Science-Videos
12.1K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Science News
onto Science-Videos
Scoop.it!

Michio Kaku: What's the Fate of the Universe? It's in the Dark Matter

Why should you bother to wake up tomorrow knowing that we're all going to die billions and billions of years from now when the universe turns to absolute zero, when the stars blink out, when we have nothing but neutron stars and black holes? Dr. Kaku says that billions of years from now we may be able to move to a different universe.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Science-Videos
Learn Science At Home Through Videos
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Neil deGrasse Tyson – Amazing Lecture on Science & Astronomy [Sept. 2017]

Born and raised in New York City, astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson discovered his love for the stars at an early age. After studying at Harvard University, he earned his doctorate from Columbia University in 1991. Tyson went to work for the Hayden Planetarium in 1996 and still serves as its director. He hosted the NOVA ScienceNow series from 2006 to 2011. Tyson remains a popular TV science expert today and has amassed over 3.6 million followers on Twitter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

A WISE search for large extraterrestrial civilizations: a complementary approach to traditional SETI

Speaker: Jason T. Wright, Penn. State University Slides: http://www2.astro.psu.edu/%7Ejtwright/Dyson/SETI.pdf 

 

If alien civilizations exist throughout the universe, many have had billions of years to develop technology, expand their population and energy supplies, and travel across their galaxies. Kardashev classified hypothetical advanced civilizations by the magnitude of their power supply, with Type II civilizations harnessing most of the energy output of their host star, and Type III civilizations using most of the power in their galaxy. As Dyson pointed out in 1960, the waste heat emitted by a such civilizations would easily overwhelm that of their host star or galaxy, distinguishing them from "normal" astrophysical sources. This approach to SETI makes few assumptions about the behavior of alien civilizations, primarily: conservation of energy, the laws of thermodynamics, and that given the age of the Universe aliens have had time to develop very large energy supplies.

The WISE all-sky mid-infrared survey has dramatically improved our ability to detect such civilizations and to distinguish them from "natural" astrophysical sources. I will discuss our team's efforts to identify candidate Type II civilizations in the Milky Way and Type III civilizations throughout the low-redshift universe. Because the scope and assumptions of this approach are complementary to those of telecommunication SETI, a null result has the potential to rule out broad classes of proposed resolutions to the Fermi-Hart Paradox, particularly those that invoke organization of advanced alien species across the Milky Way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Professor Sir Roger Penrose: Can we ever see signals before the Big Bang?

In 2005, Dr. Penrose proposed the unconventional scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC). This takes what is currently regarded as the entire history of the universe, from its Big-Bang origin (with no inflationary phase) to its final exponential expansion, to be but one aeon of a continual succession of such aeons. The big bang of each is taken to be an infinitely scaled down continuation of the exponentially expanding remote future of the previous one. A positive cosmological constant (dark energy) and some primordial scalar material (dark matter) are both essential to CCC's consistency. Supermassive black-hole encounters in the aeon previous to ours would have observational implications for CCC, detectable within the cosmic microwave background. Recent evidence of such signals in both the WMAP and Planck satellite data will be presented.

About the Speaker:
Sir Roger Penrose OM FRS, is a mathematical physicist, mathematician and philosopher of science. He is the Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford, as well as an Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College. Penrose is known for his influential work in mathematical physics, in particular for his contributions to general relativity and cosmology. He has received a number of prizes and awards, including the 1988 Wolf Prize for physics, shared with Stephen Hawking for their contribution to our understanding of the universe. Popular science works include The Emperor's New Mind, Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness, and The Road To Reality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Life, the Universe, and Nothing: A Cosmic Mystery Story "

Lawrence Krauss' work has been primarily in theoretical (as opposed to experimental) physics, and he has published research on a great variety of topics within that field. Krauss is a renowned cosmologist and popularizer of modern science and director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. Hailed by Scientific American as a rare public intellectual, he is the author of more than three hundred scientific publications and 8 books, including the bestselling The Physics of Star Trek, and the recipient of numerous international awards for his research and writing.

 

Dr. Krauss is an internationally known theoretical physicist with wide research interests, including the interface between elementary particle physics and cosmology, where his studies include the early universe, the nature of dark matter, general relativity and neutrino astrophysics. His soon to be published book, A Universe From Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing is already garnering strong reviews. Exploring the scientific advances that provide insight into how the universe formed, Krauss ultimately tackles the age-old assumption that something cannot arise from nothing by arguing that not only can something arise from nothing, but something will always arise from nothing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Weirdest planets discovered by NASA's Kepler satellite so far

Take a look at some of the strangest exoplanets discovered so far.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Acidic Oceans: Why Should We Care? - Perspectives on Ocean Science

The ocean absorbs almost half of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, changing its chemistry in ways that may have significant effects on marine ecosystems. Join Scripps marine chemist Andrew Dickson as he explains what we know -- and what we don't -- about this emerging problem.

 

Collection of videos about tidal energy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

The Future of Robotics - Max Versace

Massimiliano Versace, director of the Boston University Neuromorphics Lab and CEO of Neurala, Inc., talks about the future of robotics. He specifically talks about the robot body, brain and mind. These three components are advancing rapidly to form the future of robots.

 

Though robotics seems the technology of the future, it actually has its roots in ancient history. The study and field of robotics can be traced back to approximately 300 B.C. in Ancient China. The Muslim inventor Al-Jazari is credited with inventing a humanoid robot in 1206. By the 20th century, the field of robotics was one that held great fascination and offered virtually limitless possibilities. As technology began to focus on the development of computers, so too did the study of robotics continue to move forward. The 60s was a time that both computers and robotics saw great advancement. In 1961, the first industrial robot was used at the General Motors plant. By the 21st century, the automotive industry and manufacturing plants saw widespread use of robots for commercial production.

When it comes to pinpointing the first robot created; there is a bit of confusion. In addition to the robot created in 1206 by Al-Jazari, Leonardo da Vinci is credited with building a mechanical man referred to as the anthrobat. In 1921, Karel Capek used the word “robota” to describe slave like labor in his play titled Rossum’s Universal Robots. The word became associated with the humanoid prototypes. During the 1940s, Missouri native, William Grey Walter developed a robot named Elise the tortoise. In 1961, while at MIT, Heinrich Ernst created a computer that operated a mechanical hand called the MH-1. By 1962, General Motors used the first industrial arm robot that would ensure people remained safe while performing difficult tasks on the assembly line. Several other robots and computer programs were created that helped advance the field of robotics.

 

It was not until the 1950s that industrial robotics really took off. As technological advancements were made in areas such as electronics and computers, so too, did robotics make vast strides. During the 50s, Alan Turing released the “Turing Test” which attempted to measure whether or not machines or robots could think for themselves.

In 1961, General Motors utilized the first industrial robot. The robot was named Unimate and Devol and Engelberger created it. The robot performed welding and die casting work at the New Jersey plant. As robotics made an impact on manufacturing and industry, its uses to assist humans were being explored. In 1963, the “Rancho Arm” was created to assist handicapped people. Today, robotics has revolutionized the way handicapped people can reclaim the use of lost limbs. More robotic arms were developed and by 1969, the Stanford Arm marked the first robotic arm controlled electrically via a computer. By 1973, industrial robots were controlled by computers and the T3, created by Richard Hohn was available for commercial sale. In 1976, robotic arms were used by both Viking 1 and Viking 2 for space exploration. By 1980, the official robotic age was underway. More robots were developed and perfected during the last part of the 20th century, with robots finding their way to the silver screen, in hospital rooms, in space, and in industries such as automotive and manufacturing. By the 21st century, the science behind Humanoid robots was developed with companies such as Hanson Robotics that developed the humanoid “Jules” and a realistic looking “Albert Einstein” that walks and talks.

 

The 21st century sees robotics in everyday use. The automotive industry is full of robots that complete tasks often too difficult for humans to accomplish. Many assembly lines and manufacturing companies are manned by robots instead of people. Television stations use robotics for video production and filming. Where once man stood behind a camera and filmed inside a studio, many of these tasks are now accomplished by robots. Robotics has revolutionized the medical industry, as robotic surgery is now a staple in hospital rooms. Amputees are now experiencing the power of robotics with newly designed limbs that can respond to sensations and pressure as human limbs complete with nerves would. The field of robotics continues to advance brining new technological advances to many factors of society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

A trick to visualizing higher dimensions

How do you think about a sphere in four dimensions? What about ten dimensions? Problem driven learning on at https://brilliant.org/3b1b

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory DNA Learning Center

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory DNA Learning Center | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

The mission of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's DNA Learning Center is to prepare students and families to thrive in the genomic age.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Beyond Beauty: The Predictive Power of Symmetry

From a bee’s hexagonal honeycomb to the elliptical paths of planets, symmetry has long been recognized as a vital quality of nature. Einstein saw symmetry hidden in the fabric of space and time. The brilliant Emmy Noether proved that symmetry is the mathematical flower of deeply rooted physical law. And today’s theorists are pursuing an even more exotic symmetry that, mathematically speaking, could be nature’s final fundamental symmetry: supersymmetry. Join some of the world’s preeminent scientists to explore the core role symmetry plays in our unraveling of nature’s deepest secrets—and catch a glimpse of profoundly important symmetries that may be awaiting us just over the horizon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Possible life, but Not as We Know It  - The Prospects of Life in Titan's Seas (SETI Talks)

The prerequisites for life are thought to be: (1) a liquid solvent; (2) chemical building blocks; and (3) an energy source. Life like we have on the Earth uses water for its solvent and organic molecules for its building blocks. Hence searches for Earth-like life can focus on habitable zones around stars where liquid water can be stable on planetary surfaces.

But is water the only solvent in which life can exist? Though more exotic solvents (like ammonia, liquid nitrogen, or supercritical carbon dioxide) may exist in extrasolar systems, the only surface liquids outside of Earth that we know about today occur on Saturn's smoggy moon Titan.

Dr Barnes will describe these seas, their chemistry, and hydrology, with an eye toward whether they could serve as possible abodes for life. Recent Cassini discoveries show evaporitic bathtub rings and 'salt' flats around seas, which indicate that at least some materials do dissolve in the lakes. He will also discuss new Cassini RADAR evidence for compositional variations between the seas, and VIMS observations that may show the first sea-surface waves ever seen outside of Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Using Ultra-lightweight Von Neumann Probes to Catalyze Interstellar Exploration (SETI Talk)

Based on present space science and engineering, interstellar travel remains highly unlikely. Applying synergistic emerging technologies to enhance capabilities for accelerated space development in the solar system may catalyze possible steps to the stars. A stepwise sequence of plausible projects will be proposed. The remarkable present progress in diverse applied sciences can be a game changer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Gravity and Quantum Mechanics - The Quest for Unification

Quantum mechanics and relativity tell us that when we look at the very small, the very fast, or the very massive.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

The Extreme World of Ultra Intense Lasers

The most powerful lasers in the world can be used to make some of the most extreme conditions possible on earth, and are revolutionizing science.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

SETI Talks Series [196 videos]: How can we find intelligent life in the universe?

SETI Talks Series [196 videos]: How can we find intelligent life in the universe? | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7B4FE6C62DCB34E1

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Quantum Origins of Space and Time

Renate Loll from Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics delivers a lecture on Searching for the Quantum Origins of Space and Time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

MIT Forum: Molecular Manufacturing in 2017

Can industry as we know it be made obsolete? If so, then the problems of the 21st century, including climate disruption, are not as they seem. Dr. Andrew Ban gives his valuable insight.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Dr. Eric Drexler - Remaking the 21st Century

Can industry as we know it be made obsolete? If so, then the problems of the 21st century, including climate disruption, are not as they seem. Physical principles indicate the feasibility of developing a high-throughput atomically precise manufacturing technology that operates at low cost, with common materials, and with an extraordinary scope of application. The prospective technology resembles 3D printing, but capable of producing, for example, photovoltaics, jet engines, and nanoscale digital electronics. Rapid progress in atomically precise fabrication, primarily in the molecular sciences, points the way to an incremental development path that leads to a genuinely revolutionary set of capabilities. This prospect calls for a multifaceted shift in today's research agenda.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Google DeepMind's Demis Hassabis: AI's future and its unlimited capabilities

Watch the founder of Google DeepMind's Demis Hassabis' lecture about the future and capabilities of artificial intelligence.

 

Google's DeepMind's founder Demis Hassabis lecturs about the future and capabilities of artificial intelligence. Hassabis was born to a Greek father and a Chinese mother and grew up in North London. A child prodigy in chess, Hassabis reached master standard at the age of 13 with an Elo rating of 2300 (at the time the second highest rated player in the world Under-14 after Judit Polgár who had a rating of 2335) and captained many of the England junior chess teams. He is a pioneering British artificial intelligence researcher, neuroscientist, computer game designer, entrepreneur, and world-class Go games player.

 

Currently, there are over 250 PhDs and 400 research scientists working on DeepMind’s unlimited funding projects with two main goals in mind. The first is to try and solve intelligence and figure out how the human brain became capable of taking over the planet. The second is use that intelligence to do everything else. If this latter point can be achieved, Google will soon become the most powerful entity on Earth.

 

And you may laugh, but thus is not some crazy far fetched idea either. These goals are for real, and the company is more than happy to talk freely with anyone about it. To get an even deeper understanding of what their plans involve why not check out a recent presentation given by Demis Hassabis, founder of DeepMind, who will talk you through their ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Natalie Batalha Kepler: Searching for a Planet Inside the Goldilocks Zone

Not too hot, not too cold reads the prescription for a world that's just right for life as we know it. Finding evidence of life beyond Earth is one of the primary goals.

 

Natalie is an astrophysicist and the project scientist for NASA’s Kepler Mission, a space observatory launched by NASA to discover Earth-sized planets orbiting other stars. As one of the original co-investigators of the Kepler Mission, Natalie has been a leader in using the telescope to discover exoplanets, which are planets that orbit stars other than our own sun. Natalie has been involved in the Kepler Mission since the proposal stage and has helped identify more than 150,000 stars that are monitored by the telescope.

 

She holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from The University of California Berkeley, and a doctoral degree in astrophysics from UC Santa Cruz. She taught physics and astronomy for 10 years at San Jose State University before joining the Space Sciences Division of the NASA Ames Research Center, which is located in California’s Silicon Valley.

 

In 2011, Natalie received a NASA Public Service Medal for her vision in communicating Kepler’s science to the public, and also for her outstanding leadership in coordinating the Kepler science team. That same year Natalie also headed up the analysis that led to the discovery of Kepler 10b, the first confirmed rocky planet outside our solar system.

 

She joined the leadership team of a new NASA initiative in 2015, which is dedicated to the search for evidence of life beyond our solar system. Called the Nexus for Exoplanet System Science, the program brings together teams from multiple disciplines to understand the diversity of worlds, and which of those exoplanets are most likely to harbor life.

 

As if Dawn and the STEM-Talk gang weren’t excited enough after talking to Natalie about the search for life beyond our solar system, NASA announced about a month after our interview with Natalie that its Spitzer Space Telescope had revealed the first known system of seven Earth-sized planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where a rocky planet is most likely to have liquid water.

 

According to a NASA press release in February, the discovery sets a new record for greatest number of habitable-zone planets found around a single star outside our solar system. All of these seven planets could have liquid water – key to life as we know it – under the right atmospheric conditions, but the chances are highest with the three in the habitable zone.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

The incredible inventions of intuitive AI

What do you get when you give a design tool a digital nervous system? Computers that improve our ability to think and imagine, and robotic systems that come up with (and build) radical new designs for bridges, cars, drones and much more -- all by themselves. Take a tour of the Augmented Age with futurist Maurice Conti and preview a time when robots and humans will work side-by-side to accomplish things neither could do alone.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Science-Videos
Scoop.it!

NCBI YouTube Channel: Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology Information

NCBI YouTube Channel: Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology Information | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology Information including presentations and tutorials about NCBI biomolecular and biomedical literature databases and tools.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

3D Mandelbulb — Flying into the depth of a mathematical structure

A long flight into a 3D Mandelbrot structure, for 14 minutes. 20950 frames at 25 fps. Frames size : 1064*600 pixels. Realized with : Mandelbulber. Music : Beethoven - 7th symphony, 4th movement, Beethoven - 8th symphony, 4th movement

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Deep Learning, Self-Taught Learning and Unsupervised Feature Learning

Graduate Summer School: Deep Learning, Self-Taught Learning and Unsupervised Feature Learning

more...
No comment yet.