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Video Of Rarely Seen Pelagic Argonaut Octopus Out Of Its Shell

Argonaut is a type of octopus most commonly found in tropical and subtropical seas. Its presence in temperate waters of Southern California indicate that warm water currents from the South are prevalent. Argonauts are pelagic (usually found far offshore in the open ocean) and demonstrate a dramatic sexual dimorphism (male is about one inch long and females up to 18 inches). The male argonaute has one of it's eight arms (the third) highly modified to carry sperm to the female. The modified arm of the male is called a hectocotylus and during mating this arm breaks off and crawls into the female to remain there until the female is ready to fertilize her eggs. When first discovered in the early 1800s the hectocotylus arm was thought to be a parasitic worm and was given the species name of Hectocotylus (therefore the origin of the term hecotocotylus arm of cephalopods).

 

The female argonaut makes a thin, laterally compressed calcareous shell with one chamber that is used as a brood pouch for eggs. The first of the eight arms of the female bears a wide sail-like lobe that is used to secrete and form the shell. The shell looks like an extinct ammonid shell or resembles shells from the extant cephalopod group called nautiluses. Thus, argonautes are commonly referred to as "paper nautiluses", however, they are octopuses and not closely related to nautiluses. Due to their beauty and delicate nature, argonaute shells are highly prized by collectors

 

Argonauts eat plankton like krill, shrimp and pelagic snails. A recent paper describes an argonaut positioned on the top of a jellyfish and eating away the bell to be able to send arms down through the jelly to remove plantonic food in the jelly's stomach.

 

Argonauts are eaten by tuna, billfish and blue sharks

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Mathematics of Stem Cells

Cell populations are complex. Their collective functioning, turnover, and cooperation are at the basis of the life of multicellular organisms, such as humans. When this goes wrong, an unwanted evolutionary process can begin that leads to cancer. Mathematics cannot cure cancer, but it can be used to understand some of its aspects, which is an essential step in winning the battle.

Via Miguel Martín-Landrove
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Einstein Field Equations - for beginners!

Einstein's Field Equations for General Relativity - including the Metric Tensor, Christoffel symbols, Ricci Cuvature Tensor, Curvature Scalar, Stress Energy Momentum Tensor and Cosmological Constant.

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John Conway on "The remarkable history of Pascal's hexagrammum mysticum"

If six unordered points are given on a conic section, they can be connected into a hexagon in 60 different ways, resulting in 60 different instances of Pascal's theorem and 60 different Pascal lines. This configuration of 60 lines is called the Hexagrammum Mysticum.[3]

 

As Thomas Kirkman proved in 1849, these 60 lines can be associated with 60 points in such a way that each point is on three lines and each line contains three points. The 60 points formed in this way are now known as the Kirkman points.[4] The Pascal lines also pass, three at a time, through 20 Steiner points. There are 20 Cayley lines which consist of a Steiner point and three Kirkman points. The Steiner points also lie, four at a time, on 15 Plücker lines. Furthermore, the 20 Cayley lines pass four at a time through 15 points known as the Salmon points.[5]

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Surreal Numbers - How playing games led to more numbers than anybody ever thought of

IT’S ALL ABOUT MATH! An ongoing series hosted by The Department of Mathematics of the University of Toronto How playing games led to more numbers than anyone ever expected.

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Highlights from the O'Reilly AI Conference in New York 2016

Highlights from the O'Reilly AI Conference in New York 2016 | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Watch highlights covering artificial intelligence, machine learning, intelligence engineering, and more. From the O'Reilly AI Conference in New York 2016.
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Quantum Computing: Transforming the Digital Age

Quantum computing promises to revolutionize how we compute and change the way we use technology in our daily lives.

 

Dr. Krysta Svore, Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, reveals some of the mysteries of this disruptive computational paradigm and showcase real-world applications of quantum devices.

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Target capture of DNA from FFPE samples — recommendations for generating robust sequencing data

Cancer therapies that target specific pathways can be more effective than established, nonspecific chemotherapy and radiation treatments, and may prevent side effects on healthy tissues. Such targeted therapies can only be applied after underlying gene mutations have been identified. However, detecting low frequency variants from clinically relevant samples poses significant challenges. Specimens are routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) for histology, which can decrease the efficiency of NGS library preparation. In this presentation, we discuss approaches for extraction of DNA from FFPE samples, and recommend quality control assays to guide parameter selection for library construction and sequencing depth.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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SETI Talks 2016: When Will We Find Life Beyond Earth? (46 Videos)

196 additional little older talks

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On the Shores of Titan's Farthest Sea - Michael Carroll (SETI TALKS)

In this talk, Author/artist Michael Carroll will explore the bizarre methane-filled seas and soaring dunes of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Recent advances in our understanding of this planet-sized moon provide enough information for authors to paint a realistic picture of this truly alien world. Following his presentation, he will be signing his new science fiction adventure/mystery book, "On the Shores of Titan's Farthest Sea".

 

"Carroll's descriptions of oily seas and methane monsoons put you in that alien world, front and center…I can imagine future astronauts doing exactly the kinds of things Mike describes. I wish I could be one of them." Alan Bean, Apollo 12 astronaut.

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Detecting Exoplanetary Systems with Microlensing (SETI Talks)

Measurements of the demographics of exoplanets over a range of planet and host star properties provide fundamental empirical constraints on theories of planet formation and evolution. Because of its unique sensitivity to low-mass, long-period, and free-floating planets, microlensing is an essential complement to our arsenal of planet detection methods.

Dr. Gaudi will review the microlensing method, and discuss results to date from ground-based microlensing surveys. Also, Dr. Gaudi will motivate a space-based microlensing survey with WFIRST-AFTA, which when combined with the results from Kepler, will yield a nearly complete picture of the demographics of planetary systems throughout the Galaxy.

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Exoplanets spectroscopy with diffraction primary objective telescopes (SETI Talks)

When diffraction is employed as the primary collector modality of a telescope instead of reflection or refraction, a new set of performance capabilities emerges. A diffraction-based telescope forms a spectrogram first and an image as secondary data. The results are startling. In multiple object capability, the diffraction telescope on earth can capture 2 million spectra to R bigger than 100,000 in a single night, better for a census of exoplanets by radial velocity than any prior art. In a space telescope in a direct observation mode, this type diffraction primary objective could reveal spectral analyses of individual exoplanets.

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SETI and the Computational Universe - Stephen Wolfram (SETI Talks)

Dr Stephen Wolfram, founder & CEO of Wolfram Research, and creator of Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha and the Wolfram Language will come to the SETI Institute to discuss his latest thinking about the relation between searching for complex behavior in the computational universe of simple programs, using this in creating AI, and searching for intelligence elsewhere in our physical universe.

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Let's build a quantum computer!
Understanding the architecture of a quantum processor

Andreas Dewes explains why quantum computing is interesting, how it works and what you actually need to build a working quantum computer. He uses the superconducting two-qubit quantum processor which he built during his PhD thesis as an example to explain its basic building blocks. He shows how this processor can be used to achieve so-called quantum speed-up for a search algorithm that can be run on it. Finally, he gives a short overview of the current state of superconducting quantum computing and Google's recently announced effort to build a working quantum computer in cooperation with one of the leading research groups in this field.

 

Google recently announced that it is partnering up with John Martinis - one of the leading researchers on superconducting quantum computing - to build a working quantum processor. This announcement has sparked a lot of renewed interest in a topic that was mainly of academic interest before. So, if Google thinks it's worth the hassle to build quantum computers then there surely must be something about them after all?

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Cassini and Huygens  - 22 NASA videos of a foreign world

On January 14, 2005, ESA’s Huygens probe made its descent to the surface of Saturn’s hazy moon, Titan. Carried to Saturn by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, Huygens made the most distant landing ever on another world, and the only landing on a body in the outer solar system. This video uses actual images taken by the probe during its two-and-a-half hour fall under its parachutes. Huygens was a signature achievement of the international Cassini-Huygens mission, which will conclude on September 15, 2017, when Cassini plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere.

 

A  two minute video shows images taken by ESA’s Huygens probe when it made its descent to the surface of Titan. After a two-and-a-half-hour descent, the metallic, saucer-shaped spacecraft came to rest with a thud on a dark floodplain covered in cobbles of water ice, in temperatures hundreds of degrees below freezing. The alien probe worked frantically to collect and transmit images and data about its environs — in mere minutes its mothership would drop below the local horizon, cutting off its link to the home world and silencing its voice forever.

 

Although it may seem the stuff of science fiction, this scene played out 12 years ago on the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The “aliens” who built the probe were us. This was the triumphant landing of ESA’s Huygens probe.

 

Huygens, a project of the European Space Agency, traveled to Titan as the companion to NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, and then separated from its mothership on Dec. 24, 2004, for a 20-day coast toward its destiny at Titan.

 

The probe sampled Titan’s dense, hazy atmosphere as it slowly rotated beneath its parachutes, analyzing the complex organic chemistry and measuring winds. It also took hundreds of images during the descent, revealing bright, rugged highlands that were crosscut by dark drainage channels and steep ravines. The area where the probe touched down was a dark, granular surface, which resembled a dry lakebed.

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Imaginary Numbers, Functions of Complex Variables: 3D animations.

Visualization explaining imaginary numbers and functions of complex variables. Includes exponentials (Euler’s Formula) and the sine and cosine of complex numbers.

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A Tribute to Euler - presented by William Dunham, Harvard University

A Tribute to Euler William Dunham Truman Koehler Professor of Mathematics, Muhlenberg College Tuesday, October 14, 2008, at 6:00 PM Harvard University

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Surprises in Mathematics

Featuring Dr. Stan Wagon, Professor of Mathematics - Macalester College. There is no better way to get someone's attention than with an assertion that just seems obviously wrong. Math is full of such things. The talk presents several surprising, even shocking, things from elementary mathematics, such as: A square wheel that rolls perfectly smoothly. A device that uses a normal rotating crankshaft to drill perfect square holes. An application of a non-circular wheel to sewage disposal. A shocking cake puzzle. Surprising new formulas for π. Benford's mysterious law of first digits. The Banach-Tarski Paradox, with constructible pieces.

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Full Programs from the World Science Festival Archive

Full Programs from the World Science Festival Archive | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows everyone -- experts and enthusiasts alike -- to engage with scientific discoveries in unique and thrilling ways. Through theatrical works, interactive exhibits, intimate discussions, and major outdoor experiences, the Festival takes science out of the laboratory and into the streets, museums, galleries, and premier performing arts venues around the world.

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The Meaning of Ramanujan and His Lost Notebook

George E. Andrews Evan Pugh Professor of Mathematics, The Pennsylvania State University George Andrews will describe the brief life of Srinivasa Ramanujan and his influence on mathematics with his notebooks.

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Burkard Polster introduces the Klein bottle, Torus and Klein Quadric Rubik's Cubes

In this video Burkard Polster tells you about Klein bottle Rubik’s cubes, Torus Rubik's Cubes and Klein Quadric Rubik's cubes as an introduction to a whole new universe of twisty puzzles.

Get your own Klein bottle Rubik’s cube, as well as more than 800 other topological twisty puzzles by downloading the free incredibly powerful Rubik’s cube simulator MagicTile by Roice Nelson: http://roice3.org/magictile

Be one of the select few to get your name recorded in our limited edition Mathologer "Klein bottle Rubik Cube Hall of Fame" by solving the tricky puzzle and following this link: http://roice3.org/magictile/mathologer

To get some help with this challenge check out the second part of this video on Mathologer 2 in which I talk about the MagicTile interface, show you how to design and record algorithms as macro moves, as well as talk you through a complete solution of one of the easy Harlequin edge-turning puzzles (featuring the all-time simplest three-piece cycle algorithm as well as some cute parity problems): https://youtu.be/iOla7WPfCvA

Also check out the following videos for more background information:  "A simple trick to design your own solutions to Rubik’s cubes": https://youtu.be/-NL76uQOpI0 (for an introduction to designing your own algorithms for solving twisty puzzles).

 

A mirror paradox, Klein bottles and Rubik's cubes: https://youtu.be/4XN0V4xHaoQ (An introduction to what Klein bottles are all about and a bit of fun with putting Rubik’s cubes INTO Klein bottles.)

 

Cracking the 4D Rubik's Cube with simple 3D tricks: https://youtu.be/yhPH1369OWc

(Your next challenge after the the Klein Bottle Rubik's cube. Another hall of fame awaits.)
Klein Quadric II: https://youtu.be/6SZ8ONJlw7I
An animation by Jos Leys that shows how the Klein Quadric gets glued together from the patch of 24 regular 7-gons in the hyperbolic plane.

Enjoy!

Burkard

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SciPy 2016: Scientific Computing with Python Conference (92 Videos)

Project Jupyter provides building blocks for interactive and exploratory computing. These building blocks make science and data science reproducible across over 40 programming language (Python, Julia, R, etc.). Central to the project is the Jupyter Notebook, a web-based interactive computing platform that allows users to author data- and code-driven narratives - computational narratives - that combine live code, equations, narrative text, visualizations, interactive dashboards and other media.

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Viruses and Bacteria Video Collection

Viruses and Bacteria Video Collection | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Viruses are by far the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, comprising approximately 94% of the nucleic-acid-containing particles. However, because of their small size they comprise only approximately 5% of the biomass. By contrast, even though prokaryotes represent less than 10% of the nucleic-acid-containing particles they represent more than 90% of the biomass.

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Powers of Ten™ (1977)

Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell. POWERS OF TEN © 1977 EAMES OFFICE LLC (Available at www.eamesoffice.com)
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Self-Replicating Robots and Galactic Domination

To check out any of the lectures available from Great Courses Plus go to http://ow.ly/dweH302dILJ

We’ll soon be capable of building self-replicating robots. This will not only change humanity’s future but reshape the galaxy as we know it. Comment on Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/pbsspacetime

Previous Episode - Is there a 5th Fundamental Force
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Muvwc...

Should we Build a Dyson Sphere?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jW55c...

Self-assembling robots are referred to as von Neumann machines after the man responsible for originally proposing them, John von Neumann. Since then, the potential of these machines and their ability to proliferate throughout known space has made galactic colonization seem not only possible but perhaps inevitable.

References:
von Neumann, John The Theory of Self-reproducing Automata, Urbana, IL: Univ. of Illinois Press. ed. A. Burks, 1966

Robert A. Freitas Jr., Ralph C. Merkle, Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines, Landes Bioscience, Georgetown, TX, 2004;
http://www.MolecularAssembler.com/KSR...

Robo3D R1 printing an upgrade for itself
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e_Bf...

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