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The strange new world of Nanoscience – Narrated by Stephen Fry

The strange new world of Nanoscience – Narrated by Stephen Fry | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Where and what is nano? How will it shape our future? Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and manipulation of materials at the nanoscale, where properties differ significantly from those at a larger scale. The strange world of nanoscience – it can take you into atoms and beyond the stars.

 

Winner Best short film at the Scinema Science film festival 2010.

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Entanglement and Complexity: Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

Professor Leonard Susskind describes how gravity and quantum information theory have come together to create a new way of thinking about physical systems
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A New View on Gravity and the Dark Side of the Cosmos

In his public lecture at Perimeter on October 4, 2017, Dr. Erik Verlinde explored the core ideas behind this research into emergent gravity, and examine the implications of this potential revolution in our understanding of the universe.

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Mass Extinctions: A Brief History Of Life's Worst Moments on Earth

Life on Earth has experienced at least five major events we call “mass extinctions,” during which a huge number of species have gone extinct in a short period of time. Paleontologist Phoebe Cohen explores how scientists decide which extinctions get to be considered “mass,” the ways in which these events have reshaped life as we know it, and how a deep understanding of past extinctions can help us see the future.

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Secrets of the Fibonacci Sequence and the Phi Vortex Based Mathematics Torus Array

Video Source - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxuU8jYkA1k Music by Simon Mathewson.

 

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THE NEXT STEP IN THE SEARCH FOR HABITABLE PLANETS - NASA SCIENCE LECTURE

The Kepler Space Telescope was incredibly successful in its mission to search out and identify planets around other stars. But what comes next? A researcher from NASA Ames shares his work to develop new direct imaging technologies to study exoplanets in greater detail and discover habitable worlds outside of our solar system.
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Impossible Crystals — quasi-crystals with five-fold symmetry previously believed impossible

Physicist Paul Steinhardt discusses the creation of "Impossible crystals" – quasi-crystals with five-fold symmetry previously believed impossible.

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A Time-Lapse Map of Every Nuclear Explosion Since 1945 - by Isao Hashimoto

The Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project's "Trinity" test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan's nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea's two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).


Via Sakis Koukouvis, Jimi Paradise, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The End of Space and Time? (by Prof. Robbert Dijkgraaf)

Robbert Dijkgraaf's focus is on string theory, quantum gravity, and the interface between mathematics and particle physics, bringing them together in an accessible way, looking at sciences, the arts and other matters.

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Gravity and Quantum Mechanics - The Quest for Unification

Quantum mechanics and relativity tell us that when we look at the very small, the very fast, or the very massive.

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The Extreme World of Ultra Intense Lasers

The most powerful lasers in the world can be used to make some of the most extreme conditions possible on earth, and are revolutionizing science.

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SETI Talks Series [196 videos]: How can we find intelligent life in the universe?

SETI Talks Series [196 videos]: How can we find intelligent life in the universe? | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7B4FE6C62DCB34E1

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Quantum Origins of Space and Time

Renate Loll from Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics delivers a lecture on Searching for the Quantum Origins of Space and Time.

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MIT Forum: Molecular Manufacturing in 2017

Can industry as we know it be made obsolete? If so, then the problems of the 21st century, including climate disruption, are not as they seem. Dr. Andrew Ban gives his valuable insight.

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Strange Planetary Vistas from Kepler - Harvard Lecture

The study of extrasolar planets has recently entered its heyday with the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler has found that planetary systems are very common in our galaxy. Along the way, we've been surprised by the diversity of planetary systems, many of which bear little resemblance to our own solar system. Josh Carter presents these most alien of alien worlds, including planets orbiting two suns and a planetary system with two very different planets very close to one another.

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Electron Superhighway: A Quantum Leap for Computing

For the past 60 years, progress in information technology has been governed by Moore's law, which states that the number of transistors on a semiconductor chip doubles every 18 months. However, this remarkable trend is drawing to a close, mostly because the electrons that carry current in chips move like cars driving through a crowded marketplace, swerving around obstacles and dissipating too much of their energy as heat. The recent discovery of a new state of matter "the topological insulator" may lead to a new paradigm of information processing, in which electrons moving in opposing directions are separated into well-ordered lanes, like automobiles on a highway. This talk will explain the basic principles behind this amazing discovery.

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Towards a Semantic Language of Mathematics

This film discusses the techniques, and outlines the vision of the future computerization of pure mathematics through interviews and talk segments from renowned mathematicians, meta-mathematicians, computational mathematicians, and theorem provers.

The interviews and talks were conducted at the Sloan Foundation sponsored "Semantic Representation of Mathematical Knowledge Workshop", held at the Fields Institute (Toronto) in February 2016.

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Leonard Susskind: Mysteries of DarkEnergy

Dark energy has a kind of "anti-gravity" effect, causing everything to repel from everything else. This force is inevitable in physicists' equations, but it is many, many, many orders of magnitude smaller than can be explained by standard theories.

 

Enter string theory, which Leonard Susskind and Yoichiro Nambu proposed in 1969. While we observe three dimensions of space and one of time, string theory posits 10 dimensions of space and one of time. The extra dimensions are balled up, or compactified, into dimensions too small to detect but whose structures are important to the laws of physics.

 

Describing compactified dimensions is very complex— to say the least. "We have examples of systems in nature which have thousands of degrees of freedom," Susskind says, citing a molecule made up out of a thousand atoms. "How many energy levels, how many quantum states, does such a molecule have? The answer can be as high as 10^1000 [ten raised to the power of one thousand]— and there are huge, huge numbers of possibilities for the ways the atoms organize themselves. In the same way, there are huge numbers of possibilities for the way that these—they're called compactification manifolds— organize themselves. And because there are so many ways, there are many, many energy levels. For the molecule, there are many, many possible values for the energy, 10^500 [ten raised to the power of five hundred] possible values of the vacuum energy."

 

Dark energy poses great challenges and opportunities in physics and cosmology and may hold the key to the long-sought unification of quantum mechanics and gravity, Susskind says.

"We're largely just beginning to get an overall view of how string theory and [the] incredibly many possibilities that appear to be inherent in it, are changing our view of what's natural, what's possible, what's probable."

 

Do 'pocket universes' exist?

In recent years, some physicists have suggested that rather than having one universe with one set of physical laws, string theory may lay the foundation for the possibility of the existence of innumerable ``pocket universes,`` each with its own landscape of physical laws.

 

"The word 'universe' is obviously not intended to have a plural, but science has evolved in such a way that we need a plural noun for something similar to what we ordinarily call our universe," Susskind explains. "Alan Guth coined the name 'pocket universe,' meaning a pocket of space, a region of space, over which the environment is uniform, the laws of nature are uniform, the constants of nature are uniform, and that these pockets of space are more or less identifiable with the things that we used to call the Universe, with a capital U. So we now need a plural for the concept if we believe that space is filled like a crazy quilt of environments with different properties and different laws of physics."

 

Today, string theory has become a serious controversy even within the physics mainstream. The number of possible energy states—10500 [ten raised to the power of five hundred]—inherent in string theory is "totally unexpected," Susskind says. "There was constantly a sense that there would only be one, or some very small number, of legitimate solutions of the theory. Ed Witten [a physicist famed for his mathematical prowess] worked very hard to show that there was only a very small number, and he failed completely."

 

The dust isn't likely to settle soon. Says Susskind: "More and more as time goes on, the opponents of the idea admit that they are simply in a state of depression and desperation. More and more people are starting to think about this possibility. But it's been a major sea change in the attitudes of theoretical physicists. … It means we have a mathematical framework to think about it. We have a basic set of precise concepts to think about it, and it means that in time we will know the truth."

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Juan Maldacena: The Symmetry and Simplicity of the Laws of Nature

Juan Maldacena’s work focuses on quantum gravity, string theory, and quantum field theory. He has proposed a relationship between quantum gravity and quantum field theories that elucidates various aspects of both theories. He is studying this relationship further in order to understand the deep connection between black holes and quantum field theories, and he is also exploring the connection between string theory and cosmology.

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Seth Lloyd on Quantum Life

Big Ideas presents Seth Lloyd of the Massachusetts Institute for Technology on Quantum Life, how organisms have evolved to make use of quantum effects.
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Suzanne Gildert on Kindred AI: Non-Biological Sentiences are on the Horizon

Dr. Suzanne Gildert is a founder and CTO of Kindred AI – a company pursuing the modest vision of “building machines with human-like intelligence.” Her startup just came out of stealth mode and I am both proud and humbled to say that this is the first ever long-form interview that Suzanne has done. Kindred AI has raised 15 million dollars from notable investors and currently employs 35 experts in their offices in Toronto, Vancouver and San Francisco. Even better, Suzanne is a long term Singularity.FM podcast fan, total tech geek, Gothic artist, PhD in experimental physics and former D-Wave Quantum Computer maker. Right now I honestly can’t think of a more interesting person to have a conversation with.

During our 100 min discussion with Suzanne Gildert we cover a wide variety of interesting topics such as: why she sees herself as a scientist, engineer, maker and artist; the interplay between science and art; the influence of Gothic art in general and the images of angels and demons in particular; her journey from experimental physics into quantum computers and embodied AI; building tools to answer questions versus intelligent machines that can ask questions; the importance of massively transformative purpose; the convergence of robotics, the ability to move large data across networks and advanced machine learning algorithms; her dream of a world with non-biological intelligences living among us; whether she fears AI or not; the importance of embodying intelligence and providing human-like sensory perception; whether consciousness is classical Newtonian emergent properly or a Quantum phenomenon; ethics and robot rights; self-preservation and Asimov’s Laws of Robotics; giving robots goals and values; the magnifying mirror of technology and the importance of asking questions…

 

Here are the 10 D-wave technology presentation videos - lectures given by Dr. Suzanne Gildert in 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV2syNxDfe0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpvhRcIjGGU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKLGlInKzk8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTzLO2zQV2c
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rw1MmljlxWk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdFEOsAdBeE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxzietDpTrI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9uqO7q-v1g
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpH8iOS8GwM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBNOAdfLX2I

or all together in a playlist:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV2syNxDfe0&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PLBE82A43D0A71BAB7

and here are her talks on quantum computing - is the end near for silicon chips?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyAndXYo9cA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3SvZ7KCZdI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05FiZEjYB2A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8essA5aUNgE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLk3vxi3_DY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEv4ccFutcI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXWWx57Iv-8

and her adiabatic QC talks plus her QC and AI talks in a playlist:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLY0lBwUHWw&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PLA4945FDEFBD5D5ED

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A WISE search for large extraterrestrial civilizations: a complementary approach to traditional SETI

Speaker: Jason T. Wright, Penn. State University Slides: http://www2.astro.psu.edu/%7Ejtwright/Dyson/SETI.pdf 

 

If alien civilizations exist throughout the universe, many have had billions of years to develop technology, expand their population and energy supplies, and travel across their galaxies. Kardashev classified hypothetical advanced civilizations by the magnitude of their power supply, with Type II civilizations harnessing most of the energy output of their host star, and Type III civilizations using most of the power in their galaxy. As Dyson pointed out in 1960, the waste heat emitted by a such civilizations would easily overwhelm that of their host star or galaxy, distinguishing them from "normal" astrophysical sources. This approach to SETI makes few assumptions about the behavior of alien civilizations, primarily: conservation of energy, the laws of thermodynamics, and that given the age of the Universe aliens have had time to develop very large energy supplies.

The WISE all-sky mid-infrared survey has dramatically improved our ability to detect such civilizations and to distinguish them from "natural" astrophysical sources. I will discuss our team's efforts to identify candidate Type II civilizations in the Milky Way and Type III civilizations throughout the low-redshift universe. Because the scope and assumptions of this approach are complementary to those of telecommunication SETI, a null result has the potential to rule out broad classes of proposed resolutions to the Fermi-Hart Paradox, particularly those that invoke organization of advanced alien species across the Milky Way.

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Professor Sir Roger Penrose: Can we ever see signals before the Big Bang?

In 2005, Dr. Penrose proposed the unconventional scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC). This takes what is currently regarded as the entire history of the universe, from its Big-Bang origin (with no inflationary phase) to its final exponential expansion, to be but one aeon of a continual succession of such aeons. The big bang of each is taken to be an infinitely scaled down continuation of the exponentially expanding remote future of the previous one. A positive cosmological constant (dark energy) and some primordial scalar material (dark matter) are both essential to CCC's consistency. Supermassive black-hole encounters in the aeon previous to ours would have observational implications for CCC, detectable within the cosmic microwave background. Recent evidence of such signals in both the WMAP and Planck satellite data will be presented.

About the Speaker:
Sir Roger Penrose OM FRS, is a mathematical physicist, mathematician and philosopher of science. He is the Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford, as well as an Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College. Penrose is known for his influential work in mathematical physics, in particular for his contributions to general relativity and cosmology. He has received a number of prizes and awards, including the 1988 Wolf Prize for physics, shared with Stephen Hawking for their contribution to our understanding of the universe. Popular science works include The Emperor's New Mind, Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness, and The Road To Reality.

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Life, the Universe, and Nothing: A Cosmic Mystery Story "

Lawrence Krauss' work has been primarily in theoretical (as opposed to experimental) physics, and he has published research on a great variety of topics within that field. Krauss is a renowned cosmologist and popularizer of modern science and director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. Hailed by Scientific American as a rare public intellectual, he is the author of more than three hundred scientific publications and 8 books, including the bestselling The Physics of Star Trek, and the recipient of numerous international awards for his research and writing.

 

Dr. Krauss is an internationally known theoretical physicist with wide research interests, including the interface between elementary particle physics and cosmology, where his studies include the early universe, the nature of dark matter, general relativity and neutrino astrophysics. His soon to be published book, A Universe From Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing is already garnering strong reviews. Exploring the scientific advances that provide insight into how the universe formed, Krauss ultimately tackles the age-old assumption that something cannot arise from nothing by arguing that not only can something arise from nothing, but something will always arise from nothing.

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Weirdest planets discovered by NASA's Kepler satellite so far

Take a look at some of the strangest exoplanets discovered so far.

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