Scientific life
182 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Genome study to pursue Richard III's medical history | Chemistry World

Genome study to pursue Richard III's medical history | Chemistry World | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Scientists hope sequencing of last Plantagenet king's genome will reveal more about his appearance and health (Genome study to pursue Richard III's medical history - Chemistry World http://t.co/ipJVc0dJQz)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Online Video Game Plugs Players Into Real Biochemistry Lab

Online Video Game Plugs Players Into Real Biochemistry Lab | Scientific life | Scoop.it

Crowdsourcing is the latest research rage—Kickstarter to raise funding, screen savers that number-crunch, and games to find patterns in data—but most efforts have been confined to the virtual lab of the Internet. In a new twist, researchers have now crowdsourced their experiments by connecting players of a video game to an actual biochemistry lab. The game, called EteRNA, allows players to remotely carry out real experiments to verify their predictions of how RNA molecules fold. The first big result: a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, bearing the names of more than 37,000 authors—only 10 of them professional scientists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Un nuovo metodo per ottenere staminali pluripotenti - Le Scienze

Un nuovo metodo per ottenere staminali pluripotenti - Le Scienze | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Celle somatiche di topi appena nati, coltivate in vitro in condizioni di basso pH, possono tornare a una condizione di cellule pluripotenti, con una capacità di dare nuovamente origine a linee cellulari mature molto simile a quella delle staminali pluripotenti indotte. Il risultato, ottenuto con una metodica sperimentale relativamente semplice, apre nuove prospettive nel campo della medicina rigenerativa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simona De Vita from Science & Politics
Scoop.it!

9 Habits of Highly Effective Speakers

9 Habits of Highly Effective Speakers | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Whether you're giving a wedding toast or an address to thousands, here are nine key practices from the best public speakers in history.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Carmine Cappetta
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Zebrafish Stripes Caused by Cells That Chase Each Other

Zebrafish Stripes Caused by Cells That Chase Each Other | Scientific life | Scoop.it

A cellular game of run-and-chase could help form the iconic stripes on zebrafish skin. Contact between two types of skin cells, the black “melanophores” and the yellow “xanthophores," prompts the melanophores to move away and the xantophores to follow in hot pursuit, developmental biologists report online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers’ models suggest that such interactions lead to the pigment cells separating into the distinct bands of zebrafish stripes. To understand how interactions between cells might lead to striped or spotted skin, the scientists found a way to grow pigment cells from zebrafish tail fins in lab dishes. Pigment cells of the same type didn’t seem to interact. But when xanthophores and melanophores were near each other, the yellow cells (apparently attracted) reached out to touch the black ones. The black ones, in turn, were repulsed by the overture and moved away. Undeterred, the xanthophores followed. (In the video, a yellow xanthophore chases a gray melanophore across the screen.) Cells from a zebrafish mutant called jaguar, which has broader, fuzzier stripes, behaved differently. Their black melanophores do not run from the yellow xanthophores, and the xanthophores do not chase them as ardently. This, the researchers say, could explain the mixed populations of yellow and black cells in the stripes’ fuzzy borders. The team hasn’t yet observed the cell movements in developing fish, but the work may help explain why mutations in genes that make proteins that are part of cell membranes can lead to different skin patterns in fish. It may also help explain how other animals—zebras, jaguars, leopards, or Dalmatians—get their patterned skin.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Cristallized alcohol

Cristallized alcohol | Scientific life | Scoop.it
The crystalline compounds of different types of alcohol under a polarized light microscope by scientist Michael Davidson of BevShots.

Upper left =...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Simona De Vita from Medicin
Scoop.it!

How Your Personality Changes When You Speak in a Foreign Language

How Your Personality Changes When You Speak in a Foreign Language | Scientific life | Scoop.it

Have you ever seen someone speaking two languages and feel as if two different people are speaking them?


Via EFL SMARTblog, Alex Rada
more...
Alex Rada's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:36 AM

It all depends on where you study language

Aldemar Valencia Martinez's curator insight, November 10, 2013 4:42 PM

Sharing another language is, really,  to share another culture . . .

Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Animal Rights Fliers Shock Italian Researchers

Animal Rights Fliers Shock Italian Researchers | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Activists post photos, addresses, and phone numbers of scientists on the streets of Milan
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Dalle staminali una terapia genica contro i tumori - Le Scienze

Dalle staminali una terapia genica contro i tumori - Le Scienze | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Un gruppo di ricercatori dell'Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele di Milano e dell'Istituto Telethon per la terapia genica (TIGET) è riuscito a intervenire sulle staminali ematopoietiche, da cui hanno origine tutte le cellule del sangue, in modo...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Biggest Virus Yet Found, May Be Fourth Domain of Life?

Biggest Virus Yet Found, May Be Fourth Domain of Life? | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Newfound pandoraviruses have opened up entirely new questions about microbial life as we know it, a new study says.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Brain Tricks - This Is How Your Brain Works - YouTube

Get the book: http://amzn.to/U2MRGI TWEET VIDEO - http://clicktotweet.com/SIfb3 Ever wonder how your brain processes information? These brain tricks and illu...
Simona De Vita's insight:

Brilliant!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition - Acute effects of violent video-game playing on blood pressure and appetite perception in normal-weight young men: a randomized controlled trial

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition - Acute effects of violent video-game playing on blood pressure and appetite perception in normal-weight young men: a randomized controlled trial | Scientific life | Scoop.it
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition is a high quality, peer-reviewed journal that covers all aspects of human nutrition.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

The science of blue flowers | MNN - Mother Nature Network

The science of blue flowers | MNN - Mother Nature Network | Scientific life | Scoop.it
In fact, “blue is a color that is infrequent in nature,” said David Lee, who wrote the book "Nature's Palette: The Science of Plant Color" before retiring in 2009 as a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

The Fear of Being Short

The Fear of Being Short | Scientific life | Scoop.it

If you think that others are out to get you, stand tall. A new study finds that people who perceive themselves as short are more likely to experience feelings of paranoia. Researchers took 60 women with a history of paranoia on a simulated trip in a subway car via a virtual reality headset. The subjects went on the ride twice, but on one trip, the scientists lowered their perspective by 25 cm to make them feel shorter than the other riders. Though the women were often unaware that their vantage point had changed, when they felt shorter, they scored two points higher on a test rating their level of paranoia. They also described feeling vulnerable and that more people had stared at them, researchers report in Psychiatry Research. The results may be useful for treating paranoia by finding that these delusions are rooted in feelings of inferiority. Though they tested only women, the scientists expect that the same experiment in men would cause even more distress, because men generally place greater importance on height and are more likely to exaggerate their own size.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Earth Won't Die as Soon as Thought

Earth Won't Die as Soon as Thought | Scientific life | Scoop.it

Take a deep breath—Earth is not going to die as soon as scientists believed. Two new modeling studies find that the gradually brightening sun won’t vaporize our planet's water for at least another 1 billion to 1.5 billion years—hundreds of millions of years later than a slightly older model had forecast. The findings won’t change your retirement plans but could imply that habitable, Earth-like alien worlds are more common than scientists thought.

Humans are warming the planet by emitting heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide. But behind the scenes, a far slower, deadlier warming process is unfolding. The sun is getting brighter and hotter over time. As it does, more water evaporates from Earth’s surface into the atmosphere, where it traps additional heat from the planet. This water-driven greenhouse effect will keep going long after people have stopped burning fossil fuels that now add CO2 to the atmosphere. Eventually, Earth’s greenhouse effect will spin out of control, vaporizing all of our planet’s water and ending life as we know it.

How long does Earth have? Climate modelers disagree. In one recent study, planetary scientist Ravi Kopparapu of Pennsylvania State University (Penn State), University Park, and colleagues used computers to model how Earth would respond to increasing solar radiation. Just 6% more sunlight was enough to send the greenhouse effect into overdrive and vaporize Earth’s water, the researchers found. At the current rate of solar brightening—just over 1% every 100 million years—Earth would suffer this “runaway greenhouse” in 600 million to 700 million years. Earth will suffer some preliminary effects leading up to that, too. After just 150 million years, the researchers found, the stratosphere will warm enough to let some water vapor reach high in the sky, where solar radiation will break it down into molecules that can escape to space. In this "moist greenhouse," the planet would be too hot for complex surface life, but a few hardy marine organisms and microbes could soldier on.

But not so fast, says Eric Wolf, a doctoral student at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Kopparapu’s model is pretty rudimentary, Wolf says: It analyzes what happens in one dimension—altitude. As a result, the model excludes clouds and wrongly assumes that climate factors like humidity are the same everywhere on Earth. Wolf and his Boulder colleague, Owen Brian Toon, simulated Earth’s future using a more realistic 3D climate model from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Their model included clouds, and a host of other details such as regional differences in moisture, Wolf says. It also assumed that atmospheric CO2 levels would start at 500 parts per million—25% higher than today—and stay there indefinitely.

Then Wolf and Toon cranked up the sun. After they made our star 15.5% brighter than it is today, the simulated Earth had warmed from its current average of 15°C to 40°C. That’s hot, but not too hot for liquid water to survive. The oceans didn’t boil off. The stratosphere also didn't heat up, so no moist greenhouse occurred either. The upshot: Earth has at least 1.5 billion years left to support life, the researchers report this month in Geophysical Research Letters. If humans last that long, Earth would be generally uncomfortable for them, but livable in some areas just below the polar regions, Wolf suggests. Earth warms slower than in Kopparapu’s model, Wolf explains, because clouds and dry regions such as deserts, both of which the 1D study lacked, send a lot of heat back into space.

A similar 3D climate-modeling study, reported last month in Nature, found that a runaway greenhouse wouldn’t occur for at least 1 billion years. The leader of that study—Jérémy Leconte, an astrophysicist now at the University of Toronto in Canada—says his group’s earlier date for Earth’s demise than Wolf and Toon’s stems partly from differences in how the studies modeled clouds.

The 3D models shed new light on how long Earth could potentially support life, says planetary scientist James Kasting of Penn State University Park, who wasn’t involved in either study. Still, they may slightly underestimate how long Earth could support life, he suggests. The studies assume that CO2 levels stay the same, Kasting says, but they may actually fall as Earth warms. That’s because calcium carbonate rock formation and other natural carbon-sequestering processes might speed up in warmer conditions, pulling CO2 from the atmosphere and blunting warming at least temporarily. He also cautions that the studies don’t model life’s response, so they can’t assess how long life actually will survive.

Kasting says the studies may be most useful for refining estimates of sunlike stars’ habitable zones: the range of distances at which orbiting rocky planets can host abundant liquid water. Kopparapu’s 1D study, on which Kasting was a co-author, suggested that our solar system’s habitable zone starts at 0.97 to 0.99 astronomical units (AUs), just inside Earth’s average orbit of 1 AU. The new studies, if correct, suggest that Earth-like worlds orbiting sunlike stars have a bit more breathing room: Leconte’s group’s study pegs the inner limit at 0.95 AU, and Wolf and Toon’s at 0.93. This change could mean that our galaxy harbors 5% to 6% more habitable planets than previously thought, Leconte estimates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

ScienceShot: Pupils Predict the Future

ScienceShot: Pupils Predict the Future | Scientific life | Scoop.it

Want to read someone’s mind? Look at their pupils. A person about to answer “yes” to a question, especially if they are more used to answering “no,” will have more enlarged pupils than someone about to answer “no,” according to a new study. Normally, pupils dilate when a person is in a darkened environment to let more light into the eye and allow better vision. But pupil size can also be altered by levels of signaling chemicals naturally produced by the brain. In the study, published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists observed the pupils of 29 people as they pressed a “yes” or “no” button to indicate whether they’d seen a difficult-to-detect visual cue on a screen in front of them. When a person was deciding how to answer—in the seconds before pressing a button—their pupils grew larger. And if a person was normally biased toward answering “no” when they weren’t sure on the visual cue, then the pupil change was even more profound in the decision-making seconds before a “yes” answer. The finding could lead to new ways to detect people’s intrinsic biases and how confident they are in an answer given, important variables in many sociological and psychological studies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Match burning in slow motion - YouTube

This is a macro sequence of a match burning. It was shot @ 4000 FPS. As you can see this is an extremely tight shot. There was over 2000 wats of light within...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Video: How to Freeze and Defrost a Frog

Video: How to Freeze and Defrost a Frog | Scientific life | Scoop.it

AUSTIN—For wood frogs in Alaska's interior, Arctic weather is more than a temporary, headline-grabbing phenomenon. Frigid temperatures are the norm for months at a time. But these tiny amphibians cope quite well and represent an extreme in freeze-tolerant organisms, researchers reported here Monday at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. For two seasons, they followed wood frogs to where they dug in for the winter and put temperature sensors next the frogs' skin and in the surrounding leaf litters, discovering that 100% of the 18 animals coped well despite being frozen solid for 7 months, with temperatures sometimes dropping to -18°C. That was much longer than frogs survived in the lab under cold conditions. Experiments proved that this remarkable survival rate stems from the gradual buildup of the sugar glucose in their cells. In the lab, researchers had at first gradually cooled the frogs, thinking that slow cooling gives the animals time to make glucose, which helps cells retain water that would otherwise seep out and freeze. But in nature, during October, frogs undergo more than a dozen nightly freezes and daily thaws (see video). Each cycle boosts glucose several-fold, increasing its winter concentration up to fivefold compared with frogs frozen without this cycling and giving them an extra edge in the cold. The 7 months represent a record for frozen vertebrates, and while Siberian salamanders have lived through -30°C temperatures for shorter durations, those salamanders did not have as good a survival rate as the wood frogs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

A 73 anni crea fantastici dipinti con Excel

A 73 anni crea fantastici dipinti con Excel | Scientific life | Scoop.it
La storia di Tatsuo Horiuchi, un artista di 73 anni in grado di realizzare dei dipinti delicati e profondamente armoniosi, che rispecchiano le tradizionali pitture giapponesi, utilizzando esclusivamente Excel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Sea Slug Named After Daenerys Targaryen, Game Of Thrones Fandom Has Reached A New Level

Sea Slug Named After Daenerys Targaryen, Game Of Thrones Fandom Has Reached A New Level | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Forget the Iron Throne, Dany, this is what your destiny has been leading you towards.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Scoperto da dove nasce e perché si diffonde l’Alzheimer

Scoperto da dove nasce e perché si diffonde l’Alzheimer | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Notizie online in tempo reale del quotidiano La Stampa con foto e video in diretta.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Simona De Vita
Scoop.it!

Qual è la parola che in tutto il mondo si pronuncia ugualmente?

Qual è la parola che in tutto il mondo si pronuncia ugualmente? | Scientific life | Scoop.it
Con lievi sfumature fonetiche a seconda dello specifico idioma parlato, il monosillabo 'Eh?' sarebbe un termine comprensibile da tutte le culture del Pianeta.
more...
No comment yet.