovered Under Ocean Floor, Scientists Say | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

Massive reserves of "freshwater" are buried beneath the seabed on continental shelves around the world, including off Australia, China, North America and South Africa.


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RoboEarth Project: Connecting robots world-wide

RoboEarth Project: Connecting robots world-wide | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
At its core, RoboEarth is a World Wide Web for robots: a giant network and database repository where robots can share information and learn from each other about their behavior and their environment.

 

Bringing a new meaning to the phrase “experience is the best teacher”, the goal of RoboEarth is to allow robotic systems to benefit from the experience of other robots, paving the way for rapid advances in machine cognition and behaviour, and ultimately, for more subtle and sophisticated human-machine interaction.

 

RoboEarth offers a complete Cloud Robotics infrastructure, which includes everything needed to close the loop from robot to RoboEarth to robot. The RoboEarth World-Wide-Web style database is implemented on a server with Internet and Intranet functionality, making it attractive for both research and business applications. It stores information required for object recognition (e.g., images, object models), navigation (e.g., maps, world models), tasks (e.g., action recipes, manipulation strategies) and hosts intelligent services (e.g., image annotation, offline learning).

 

To close the loop, the RoboEarth Collaborators have implemented components for a ROS compatible, robot-unspecific, high-level operating system as well as components for robot-specific, low level controllers accessible via a Hardware Abstraction Layer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Laser-like photons signal major step towards quantum ‘Internet’

Laser-like photons signal major step towards quantum ‘Internet’ | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

The realisation of quantum networks is one of the major challenges of modern physics. Now, new research shows how high-quality photons can be generated from ‘solid-state’ chips, bringing us closer to the quantum ‘Internet’. We are at the dawn of quantum-enabled technologies, and quantum computing is one of many thrilling possibilities.

 

The number of transistors on a microprocessor continues to double every two years, amazingly holding firm to a prediction by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore almost 50 years ago.

 

If this is to continue, conceptual and technical advances harnessing the power of quantum mechanics in microchips will need to be investigated within the next decade. Developing a distributed quantum network is one promising direction pursued by many researchers today.

 

A variety of solid-state systems are currently being investigated as candidates for quantum bits of information, or qubits, as well as a number of approaches to quantum computing protocols, and the race is on for identifying the best combination. One such qubit, a quantum dot, is made of semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in a chip and can be controlled electro-optically.

 

Single photons will form an integral part of distributed quantum networks as flying qubits. First, they are the natural choice for quantum communication, as they carry information quickly and reliably across long distances. Second, they can take part in quantum logic operations, provided all the photons taking part are identical.

 

Unfortunately, the quality of photons generated from solid-state qubits, including quantum dots, can be low due to decoherence mechanisms within the materials. With each emitted photon being distinct from the others, developing a quantum photonic network faces a major roadblock.

 

Now, researchers from the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University have implemented a novel technique to generate single photons with tailored properties from solid-state devices that are identical in quality to lasers. Their research is published today in the journal Nature Communications.

 

As their photon source, the researchers built a semiconductor Schottky diode device containing individually addressable quantum dots.  The transitions of quantum dots were used to generate single photons via resonance fluorescence – a technique demonstrated previously by the same team.

 

Under weak excitation, also known as the Heitler regime, the main contribution to photon generation is through elastic scattering. By operating in this way, photon decoherence can be avoided altogether. The researchers were able to quantify how similar these photons are to lasers in terms of coherence and waveform – it turned out they were identical.

 

“Our research has added the concepts of coherent photon shaping and generation to the toolbox of solid-state quantum photonics,” said Dr Mete Atature from the Department of Physics, who led the research.

“We are now achieving a high-rate of single photons which are identical in quality to lasers with the further advantage of coherently programmable waveform - a significant paradigm shift to the conventional single photon generation via spontaneous decay.”

 

There are already protocols proposed for quantum computing and communication which rely on this photon generation scheme, and this work can be extended to other single photon sources as well, such as single molecules, colour centres in diamond and nanowires.

“We are at the dawn of quantum-enabled technologies, and quantum computing is one of many thrilling possibilities,” added Atature.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Tech Time Warp of the Week: RCA’s Wireless Wizard, 1961

Tech Time Warp of the Week: RCA’s Wireless Wizard, 1961 | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
This is an epic six-minute commercial for the "greatest advance in television since color television itself": RCA's 1961 wireless remote control.
    
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A real «Ghost» story from a sucessfull Kickstarter crowdsourcing campaign

A real «Ghost» story from a sucessfull Kickstarter crowdsourcing campaign | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

A publishing platform which is beautifully designed, easy to use, and free for everyone. Start your blog

Dany Fortin's insight:

Unlike other open source projects to launch on Kickstarter, O'Nolan claims Ghost has a sustainable business model as it will offer a paid-for hosting service.

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Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each

Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
From Ancient Greece to quantum mechanics, or what a Chinese room and a cat have to do with infinity.

From the fine folks at the Open Univ
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 9, 2013 6:08 AM

........"........

..  From the fine folks at the Open University comes 60-Second Adventures in Thought, a fascinating and delightfully animated series exploring six famous thought experiments.

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S. un livre concept conçu par J.J. Abrams, écrit par Doug Dorst | Experience Transmedia | Transmedia news…

S. un livre concept conçu par J.J. Abrams, écrit par Doug Dorst | Experience Transmedia | Transmedia news… | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

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ITER, the multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment with goal to generate power by 2028

ITER, the multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment with goal to generate power by 2028 | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

Delays in the installation of key parts of ITER, a multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment, are forcing scientists to change ITER’s research programme to focus exclusively on the key goal of generating power by 2028. As a result, much research considered non-essential to the target, including some basic physics and studies of plasmas aimed at better understanding industrial-scale fusion, will be postponed. A 21-strong expert panel of international plasma scientists and ITER staff, convened to reassess the project’s research plan in the light of the construction delays. The plans were discussed at a meeting of ITER’s Science and Technology Advisory Committee (STAC). The meeting is the start of a year-long review by ITER to try to keep the experiment on track to generate 500 MW of power from an input of 50 MW by 2028, and so hit its target of attaining the so-called Q ≥ 10,where power output is ten times input or more.


ITER, which will be the world’s largest tokamak thermonuclear reactor (see ‘A fusion of ideas’), is being built in St-Paul-lez-Durance in southern France by the European Union, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia and the United States at a cost of €15 billion (US$20.3 billion). Q ≥ 10 is seen as its raison d’être, and achieving it would be likely to revitalize public and political interest in fusion. Crucial to that is getting to the point, scheduled for 2027, when the first nuclear fuel would be injected into the reactor. The fuel will be a plasma of two heavy hydrogen isotopes, deuterium and tritium (DT).


The original 2010 research plan foresaw the entire reactor being built by 2020, when ITER was also scheduled to produce its first plasma, using hydrogen as a test fuel. But cost-cutting and cash-flow problems in member states mean that while the reactor is likely to be operating by then, the delivery of some parts is being deferred until several years later. These include some diagnostics devices for analysing the physics of plasmas at the very large scales of ITER, and elements of the heating system that will eventually take the plasmas to 150,000,000 °C.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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odysseas spyroglou's curator insight, November 5, 2013 10:28 AM

Will such a project recharge our energy sources ?

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Morpher bike helmet folds flat when you aren't wearing it

Morpher bike helmet folds flat when you aren't wearing it | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
Although it's entirely possible that a bicycle helmet could save your life one day, that still doesn't change the fact that the things take up a lot of spac...
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How to make 3D art out of coffee froth -

How to make 3D art out of coffee froth - | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
If regular coffee bores you, for whatever reason, and you are looking for something more than a standard caffeine boost in the morning, you should probably look no further than Kohei Matsuno's unique style of 3D coffee art (How to make 3D art out ...

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1,500-year-old Roman gold coin unearthed at Chinese tomb

1,500-year-old Roman gold coin unearthed at Chinese tomb | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
The finding is yet another proof of a long history of exchange between the Eastern and the Western civilizations.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:52 AM

There was constant trade between empires.  This coin found buried in China shows that there was trade and communication between China and Rome. 

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Une ville flottante pour 50.000 habitants

Une ville flottante pour 50.000 habitants | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
Une entreprise américaine vient de lancer un appel à investisseurs pour construire une ville flottante pour 50 000 habitants. Délirant ? Sans doute. Utopique ? L’avenir le dira, mais ce n’est pas le premier projet du genre...

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Why computers of the next digital age will be invisible

Why computers of the next digital age will be invisible | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
Computers are hi-tech, right? Our children may not see it that way. The next generation of digital devices will be hidden, bringing both benefits and dangers.

Via Soraia Ferreira, Ph.D.
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Comet ISON is down, but not out! | EarthSky.org

Comet ISON is down, but not out! | EarthSky.org | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
The comet is definitely showing some signs of life. post-perihelion.
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'4-Billion-Year Old' Mars Fly-Over Shows Water and Blue Skies | Video

Features on the Red Planet of today suggest that oceans of liquid water once traversed parts of the planet. This animation imagines how it could of looked an...
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Tracking 4 Comets through November

Tracking 4 Comets through November | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

Tired of comets yet? Right now, northern hemisphere observers have four (!) comets within range of binoculars in the dawn sky. Comet C/2012 S1 ISON, is, of course, expected to dazzle towards month’s end. Comet 2P/Encke is an “old standby,” with the shortest orbital period of any comet known at 3.3 years, and is making a favorable appearance this Fall. And comet C/2012 X1 LINEAR added to the morning display recently, reaching about +8th magnitude in an unexpected outburst…

But the brightest and best placed comet for morning viewing is currently Comet C/2013 R1 Lovejoy.


Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/106222/tracking-comet-c2013-r1-lovejoy-through-november/#ixzz2kYPSNzZw

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5 Tips on Social Media from the Beastie Boys

5 Tips on Social Media from the Beastie Boys | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
Combining a love of the Beastie Boys and social media, here are 5 social media tips from the Beastie Boys.
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Jet Capsule Miniature Luxury Yacht

Jet Capsule Miniature Luxury Yacht | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it
Although by definition, it’s not technically a yacht, the Jet Capsule aims to bring the same luxury experience on the water (with family and friends) through a much smaller, more maneuverable solution.
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Hovenring: The First Suspended Bicycle Roundabout

Hovenring: The First Suspended Bicycle Roundabout | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

When a roundabout intersection in the Netherlands became too busy for cars and bikes to share space, the design agency ipv Delft came up with a beautiful solution to separate the two transportation forms completely: an elevated bicycle roundabout.

Called the Hovenring, the structure holds the distinction of being the first suspended bicycle roundabout in the world. The entire futuristically styled ring is supported by the needle shaped central pylon, lending the delicately designed structure an appearance of levitation. This is only enhanced by a shape that resembles a flying saucer and night time illumination around, above and below the ring.


Via Lauren Moss
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When the ice man came: Early mammoth hunters braved the Arctic

When the ice man came: Early mammoth hunters braved the Arctic | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

Our hardy ancestors survived north of the Arctic Circle as far back as the last ice age, unearthed tools now reveal. The mammoth hunters braved sub-zero temperatures on desolate tundra at least 20,000 years earlier than was thought, the remains suggest, although whether the people were Neanderthals or modern humans is a mystery.

 

The artefacts, dug up in an Arctic riverbed, show that humans once lived as far north as Siberia and Alaska, say archaeologist John Svendsen, of the University of Bergen in Norway, and his team1. The stone tools, horse and reindeer bones and a mammoth tusk with hand-made markings, were found at Mamontovaya Kurya in European Russia.

 

Radiocarbon dating puts the finds between 35,000 and 40,000 years old. Previously, humans were thought to have colonized this northern region in the last stages of the ice age only some 13,000 years ago.

The 40,000-year date "marks a turning point in the history of human evolution in Europe," says Svendsen's team. Around that time, roaming Neanderthals are thought to have given way to anatomically modern humans migrating northwards out of Africa and into Europe. The new haul does not reveal the identity of the Arctic dwellers to be either Neanderthal or modern.

 

Either way the result is exciting, says archaeologist John Gowlett of the University of Liverpool, UK. Either Neanderthals travelled further north than was thought, or modern humans moved and adjusted to northern extremes very quickly - within a few thousand years of leaving hotter climes.

 

Temperatures seem to have fluctuated markedly at that time, pushing populations north or south. Early modern humans may have followed herds of mammoths, wild horses or reindeer northwards during a warmer period, speculates Gowlett. During colder spells, freezing steppes extended as far south as Greece. "Humans had a hold on the north, if only for a short time," he says.

 

To survive at these latitudes, humans have to be well adapted, explains anthropologist Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London. Temperatures fall to -40°C and there is 24-hour darkness for part of the year.  "You've got to have clothing, housing and fire," he says. Eating meat and fat would have been important, as there are few plants. Cold-dwelling populations such as the Inuits also have physiological differences that make them more tolerant to the cold. Whereas modern humans are known for their ability to survive in extreme conditions, Neanderthals were thought to lack such skills. If the remains are Neanderthal, then "they were not a load of numbskulls," says Gowlett.

 

Our view of the historic landscape in which the hunters lived is also changing. The animal bones add to mounting evidence that this region of the Arctic, although cold, was not ice-bound 35,000 years ago. Instead, it probably consisted of open, grassy steppes. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic

From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic | Scoop.it Doo!!! | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Kristina Schneider's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:36 PM

"Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."

Yes! 

Michael Britt's comment, October 27, 2013 12:27 PM
I think the points above are excellent. I only wish "content consumers" if you will, agreed with this message. I say that because I have been critisized by one consumer because he didn't feel that I gave him ENOUGH content on a topic. In other words, in many content consumer's minds, A LOT OF CONTENT = VALUE. Hopefully the public is going to realize that this is not true.
Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:56 PM

A useful article on the  role of journalists by Jonathan Stray. He postulates that rather than writing stories, journalists should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic, by applying filtering, social curation, visualistion and interaction with their audience. I think the professional press has woken up to this, and commend the Guardian for their insightful reporting.