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Five Myths of Cloud Computing - Techopedia Research Library

Five Myths of Cloud Computing - Techopedia Research Library | Science & Tech | Scoop.it
This white paper on cloud computing, sponsored by HP and Intel®, separates fact from fiction, reality from myth, and, in doing so, will aide senior IT executives as they make decisions around cloud computing.

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What happened to Linux ? - ITProPortal

What happened to Linux ? - ITProPortal | Science & Tech | Scoop.it
ITProPortal
What happened to Linux ? ITProPortal Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, has given up on the idea that Linux (which Ubuntu is based on) will ever supplant Windows, saying that if any OS will be the next...
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HTC One Google Edition firmware available for all users

HTC One Google Edition firmware available for all users | Science & Tech | Scoop.it

The HTC One Google Edition firmware will be official available for the users of "normal" HTC One, so all HTC One users benefit from stock Android

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Types of Clouds in Cloud Computing

Types of Clouds in Cloud Computing | Science & Tech | Scoop.it

Types of Clouds in Cloud Computing http://su.pr/2qIBaP #biz #tips #bizchat #bizrt #CEO #business

 

 


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Dog And Human Genomes Evolved Together

Dog And Human Genomes Evolved Together | Science & Tech | Scoop.it
A new study finds that genes for diet, behavior, and disease in dogs and humans have evolved together.

 

Researchers from the University of Chicago and several international institutions found that several groups of genes in humans and dogs—including those related to diet and digestion, neurological processes, and disease—have been evolving in parallel for thousands of years.

This parallel evolution was likely driven by the shared environments of humans and dogs, wrote the authors in a study published May 14, 2013 in the journal Nature Communications.

 

"As domestication is often associated with large increases in population density and crowded living conditions, these 'unfavorable' environments might be the selective pressure that drove the rewiring of both species," the authors surmise.

 

For example, living in crowded conditions with humans may have conferred an advantage on less aggressive dogs, leading to more submissive canines and eventually to the pets whose puppy-dog eyes gaze at us with unconditional affection.

 

The study authors suggest that dogs were domesticated 32,000 years ago; that's much earlier than current estimates, which place domestication at around 15,000 to 16,000 years ago.

 

"Thirty-two thousand is a little bit old," said Bob Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles. Although he does acknowledge that the timing of a split between wolves and dogs has varied widely—ranging between 6,000 and 120,000 years ago.

 


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Texas Advanced Computing Center - Hip-Hip-Hadoop: Data Mining for Science

Texas Advanced Computing Center - Hip-Hip-Hadoop: Data Mining for Science | Science & Tech | Scoop.it

The model of distributed calculations, where a problem is broken down into distinct parts that can be solved individually on a computer and then recombined, has been around for decades. Divide-and-conquer techniques allow scientists to predict complex phenomenon from tornado formation to the qualities of nanomaterials to tomorrow's weather forecast.

 

But when Google developed the MapReduce algorithm, it added a distinct wrinkle to this method of distributed computing and opened new doors for commercial and scientific endeavors.

 

Apache Hadoop is an open-source software framework that evolved from Google's MapReduce algorithm. Many Internet giants — Facebook, Yahoo, eBay, Twitter — rely on Hadoop to crunch data across thousands of computer servers in order to quickly identify and serve customized data to consumers.


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What is Quantum Computing? An interactive explainer

What is Quantum Computing? An interactive explainer | Science & Tech | Scoop.it

Scientists say quantum computers could be built to operate up to a million times faster than conventional computers. But how do they work? And how close are we to putting them in homes and offices around the world?


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luiy's curator insight, June 2, 2013 4:38 PM

Between D-Wave’s quasi-quantum device and various ion-trapping machines, there are plenty of exciting developments on the quantum computing front. Last week, a D-Wave machine consisting of 439 qubits processed an equation 3600 times faster than a conventional computer.

That said, the most complex prime factorization processed by Shor’s Algorithm is still only... 21 (the answer’s 3 and 7. Easy to come up with on paper, not so easy using atoms).

 

But quantum computing is about more than cracking codes. The D-Wave device Google announced last week will be used to improve machine learning. That means better robots and maybe dystopia, if you believe our editor Adam Penenberg. But it also means producing better models for understanding the world around us (and, since this is Google we’re talking about, better models for organizing and searching through all that data).

“Machine learning is all about building better models of the world to make more accurate predictions,” writes Google’s Director of Engineering Hartmut Neven in a blog post. “If we want to cure diseases, we need better models of how they develop. If we want to create effective environmental policies, we need better models of what’s happening to our climate. And if we want to build a more useful search engine, we need to better understand spoken questions and what’s on the web so you get the best answer.”

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Atheer Mobile 3-D Interface Combines Google Glass Wearable Computing with ... - Hot Hardware

Atheer Mobile 3-D Interface Combines Google Glass Wearable Computing with ... - Hot Hardware | Science & Tech | Scoop.it
Atheer Mobile 3-D Interface Combines Google Glass Wearable Computing with ...
Hot Hardware
3D? Virtual reality? It's all commonplace these days, and a new company is hoping to take advantage of those shifting consumer expectations.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:18 AM

Something else to ask Santa for this Xmas! ;)

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NASA - Materials Manufactured from 3D Printed Synthetic Biology Arrays

NASA - Materials Manufactured from 3D Printed Synthetic Biology Arrays | Science & Tech | Scoop.it
Materials Manufactured from 3D Printed Synthetic Biology Arrays

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, June 3, 2013 3:52 PM

Team:
Diana Gentry, NASA Ames Research Center, SGE, Samson Phan, Stanford University, Lynn J. Rothschild (POC), NASA Ames Research Center, SGE

"The Problem

Complex, biologically derived materials (such as wood and silk) often have extremely useful properties. However, their use in space-related applications is hampered by two primary drawbacks: Expensive, specific production. Many of these materials can only be produced as part of significant support ecosystem. For example, spider silk can only be produced by providing a contained, sustainable habitat and appropriate food for selected species of spiders, and can then only be harvested in relatively small quantities by a laborious human-intensive process. These overhead requirements simply add too much upmass for a potential Mars habitat mission. Limited manufacturing compatibility. Collecting and processing many such materials (for example, cotton) requires specialized equipment that adds impractical upmass or resource requirements to a potential self-contained habitat. Many cannot be worked with modern micro-scale manufacturing techniques at all (e.g., wood), limiting their use in creating potentially useful composite structures.  The VisionUsing structured arrays of biologically engineered cells to deposit or excrete biological materials in a specified composite pattern creating novel biomaterials and biocomposites.Complex, biologically derived materials (such as wood and silk) often have extremely useful properties but their use in space-related applications is hampered by expensive production, and the limited manufacturing compatibility with space (e.g., upmass and resource requirements.) Many cannot be worked with micro-scale manufacturing techniques (e.g., wood).The innovation of this project is the application of synthetic biology to 3D printing technology. Their combination presents significant challenges. Potential impactIf successful, this application would dramatically expand manufacturing capabilities on Earth and in space: In situ resource utilization. The ability to make a far greater range of materials and products out of the limited basic resource palette offered by existing in situ resource extraction techniques. Reduced equipment and material upmass for off-Earth habitats. Production of a wide variety of ready-to-use highly specialized construction materials (radiation hardened, compressive/tensile, light or dense) from an extremely low starting mass, allowing for flexible production of working and living spaces tailored to off planet environments. Structured biomaterial production. New ready-to-use macro, micro, and molecular manufacturing techniques for traditional materials such as wood, including finely calibrated microstructures. New and novel biocomposite creation. The ability to create completely novel material composites from any base material that ...."



 http://1.usa.gov/11dTVgv