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Strange Planetary Vistas from Kepler - Harvard Lecture

The study of extrasolar planets has recently entered its heyday with the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler has found that planetary systems are very common in our galaxy. Along the way, we've been surprised by the diversity of planetary systems, many of which bear little resemblance to our own solar system. Josh Carter presents these most alien of alien worlds, including planets orbiting two suns and a planetary system with two very different planets very close to one another.

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EMBO 2012 - International workshop on Evolution in the Time of Genomics

EMBO 2012 - International workshop on Evolution in the Time of Genomics | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Molecular evolution was born fifty years before the planned Conference, with a seminal paper by Zuckerkandl and Pauling (1962) which demonstrated that aminoacid changes in the globins followed a molecular clock and could provide information on the phylogeny of vertebrates and on the timing of their appearance on earth.

Principal themes and objectives of the event From changes in aminoacids to changes in nucleotides, the molecular level has provided an essential input into evolutionary investigations for the past decades. More recently, the molecular level has moved from the genes to the genome, so far mainly in the case of vertebrates (in which the coding sequences only represent about 2% of the total). The availability of full genome sequences has provided new possibilities for investigators in the field and major problems can now be tackled in a very precise way using bioinformatic tools. Indeed, an example of this approach has been the recent solution (Bernardi, 2007)of a twenty-year-old debate, that between neutralists and selectionists.
One of the major current debates concerns adaptive vs. non-adaptive evolution. Random events in evolution were originally raised as a fundamental problem by Jacques Monod in his famous book "Chance and necessity". The problem has now been shifted to the genome level. A preliminary discussion took place in October 2010 in a Meeting "Chance and Necessity in Evolution" (Ravello, Italy; papers are in press in a special issue of Genome Biology and Evolution). The proposed meeting should go deeper into such a basic issue. While this will be one of the main subject of the meeting in which different views will confront each other (with Bernardi, Jarosz, Koonin, Ohta, Ptashne), other basic topics in Genome Evolution will be addressed. Werner Arber, Hamilton Smith (two Nobel Laureates) and George Church will discuss in depth the results obtained so far "directing" evolution in microbial systems, their interpretation and even the ethical issues raised. Davidson, Gehring and Gojobori will deal with the evolution of developmental processes; Martin, Saccone and Wallace with the evolution of mitochondrial genomes; Okada and Shapiro with the impact of mobile elements on genome evolution; Jeffreys and Saitou with recombination and biased gene conversion; Bustamante, Felsenfeld, Hartl and Haussler with regulation of gene expression and copy number variation in the human genome. Last but not least, Emile Zuckerkandl will recollect the beginning of Molecular Evolution.


7 — 9 May 2012 | Venice, Italy
Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti
Palazzo Franchetti

 

http://events.embo.org/12-evolution/

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The Universe As A Hologram (by Leonard Susskind, Stanford)

Leonard Susskind of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics discusses the indestructability of information and the nature of black holes in a lecture ...
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Michio Kaku: What's the Fate of the Universe? It's in the Dark Matter

Why should you bother to wake up tomorrow knowing that we're all going to die billions and billions of years from now when the universe turns to absolute zero, when the stars blink out, when we have nothing but neutron stars and black holes? Dr. Kaku says that billions of years from now we may be able to move to a different universe.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Video Archive Of The Singularity University

Video Archive Of The Singularity University | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

"The Singularity University aims to assemble, educate and inspire a cadre of leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies and apply, focus and guide these tools to address humanity's grand challenges."


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95 Video Lectures on Nanoelectronic Modeling

The goal of this series of lectures is to explain the critical concepts in the understanding of the state-of-the-art modeling of nanoelectronic devices such as resonant tunneling diodes, quantum wells, quantum dots, nanowires, and ultra-scaled transistors. Three fundamental concepts critical to the understanding of nanoelectronic devices will be explored: 1) open systems vs. closed systems, 2) non-equilibrium systems vs. close-to-equilibrium systems, and 3) atomistic material representation vs. continuum matter representation.

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[VIDEO] Juan Enriquez: Will our kids be a different species? (TEDTalks)

Throughout human evolution, multiple versions of humans co-existed. Could we be mid-upgrade now? At TEDxSummit, Juan Enriquez sweeps across time and space to bring us to the present moment -- and shows how technology is revealing evidence that suggests rapid evolution may be under way.


Via Sue Tamani, Sakis Koukouvis, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, July 2, 2012 2:39 AM
Thanks. Great video
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Scientific Animations Structural Biology Video Channel: ATP synthase structure and mechanism

Scientific Animations Structural Biology Video Channel: ATP synthase structure and mechanism | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
An ATP synthase is a general term for an enzyme that can synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate by utilizing some form of energy.
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1 million frames per second slow motion video of bullet impacts (by Werner Mehl)

Slow Motion video of bullet impacts made by Werner Mehl from Kurzzeit. These are by far the best slow motion bullet impacts available anywhere. Watch for the hollow point rounds in the ballistics gel.

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Carl Sagan's Cosmos Series

Cosmos: A Personal Voyage is a thirteen-part television series written by Carl Sagan, Ann Druyan, and Steven Soter, with Sagan as presenter. It was executive-produced by Adrian Malone, produced by David Kennard, Geoffrey Haines-Stiles and Gregory Andorfer, and directed by the producers, David Oyster, Richard Wells, Tom Weidlinger, and others. It covered a wide range of scientific subjects, including the origin of life and a perspective of our place in the universe. The series was first broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service in 1980 and was the most widely watched series in the history of American public television until The Civil War (1990). As of 2009, it was still the most widely watched PBS series in the world. It won an Emmy and a Peabody Award and has since been broadcast in more than 60 countries and seen by over 500 million people.

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Personalized Medicine World Conference 2012 - 25 full-length VIDEOS

Personalized Medicine World Conference 2012 - 25 full-length VIDEOS | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Plenary speaker videos from the Personalized Medicine World Conference (PMWC)

 

Register for the next PMWC 2013:

 http://attendpmwc2013.eventbrite.com

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iBioSeminars - Bringing the World's Best Biology Classes to YOU

iBioSeminars - Bringing the World's Best Biology Classes to YOU | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Free biology talks by the world's leading scientists. Our mission is to produce a library of outstanding science lectures. We will add 15-20 seminars per year in a wide-range of biology topics. Access, through web streaming or download, is completely free-of-charge. Also check out our iBioMagazine channel, where you can watch ~10 minute talks about the human-side of science.
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GenomeTV - Full featured lectures and meeting videos about Genomics and Genome Annotation

GenomeTV - Full featured lectures and meeting videos about Genomics and Genome Annotation | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

The Genomics in Medicine Lecture Series is sponsored by NHGRI, in collaboration with Suburban Hospital and Johns Hopkins. Each lecture takes place at Suburban Hospital's lower level auditorium at 8600 Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda, Md. All are welcome to the hour-long lectures, which begin at 8 a.m. on the first Friday of the month, from December 2011 through June 2012.

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What We Still Don't Know: "Are We Real?" A mind-boggling journey to post-human life

Series from Channel 4 featuring Sir Martin Rees.

 

There is a fundamental chasm in our understanding of ourselves, the universe, and everything. To solve this, Sir Martin takes us on a mind-boggling journey through multiple universes to post-biological life. On the way we learn of the disturbing possibility that we could be the product of someone elses experiment.

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Marcus Chown talks about the top 10 strangest things about the Universe

Marcus Chown of New Scientist Magazine on his Top 10 Bonkers Things About the Universe.

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Cancers Genomes and their Implications for Curing Cancer (by Bert Vogelstein, JHU)

The full lecture title is "Cancers - Their Genomes, Microenvironments, and Susceptibility to Bacteria-based Therapies" by Bert Vogelstein. The Johns Hopkins Center for Biotechnology Education and the Department of Biology in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences hosted the American Society for Microbiology's Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE) on the Homewood campus. Bert Vogelstein gave the closing plenary lecture, "Cancers - Their Genomes, Microenvironments, and Susceptibility to Bacteria-based Therapies". He teaches at John Hopkins University.

ASMCUE, now in its 18th year, is a professional development conference for approximately 300 educators. Each year, its steering committee organizes a program that offers access to premier scientists in diverse specialties and to educators leading biology education reform efforts. For more information on the conference, go to http://www.asmcue.org/page02d.shtml

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Michio Kaku: Can Nanotechnology Create Utopia?

Dr. Kaku addresses the question of the possibility of utopia, the perfect society that people have tried to create throughout history. These dreams have not been realized because we have scarcity. However, now we have nanotechnology, and with nanotechnology, perhaps, says Dr. Michio Kaku, maybe in 100 years, we'll have something called the replicator, which will create enormous abundance.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Seth Lloyd on Quantum Life

Big Ideas presents Seth Lloyd of the Massachusetts Institute for Technology on Quantum Life, how organisms have evolved to make use of quantum effects.
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NCBI YouTube Channel - YouTube

NCBI YouTube Channel - YouTube | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology Information including presentations and tutorials about NCBI biomolecular and biomedical literature databases and tools.
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Google Workshop on Quantum Biology: Classical and Quantum Information in DNA

DNA stores and replicates information. Special sequences of different nucleic acids (adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine) encode life's blueprints. These nucleic acids can be divided into a classical part (massive core) and a quantum part (electron shell and single protons). The laws of quantum mechanics map the classical information (A,C,G,T) onto the configuration of electrons and position of single protons. Although DNA replication requires perfect copies of the classical information, the core that constitutes this information does not directly interact with the copying machine. Instead, only the quantum degrees of freedom are measured. Thus successful copying requires a correct translation of classical to quantum to classical information. It has been shown that the electronic system is well shielded from thermal noise. This leads to entanglement inside the DNA helix. It is an open question if this entanglement influences the genetic information processing. In this talk I will discuss possible consequences of entanglement for the information flow and the similarities and differences between classical computing, quantum computing and DNA information processing.

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NOVA: Magnetic Pole Flip 530,000 Years Overdue & Happening Now?

Since the 70s, the Magnetic North Pole has moved more than 1500 km at a rate of 10 kilometres a year. In the 1980s, this increased to 30 km a year. Today, the Pole travels 50, even 60 km - close to 150 metres a day.

 

Scientists don't quite know why its speed has increased these past 20 years. The magnetic pole is moving northwest of the geographic pole and may soon be across the Arctic Ocean in Siberia.


To find their bearings, sailors the world over must know the exact angle of difference between the two geographic and the magnetic north poles: the 'magnetic declination.'


The magnetic pole moves from the North to the South and vice versa every 250,000 years on average and does it very suddenly. Over 180 reversals have been recorded already.


As the intensity of the magnetic field tends to diminish, our planet becomes more susceptible to solar storms. In 100 years, the intensity has decreased by 15%."


http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/natureofthings/2010/northgoessouth/

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Dr. Eric Horvitz and Dr. Peter Norvig: The Challenge and Promise of Artificial Intelligence

Join leading researchers Dr. Eric Horvitz of Microsoft Research and Dr. Peter Norvig of Google for an intriguing discussion about the past, present, and future of artificial intelligence, moderated by KQED's Tim Olson.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Adiabatic Quantum Computing talk by Dr. Suzanne Gildert

Playing with adiabatic hardware: From designer potentials to quantum brains - a talk by Dr. Suzanne Gildert given to the Condensed Matter Physics group of the University of Birmingham.

 

More Suzanne Gildert videos: http://tinyurl.com/bv78ar8

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