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Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Inflation: The Big Mysteries of Cosmology

Dr. Michael S. Turner, Professor, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago. Presented Feb. 15, 2011

 

Our current cosmological model describes the evolution of the universe from a very early burst of accelerated expansion (known as inflation) a tiny fraction of a second after the beginning, through the assembly of galaxies and large-scale structure shaped by dark matter, to our present epoch where dark energy controls the ultimate fate of the universe. As successful as it is, this model rests upon three mysterious pillars: inflation, dark energy and particle dark matter. All three point to exciting and important new physics that have yet to be revealed and understood -- or possibly, to a fatal flaw in the paradigm.

 

The University of Arizona College of Science's Cosmic Origins lecture series is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Join the six speakers who will explore cosmology's historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.
http://cos.arizona.edu/cosmic/

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Kevin Warwick: My life as a CyborgBORG

KEVIN WARWICK: MY LIFE AS A CYBORG - SFI SPEAKER SERIES

Kevin Warwick is Professor of Cybernetics at the University of Reading, England, where he carries out research in artificial intelligence, control, robotics and biomedical engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer (CEng.) and is a Fellow of The Institution of Engineering & Technology (FIET). He is the youngest person ever to become a Fellow of the City & Guilds of London Institute (FCGI).

The Institute of Physics selected Kevin as one of only 7 eminent scientists to illustrate the ethical impact their scientific work can have: the others being Galileo, Einstein, Curie, Nobel, Oppenheimer and Rotblat.

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Molecular Movies - A Portal to Cell & Molecular Animation

Molecular Movies - A Portal to Cell & Molecular Animation | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Adhesion / Extracellular Matrix - Angiogenesis / Metastasis - Apoptosis - Cell Division / Cell Cycle - Chemistry / Organic Synthesis - Cytoskeleton / Molecular Motors - Developmental Processes - Disease / Immune System - DNA / Chromatin - Drug / Mechanism of Action - Evolution / Origins of Life - Metabolic / Respiration - Neuronal Signaling - Prokaryotes - Protein Folding & Stability - Replication - RNA Stability & RNAi - RTKs & Signal Transduction - Stem Cells - Transcription - Translation - Viruses / Infectious Disease


Via dromius
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Samantha Lipsky's curator insight, May 23, 2013 12:20 AM

Very cool visualizations.

aamoros2's curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:36 PM

Películas de animación molecular de células.

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Michio Kaku: What's the Fate of the Universe? It's in the Dark Matter

Why should you bother to wake up tomorrow knowing that we're all going to die billions and billions of years from now when the universe turns to absolute zero, when the stars blink out, when we have nothing but neutron stars and black holes? Dr. Kaku says that billions of years from now we may be able to move to a different universe.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Genetics in Mendelian Human Disease - Broad Institute (2012)

The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease.

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VIDEO lecture: First steps in scientific data visualisation using d3.js - by Drew Conway

Mike Dewar (Data Scientist, bit.ly), presents a talk on getting started with data driven design in Javascript to the New York Open Statistical Programming Meetup on Jan. 12, 2012. Mike Bostock's d3 javascript library has lately taken the internet by storm, being the engine underlying a very beautiful set of visualisations (mbostock.github.com/d3/). Because of this, many have investigated d3.js as a potential addition to their current visualisation stack, only to fall over one of some common hurdles. This talk will demonstrate how to clear these first few hurdles, including:
- how to create and serve nice data objects
- how to use chrome's console to inspect and play with your visualisation,
- how d3 interacts with the document object model,
- how to draw arbitrary SVG objects,
- how to use d3.layout to relieve you of a few common graph-vis tasks.

The talk will be useful to those who are curious about using d3.js and wants to get started making interactive and dynamic statistical visualisations. You can download the slides (all written with d3.js) from Mike Dewar's Github: github.com/mikedewar/d3talk

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Photons to Bits and Beyond: The Science & Technology of Digital

The Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science presents the 2011 Victor M. Tyler Distinguished Lectureship in Engineering with Eric Fossum, Professor of Engineering in Dartmouth's Thayer School and a consultant to Samsung Electronics' Semiconductor R&D Center. Dr. Fossum, who earned a PhD in electrical engineering from Yale in 1984, is one of the world's leading solid-state image sensor device physicists, best known for inventing the CMOS image sensor. His "camera-on-a-chip" technology is used in nearly all camera phones and webcams, digital-still cameras, high-speed motion capture cameras, automotive cameras, dental x-ray cameras, and swallowable pill cameras.

 

An entrepreneur as well as inventor, Fossum's transfer of his own IP portfolio to industry has yielded one of Caltech's greatest licensing revenue streams, and he has served as CEO of two successful high-tech companies. His work was included on Reuters' list of "Baby Boomer Inventions that Changed the World," and Forbes calls him an inventor who has "changed your life."


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Seth Lloyd's Lecture about Quantum Limits to the Measurement of Spacetime Geometry

Seth Lloyd's Lecture about Quantum Limits to the Measurement of Spacetime Geometry | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

This talk analyzes the limits that quantum mechanics imposes on the accuracy to which spacetime geometry can be measured. By applying the fundamental physical bounds to measurement accuracy ensembles of clocks and signals, as in the global positioning system, I present a covariant version of the quantum geometric limit, which states that the total number of ticks of clocks and clicks of detectors that can be contained in a four volume of spacetime of radius R and temporal extent is less than or equal to RT divided by the Planck length times the Planck time. The quantum geometric bound limits the number of events or 'ops' that can take place in a four-volume of spacetime and is consistent with and complementary to the holographic bound which limits the number of bits that can exist within a three-volume of spacetime.

 

More Seth Lloyd Videos: http://tinyurl.com/9ozxym3

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Radiation and Material Science Applications (35 hr video lecture series)

X-Ray Interaction with Matter, Synchrotron Radiation, etc. 35 hours of lectures

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Blind Mice, No Longer

In a study published on April 19, 2011 in the journal Molecular Therapy, researchers at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT and the University of Southern California used optogenetic technology to restore vision in blind mice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jY5Aynh1-cU

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NASA: Astronomers Uncover a Surprising Trend in Galaxy Evolution

A study of 544 star-forming galaxies observed by the Keck and Hubble telescopes shows that disk galaxies like our own Milky Way unexpectedly reached their current state long after much of the universe's star formation had ceased. Over the past 8 billion years, the galaxies lose chaotic motions and spin faster as they develop into settled disk galaxies.

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Video Of Rarely Seen Pelagic Argonaut Octopus Out Of Its Shell

Argonaut is a type of octopus most commonly found in tropical and subtropical seas. Its presence in temperate waters of Southern California indicate that warm water currents from the South are prevalent. Argonauts are pelagic (usually found far offshore in the open ocean) and demonstrate a dramatic sexual dimorphism (male is about one inch long and females up to 18 inches). The male argonaute has one of it's eight arms (the third) highly modified to carry sperm to the female. The modified arm of the male is called a hectocotylus and during mating this arm breaks off and crawls into the female to remain there until the female is ready to fertilize her eggs. When first discovered in the early 1800s the hectocotylus arm was thought to be a parasitic worm and was given the species name of Hectocotylus (therefore the origin of the term hecotocotylus arm of cephalopods).

 

The female argonaut makes a thin, laterally compressed calcareous shell with one chamber that is used as a brood pouch for eggs. The first of the eight arms of the female bears a wide sail-like lobe that is used to secrete and form the shell. The shell looks like an extinct ammonid shell or resembles shells from the extant cephalopod group called nautiluses. Thus, argonautes are commonly referred to as "paper nautiluses", however, they are octopuses and not closely related to nautiluses. Due to their beauty and delicate nature, argonaute shells are highly prized by collectors

 

Argonauts eat plankton like krill, shrimp and pelagic snails. A recent paper describes an argonaut positioned on the top of a jellyfish and eating away the bell to be able to send arms down through the jelly to remove plantonic food in the jelly's stomach.

 

Argonauts are eaten by tuna, billfish and blue sharks

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Implicating Sequence Variants in Human Disease: Daniel MacArthur (13 VIDEOs)

September 12-13, 2012 - Implicating Sequence Variants in Human Diseases

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Life in the Oceans - Deep Mysteries - Water Documentary VIDEOS (15 hours)

Life in the Oceans - Deep Mysteries - Water Documentary VIDEOS (15 hours) | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
All videos are collected on Water Documentary channel!
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Over 50 years of laser - 39 VIDEO lectures about lasers

Lasers and Photonics (from the 50th Anniversary of the Laser)

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Michio Kaku: Can Nanotechnology Create Utopia?

Dr. Kaku addresses the question of the possibility of utopia, the perfect society that people have tried to create throughout history. These dreams have not been realized because we have scarcity. However, now we have nanotechnology, and with nanotechnology, perhaps, says Dr. Michio Kaku, maybe in 100 years, we'll have something called the replicator, which will create enormous abundance.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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35 VIDEO Lectures from the FQXi Interdisciplinary Meeting Investigating the Nature of "Time"

FQXi SETTING TIME ARIGHT conference, an interdisciplinary meeting investigating the nature of time.

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Video Archive Of The Singularity University

Video Archive Of The Singularity University | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

"The Singularity University aims to assemble, educate and inspire a cadre of leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies and apply, focus and guide these tools to address humanity's grand challenges."


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The wisdom of birds

The bullfinch is a truly remarkable bird. Its striking colors are reason enough to adore it but, what's more, male bullfinches can be trained to sing any song you like, provided you are willing to sing to it 15 times a day for months! You can learn more about bullfinch songs here.

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Perimeter Institute Seminars: Leonard Susskind (20 Video Lectures) about Cosmology

Perimeter Institute Seminars: Leonard Susskind (20 Video Lectures) about Cosmology | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Beyond the Standard Cosmological Model

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Crockford on JavaScript - 12 hours of Javascript Language Videos

Douglas Crockford puts the JavaScript programming language in its proper historical context, tracing the language's structure and conventions (and some of its quirks) back to their roots in the early decades of computer science.

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Tim O'Reilly: Birth of the Global Mind

Tim O'Reilly discusses how evolving technology has disrupted society, and has given birth to the global mind.

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Anthony Atala: Printing a human kidney

Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala's young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

 

It's exciting to see the development of 3D printing move from little objects to human organs. This advancement illustrates soon many objects will be printable from home - with a printer we drop resources into, or even a sorter that breaks apart other objects to salvage resources for new products.

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The strange new world of Nanoscience – Narrated by Stephen Fry

The strange new world of Nanoscience – Narrated by Stephen Fry | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Where and what is nano? How will it shape our future? Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and manipulation of materials at the nanoscale, where properties differ significantly from those at a larger scale. The strange world of nanoscience – it can take you into atoms and beyond the stars.

 

Winner Best short film at the Scinema Science film festival 2010.

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