Scientific anomalies
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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 10:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 19, 2015 4:32 AM

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The Human and Natural World

While I do enjoy this video, it is especially interesting in in how it conceptualizes the world in the two frames.  Urban, human, civilized society on one side, with natural, unsettled wilderness on the other.  The video attempts to bridge the divide, hoping that more people will see more interconnections between the human/urban world and the natural/wildlife world.  While geographers recognize that all elements of the planet are interconnected, most people still think of the world through dichotomies such as these: civilization vs. wilderness, cultural vs. natural and human vs. animal.  How do these terms shape our thinking about the world?     

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