Sciences & Technology
3.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Sciences & Technology
Veille sur les évolutions des sciences et des technologies
Curated by Terheck
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Terheck from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Earthquakes reveal deep secrets beneath East Asia | PHYS.org

Earthquakes reveal deep secrets beneath East Asia | PHYS.org | Sciences & Technology | Scoop.it

A new work based on 3-D supercomputer simulations of earthquake data has found hidden rock structures deep under East Asia. Researchers from China, Canada, and the U.S. worked together to publish their results in March 2015 in the American Geophysical Union Journal of Geophysical Research, Solid Earth.

 

The scientists used seismic data from 227 East Asia earthquakes during 2007-2011, which they used to image depths to about 900 kilometers, or about 560 miles below ground.

 

Notable structures include a high velocity colossus beneath the Tibetan plateau, and a deep mantle upwelling beneath the Hangai Dome in Mongolia. The researchers say their line of work could potentially help find hidden hydrocarbon resources, and more broadly it could help explore the Earth under East Asia and the rest of the world.

 

"With the help of supercomputing, it becomes possible to render crystal-clear images of Earth's complex interior," principal investigator and lead author Min Chen said of the study. Chen is a postdoctoral research associate in the department of Earth Sciences at Rice University.

 

Chen and her colleagues ran simulations on the Stampede and Lonestar4 supercomputers of the Texas Advanced Computing Center through an allocation by XSEDE, the eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment funded by the National Science Foundation.

 

"We are combining different kinds of seismic waves to render a more coherent image of the Earth," Chen said. "This process has been helped by supercomputing power that is provided by XSEDE."

 

"What is really new here is that this is an application of what is sometimes referred to as full waveform inversion in exploration geophysics," study co-author Jeroen Tromp said. Tromp is a professor of Geosciences and Applied and Computational Mathematics, and the Blair Professor of Geology at Princeton University.

 

In essence the application combined seismic records from thousands of stations for each earthquake to produce scientifically accurate, high-res 3-D tomographic images of the subsurface beneath immense geological formations.

 

Click headline to read more, access hot link and view 3D grahics--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terheck from Free Online Education Present and Future Technology
Scoop.it!

Real-time Earthquake Map

Real-time Earthquake Map | Sciences & Technology | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards...

 

This map represents the 1079 earthquakes with magnitudes higher than 2.5 that have occured in the last 30 days.  You can customize the map to display different data at any scale.  There is detailed information about each earthquake in this great dataset. 


Via Seth Dixon, Erskine S.Weekes-Libert
more...
Trisha Klancar's comment, August 18, 2012 8:33 AM
I've used this often and kids love it. It is visual and allows them to realize what is happening at that very moment and PERHAPS gets them to see the world doesn't revolve around them! hee,hee
Scooped by Terheck
Scoop.it!

Arecibo Observatory Undergoing Emergency Repairs After Earthquake Causes Damage

Arecibo Observatory Undergoing Emergency Repairs After Earthquake Causes Damage | Sciences & Technology | Scoop.it
The Arecibo Observatory’s 305 meter (1,000 ft) radio telescope is undergoing emergency repair after being damaged during a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on January 13, 2014. A large cable that supports the telescope's receiver platform had “serious damage,” according to Bob Kerr, the Director of the Arecibo Observatory. “A protocol structural survey following the January 13…
more...
No comment yet.