Scientific Psycho...
Follow
Find
10 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from Counselling and More
onto Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology
Scoop.it!

RSA Shorts - The Power of Empathy

What is the best way to ease someone's pain and suffering? In this beautifully animated RSA Short, Dr Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities.


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Ina Saltvik's insight:

The power of empathy. Cute animation about making empathic connections.

more...
Karolina Kuran's comment, December 15, 2013 10:58 AM
Very much true! Thanks for sharing it!
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 20, 2013 3:46 AM

"S" une arnaque ? "S" sincère ? A vous de voir !
http://belgouche.worldgn.com/ et aussi et surtout 
http://belgouche.adkash.com/

Lisa A Romano's curator insight, January 4, 2014 5:09 AM

For psychology practitioners and or students of MI - this RSA offers a beautiful visual depiction of the spirit of MI (or Motivational Interactions)...

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

First "mini human brains" grown from stem cells

First "mini human brains" grown from stem cells | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it

Scientists have grown the first mini human brains in a laboratory and say their success could lead to new levels of understanding about the way brains develop and what goes wrong in disorders like schizophrenia and autism.

 

Researchers based in Austria started with human stem cells and created a culture in the lab that allowed them to grow into so-called "cerebral organoids" - or mini brains - that consisted of several distinct brain regions. It is the first time that scientists have managed to replicate the development of brain tissue in three dimensions.

 

Using the organoids, the scientists were then able to produce a biological model of how a rare brain condition called microcephaly develops - suggesting the same technique could in future be used to model disorders like autism or schizophrenia that affect millions of people around the world.

 

"This study offers the promise of a major new tool for understanding the causes of major developmental disorders of the brain ... as well as testing possible treatments," said Paul Matthews, a professor of clinical neuroscience at Imperial College London, who was not involved in the research but was impressed with its results.

 

Zameel Cader, a consultant neurologist at Britain's John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, described the work as "fascinating and exciting". He said it extended the possibility of stem cell technologies for understanding brain development and disease mechanisms - and for discovering new drugs.

 

Although it starts as relatively simple tissue, the human brain swiftly develops into the most complex known natural structure, and scientists are largely in the dark about how that happens. This makes it extremely difficult for researchers to gain an understanding of what might be going wrong in - and therefore how to treat - many common disorders of the brain such as depression, schizophrenia and autism.

 

To create their brain tissue, Juergen Knoblich and Madeline Lancaster at Austria's Institute of Molecular Biotechnology and fellow researchers at Britain's Edinburgh University Human Genetics Unit began with human stem cells and grew them with a special combination of nutrients designed to capitalize on the cells' innate ability to organize into complex organ structures. They grew tissue called neuroectoderm - the layer of cells in the embryo from which all components of the brain and nervous system develop.

 

Fragments of this tissue were then embedded in a scaffold and put into a spinning bioreactor - a system that circulates oxygen and nutrients to allow them to grow into cerebral organoids.

 

After a month, the fragments had organized themselves into primitive structures that could be recognized as developing brain regions such as retina, choroid plexus and cerebral cortex, the researchers explained in a telephone briefing.

 

At two months, the organoids reached a maximum size of around 4 millimeters (0.16 inches), they said. Although they were very small and still a long way from resembling anything like the detailed structure of a fully developed human brain, they did contain firing neurons and distinct types of neural tissue.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Alexis Meneses Arévalo's curator insight, August 29, 2013 2:28 PM

DALCAME

olsen jay nelson's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:19 PM

If we can't ask the brains any questions, then ...

Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

RSA Shorts - The Power of Empathy

What is the best way to ease someone's pain and suffering? In this beautifully animated RSA Short, Dr Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities.


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Ina Saltvik's insight:

The power of empathy. Cute animation about making empathic connections.

more...
Karolina Kuran's comment, December 15, 2013 10:58 AM
Very much true! Thanks for sharing it!
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 20, 2013 3:46 AM

"S" une arnaque ? "S" sincère ? A vous de voir !
http://belgouche.worldgn.com/ et aussi et surtout 
http://belgouche.adkash.com/

Lisa A Romano's curator insight, January 4, 2014 5:09 AM

For psychology practitioners and or students of MI - this RSA offers a beautiful visual depiction of the spirit of MI (or Motivational Interactions)...

Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from addiction and its treatment
Scoop.it!

The Impact Of Genetics And Environment On Drug Abuse Risk - NewRelevant | New Addiction Information

The Impact Of Genetics And Environment On Drug Abuse Risk - NewRelevant | New Addiction Information | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it

The risk of abusing drugs is greater - even for adopted children - if the family environment in which they are raised is dysfunctional, according to a new study


Via IntegratedTrtmt
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ina Saltvik
Scoop.it!

Study Suggests Sleep Clears Brain of Damaging Molecules Associated With Neurodegeneration

Study Suggests Sleep Clears Brain of Damaging Molecules Associated With Neurodegeneration | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it
Bethesda, MD (Scicasts) – A good night's rest may literally clear the mind.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era

Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it

The psychiatric drug age may have reached its peak. Although mind-altering medications are being prescribed in record numbers, signs of a radically new approach to understanding and treating mental illness are emerging from the deep waters of neuroscience. No longer focused on developing pills, a huge research effort is now devoted to altering the function of specific neural circuits by physical intervention in the brain.


Via Sandeep Gautam, Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Venitta Lateer's comment, September 25, 2013 8:09 PM
You need to look into what is called Non-Leathal, it is used by the Police & Military it cab do all that and much more, I can not look into it, myself, as i am under a investigation, and they make sure that I can not get a hold of dam near anything i need, that is unless it has the ability to make me look crazy or paranoid, thus your post, lol. But if you really want to do that kind of thing, and work, you really should look into Non-Leathal

Your article was AWESOME !!! Posted it on Facebook :)
P.S. NO I do not think that you are in on ANYTHING with the FBI over my case, they just make sure that I find things like this, lol, Sigh :(
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:16 AM

This is either exceedingly good news or extremely dangerous...

William baldwin's curator insight, January 4, 11:31 PM

Change the way we lead people through Brain Science

Scooped by Ina Saltvik
Scoop.it!

A Calm Look at the Most Hyped Concept in Neuroscience – Mirror Neurons - Wired

A Calm Look at the Most Hyped Concept in Neuroscience – Mirror Neurons - Wired | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it
A Calm Look at the Most Hyped Concept in Neuroscience – Mirror Neurons
Wired
Last year I suggested that mirror neurons are the most hyped concept in neuroscience.
Ina Saltvik's insight:

A down to earth reflection on Mirror Neurons.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ina Saltvik from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience Of Trusting Your Gut

The Neuroscience Of Trusting Your Gut | Scientific Psychology: Neuroscience & Neuropsychology | Scoop.it

Why should you trust your gut? Because science says it's the foundation of rational decision making. Rather than being opposed, emotion and reason are deeply interrelated: if you're going to make sound and rational decisions.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
No comment yet.