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VIDEO lecture: First steps in scientific data visualisation using d3.js - by Drew Conway

Mike Dewar (Data Scientist, bit.ly), presents a talk on getting started with data driven design in Javascript to the New York Open Statistical Programming Meetup on Jan. 12, 2012. Mike Bostock's d3 javascript library has lately taken the internet by storm, being the engine underlying a very beautiful set of visualisations (mbostock.github.com/d3/). Because of this, many have investigated d3.js as a potential addition to their current visualisation stack, only to fall over one of some common hurdles. This talk will demonstrate how to clear these first few hurdles, including:
- how to create and serve nice data objects
- how to use chrome's console to inspect and play with your visualisation,
- how d3 interacts with the document object model,
- how to draw arbitrary SVG objects,
- how to use d3.layout to relieve you of a few common graph-vis tasks.

The talk will be useful to those who are curious about using d3.js and wants to get started making interactive and dynamic statistical visualisations. You can download the slides (all written with d3.js) from Mike Dewar's Github: github.com/mikedewar/d3talk

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Turning a Sphere Inside-out

It is possible to turn a sphere inside out in 3-space with possible self-intersections but without creating any crease, a process often called sphere eversion (eversion means "to turn inside out").

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Andreas Dewes: Let's build a quantum computer!

Andreas Dewes explains why quantum computing is interesting, how it works and what you actually need to build a working quantum computer. He uses the superconducting two-qubit quantum processor which he built during his PhD thesis as an example to explain its basic building blocks. He shows how this processor can be used to achieve so-called quantum speed-up for a search algorithm that can be run on it. Finally, he gives a short overview of the current state of superconducting quantum computing and Google's recently announced effort to build a working quantum computer in cooperation with one of the leading research groups in this field.

 

Google recently announced that it is partnering up with John Martinis - one of the leading researchers on superconducting quantum computing - to build a working quantum processor. This announcement has sparked a lot of renewed interest in a topic that was mainly of academic interest before. So, if Google thinks it's worth the hassle to build quantum computers then there surely must be something about them after all?

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7 TED Talks on how your brain constructs reality

7 TED Talks on how your brain constructs reality | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Do we experience the world as it really is? Find out with these talks that explain why we see the world the way we do.

Via Fernando Gil, CineversityTV
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Transcendental numbers powered by Cantor's infinities

In this video the Mathologer gives an introduction to the notoriously hard topic of transcendental numbers that is both in depth and accessible to anybody with a bit of common sense. Find out how Georg Cantor's infinities can be used in a very simple and off the beaten track way to pinpoint a transcendental number and to show that it is really transcendental. Also find out why there are a lot more transcendental numbers than numbers that we usually think of as numbers, and this despite the fact that it is super tough to show the transcendence of any number of interest such as pi or e. Also featuring an animated introduction to countable and uncountable infinities, Joseph Liouville's ocean of zeros constant, and much more.

Here is a link to one of Georg Cantor's first papers on his theory of infinite sets. Interestingly it deals with the construction of transcendental numbers!

 

Cantor, Georg (1874), "Ueber eine Eigenschaft des Inbegriffes aller reellen algebraischen Zahlen", Journal für die Reine und Angewandte Mathematik, 77: 258–262
http://gdz.sub.uni-goettingen.de/pdfc...

Here is the link to the free course on measure theory by my friend Marty Ross who I also like to thank for his help with finetuning this video:
http://maths.org.au/index.php/2013/10...
(it's the last collection of videos at the bottom of the linked page).

Thank you also very much to Danil Dmitriev the official Mathologer translator for Russian for his subtitles.

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Interpretable Models of Antibiotic Resistance Using Machine Algorithms

A Google TechTalk, 13 Feb 2017

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Digital Discovery and Design: Toward the New Age of Materials on Demand

About Advances in Material Science

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209 Seconds That Will Make You Question Your Entire Existence

...


Via Iam Legion, CineversityTV
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Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference 2016  [29 Videos]

Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference 2016  [29 Videos] | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is a form of quantum computing which relies on the adiabatic theorem to do calculations[1] and is closely related to, and may be regarded as a subclass of, quantum annealing. First, a (potentially complicated) Hamiltonian is found whose ground state describes the solution to the problem of interest. Next, a system with a simple Hamiltonian is prepared and initialized to the ground state. Finally, the simple Hamiltonian is adiabatically evolved to the desired complicated Hamiltonian. By the adiabatic theorem, the system remains in the ground state, so at the end the state of the system describes the solution to the problem. Adiabatic Quantum Computing has been shown to be polynomially equivalent to conventional quantum computing in the circuit model.[6] The time complexity for an adiabatic algorithm is the time taken to complete the adiabatic evolution which is dependent on the gap in the energy eigenvalues (spectral gap) of the Hamiltonian. Specifically, if the system is to be kept in the ground state, the energy gap between the ground H(t) state and the first excited state of {\displaystyle H(t)} provides an upper bound on the rate at which the t Hamiltonian can be evolved at time {\displaystyle t}.[7

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Frontiers of Physics Lecture: Dr. Rainer Weiss talks about Gravity Waves and more

Dr. Rainer Weiss, emeritus professor of Physics from MIT, speaks to the University of Washington community on "Gravitational Wave Astronomy: A New Way.

 

Prof. Weiss is an American physicist, known for his contributions in gravitational physics and astrophysics. He is a professor of physics emeritus at MIT. He is best known for inventing the laser interferometric technique which is the basic operation of LIGO. Rainer Weiss was Chair of the COBE Science Working Group.[1][2][3].

 

Dr. Weiss brought two fields of fundamental physics research from birth to maturity: characterization of the cosmic background radiation,[3] and interferometric gravitational wave observation. He made pioneering measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, and then was co-founder and science advisor of the NASA COBE (microwave background) satellite.[1] In 2006, with John C. Mather, he and the COBE team received the Gruber Prize in Cosmology.[2]

 

Weiss also invented the interferometric gravitational wave detector, and co-founded the NSF LIGO (gravitational-wave detection) project. Both of these efforts couple challenges in instrument science with physics important to the understanding of the Universe.[7] In 2007, with Ronald Drever, he was awarded the Einstein Prize for this work.[8]

 

In February 2016, he was one of the four scientists presenting at the press conference for the announcement that the first direct gravitational wave observation had been made in September 2015.[9][10][11][12][a] For this achievement, in 2016 he received the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, Gruber Prize in Cosmology, Shaw Prize,[13] Kavli Prize in Astrophysics[14] and the Harvey Prize together with Kip Thorne andRonald Drever.[15]

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The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Quantum Physics in Modern Mathematics

Mathematics has proven to be "unreasonably effective" in understanding nature. The fundamental laws of physics can be captured in beautiful formulae. In this lecture, Prof. Robbert Dijkgraaf argues for the reverse effect: Nature is an important source of inspiration for mathematics, even of the purest kind. In recent years ideas from quantum field theory, elementary particles physics and string theory have completely transformed mathematics, leading to solutions of deep problems, suggesting new invariants in geometry and topology, and, perhaps most importantly, putting modern mathematical ideas in a `natural’ context.

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Coelacanths: The ancient fish that never turned extinct

The coelacanths constitute a now rare order of fish that includes two extant species in the genus Latimeria: the West Indian Ocean coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and the Indonesian coelacanth (Latimeria menadoensis). They follow the oldest known living lineage of Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish and tetrapods), which means they are more closely related to lungfish, reptiles and mammals than to the common ray-finned fishes. They are found along the coastlines of the Indian Ocean and Indonesia. Since there are only two species of coelacanth and both are threatened, it is the most endangered order of animals in the world. The West Indian Ocean coelacanth is a critically endangered species.

 

The coelacanth, which is related to lungfishes and tetrapods, was believed to have been extinct since the end of the Cretaceous period. More closely related to tetrapods than to the ray-finned fish, coelacanths were considered transitional species between fish and tetrapods. On 23 December 1938, the first Latimeria specimen was found off the east coast of South Africa, off the Chalumna River (now Tyolomnqa). Museum curator Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer discovered the fish among the catch of a local angler, Captain Hendrick Goosen. A Rhodes University ichthyologist, J. L. B. Smith, confirmed the fish's importance with a famous cable: "MOST IMPORTANT PRESERVE SKELETON AND GILLS = FISH DESCRIBED".[6][14]

 

Its discovery 66 million years after it was believed to have gone extinct makes the coelacanth the best-known example of a Lazarus taxon, an evolutionary line that seems to have disappeared from the fossil record only to reappear much later. Since 1938, Latimeria chalumnae have been found in the Comoros, Kenya,Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar, and in iSimangaliso Wetland Park, Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa.[15]

 

The second extant species, L. menadoensis, was described from Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia in 1999 by Pouyaud et al.[16] based on a specimen discovered by Mark V. Erdmann in 1998[17] and deposited at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). Only a photograph of the first specimen of this species was made at a local market by Erdmann and his wife Arnaz Mehta before it was bought by a shopper.[citation needed]

 

The coelacanth has no real commercial value apart from being coveted by museums and private collectors. As a food fish it is almost worthless, as its tissues exude oils that give the flesh a foul flavor.[18] The coelacanth's continued survival may be threatened by commercial deep-sea trawling,[19] in which coelacanths are caught as bycatch.

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Universe, Cosmic Vistas and Magnificent Views of Space

The "Journey to the Edge of the Universe" documentary film broadcast on National Geographic and Discovery Channels.

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Mathematics of Stem Cells

Cell populations are complex. Their collective functioning, turnover, and cooperation are at the basis of the life of multicellular organisms, such as humans. When this goes wrong, an unwanted evolutionary process can begin that leads to cancer. Mathematics cannot cure cancer, but it can be used to understand some of its aspects, which is an essential step in winning the battle.

Via Miguel Martín-Landrove
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2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: De-Extinction of Species

Neil deGrasse Tyson and panelists discuss de-extinction in the 2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate at the American Museum of Natural History. Biologists today have the knowledge, the tools, and the ability to influence the evolution of life on Earth. Do we have an obligation to bring back species that human activities may have rendered extinct? Does the technology exist to do so? Join Tyson and the panel for a lively debate about the merits and shortcomings of this provocative idea.

2017 Asimov Debate panelists are:

George Church
Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard University and MIT

Hank Greely
Director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, Stanford University

Gregory Kaebnick
Scholar, The Hastings Center; Editor, Hastings Center Report

Ross MacPhee
Curator, Department of Mammalogy, Division of Vertebrate Zoology; Professor, Richard Gilder Graduate School

Beth Shapiro
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz

For a full transcript of this debate, visit:
http://www.amnh.org/explore/amnh.tv/(...

2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Is the Universe a Simulation?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgSZA...

2015 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Water, Water
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSF79...

2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbmFe...

2013 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: The Existence of Nothing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OLz6...

2012 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Faster Than the Speed of Light
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qlLW...

2011 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: The Theory of Everything
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb8_3...

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Chaos - A mathematical adventure

Chaos - A mathematical adventure | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

From Jos Leys, Étienne Ghys and Aurélien Alvarez, the makers of Dimensions, comes CHAOS. It is a film about dynamical systems, the butterfly effect and chaos theory, intended for a wide audience.

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GoogleTechTalk 2017: Large-Scale Distributed Virtual World Systems

A Google TechTalk, 4/11/17, presented by Prof. Philip Levis, Stanford University

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Visualizing the Riemann zeta function and analytic continuation

This video gives a perspective on what the Riemann zeta function looks like and what it means beyond its domain of convergence.

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A Breakthrough in Packing Higher Dimensional Spheres

How do you stack hundred-dimensional oranges? Learn about recent breakthroughs in our understanding of hyperspheres in the first episode of Infinite Series, a show that tackles the mysteries and the joy of mathematics. From Logic to Calculus, from Probability to Projective Geometry, Infinite Series both entertains and challenges its viewers to take their math game to the next level.

 

Higher dimensional spheres, or hyperspheres, are counter-intuitive and almost impossible to visualize. Mathematician Kelsey Houston-Edwards explains higher dimensional spheres and how recent revelations in sphere packing have exposed truths about 8 and 24 dimensions that we don't even understand in 4 dimensions.

Sphere Packing in Higher Dimensions - Quanta Magazine
https://www.quantamagazine.org/201603...

Why You Should Care about High-Dimensional Sphere Packing - Scientific American
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...

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A Journey to Mars: What Problems Could We Encounter? (NASA, March 2017)

Journey to Mars Webinar featuring NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Scientist Doug Ming from the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX.
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On and beyond complex systems: self-organization is not enough

Lecture given by Terrence Deacon, University of California Berkeley, at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada


Via june holley
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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, April 4, 2:15 PM
Nice piece. Why not asking why self-organizaiton happens. Why, not how.
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Emmy Noether and The Fabric of Reality

Emmy Noether made one the most significant discovery of the 20th century. As female Jewish intellectual in Nazi Germany, Emmy's had a special approach to life. Noether's Theorem ties the laws of nature -- from Newton's laws to thermodynamics to charge conservation -- directly to the geometry of space and time, the very fabric of reality. It is the basis for the standard model of particle physics, quantum electrodynamics, and grand unified theories including supersymmetry and superstrings. As usual in physics, it gets really interesting when the theorem is violated: answers to the origin of mass and the matter-antimatter asymmetry problems emerge when Noether's theorem is violated. Two things should bother you about Noether's Theorem: (1) how come so few people have heard of Emmy Noether? and (2) why isn't her theorem well known to lovers of science? With the help of a bunch of straw, Ransom Stephens solves these problems on June 16, 2010.

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Through the looking glass: The Weak Nuclear Force

Of all of the known subatomic forces, the weak force is in many ways unique. One particularly interesting facet is that the force differentiates between a particle that is rotating clockwise and counterclockwise. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln describes this unusual property and introduces some of the historical figures who played a role in working it all out.

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Quantum Fields: The Real Building Blocks of the Universe - with David Tong

According to our best theories of physics, the fundamental building blocks of matter are not particles, but continuous fluid-like substances known as 'quantum fields'. David Tong explains what we know about these fields, and how they fit into our understanding of the Universe.

 

Watch the Q&A here: https://youtu.be/QUMeKDlgKmk

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Nima Arkani-Hamed: About The Future of Fundamental Physics [7 hr Lecture]

Learn about where physics is heading in the 21st century.

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Topological Phase Transitions: The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics - Prof Michael Fuhrer

The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2016 was awarded to David J. Thouless, F. Duncan M. Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter".

 

In this colloquium Prof Michael Fuhrer will try to explain the concept of a "topological phase of matter" and the impact of this idea on the study of electronic phases in solid-state systems.

 

Before the work of Thouless, Haldane and Kosterlitz, phase transitions were understood within Landau's framework of an order parameter arising from the breaking of a symmetry; for example the paramagnet to ferromagnet transation breaks rotational symmetry and establishes an order parameter (the magnetization). Thouless, Haldane and Kosterlitz (working independently or together in several different contexts) demonstrated that phase transitions may be accompanied by a change in the topology of a system, without a change in symmetry. This framework allowed understanding of finite-temperature transitions in low-dimensional superfluids (the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition), spin chains (Haldane), the quantum Hall effect (Thouless), and the possibility of quantum Hall effects without magnetic fields (Haldane). This last work was led ultimately to the discovery of a variety of topological phases of real solid-state materials which may form the basis of new types of electronic devices - which the FLEET Centre of Excellence is working to make a reality.

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