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Digital Storytelling in Education

Antonia Liguori (Loughborough University) interviewed Steve Bellis, Lecturer in Media, to discuss about challenges and opportunities of using the digital sto...

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To Create Change, Leadership Is More Important Than Authority

To Create Change, Leadership Is More Important Than Authority | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

Aspiring junior executives dream of climbing the ladder to gain more authority.  Then they can make things happen and create the change that they believe in.  Senior executives, on the other hand, are often frustrated by how little power they actually have.

 

The problem is that, while authority can compel action, it does little to inspire belief.  It’s not enough to get people to do what you want, they also have to want what you want — or any change is bound to be short lived.

 

That’s why change management efforts commonly fail.  All too often, they are designed to carry out initiatives that come from the top.  When you get right down to it, that’s really the just same thing as telling people to do what you want, albeit in slightly more artful way.  To make change really happen, it doesn’t need to be managed, but empowered. That’s the difference between authority and leadership.


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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 21, 2014 2:43 PM

Greg Satell on #HBR
Change always requires #leadership rather than #authroity 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 21, 2014 8:47 PM

This is interesting. It explains why so little changes in bureaucratic institutions i.e. school. There is little in terms of leadership and not much authority. What is exercised is coercive power.

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Science or Art? Beautiful Illustrations of Animals From 170 Years Ago

Science or Art? Beautiful Illustrations of Animals From 170 Years Ago | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

Published in 1844, the Atlas de Zoologie: ou collection de 100 planches contains illustrations of a number of creatures, some of which no longer walk this planet. 


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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, April 19, 2014 3:43 AM

Published in 1844, the Atlas de Zoologie: ou collection de 100 planches contains illustrations of a number of creatures, some of which no longer walk this planet. Among those are thylacines — striped, carnivorous marsupials that went extinct when the last known specimen died in a Tasmanian zoo in 1936.

Click to watch Galley.

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The Psychology of Messiness: How Disorder Can Make You More Creative

The Psychology of Messiness: How Disorder Can Make You More Creative | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
Kathleen Vohs, a marketing professor at the University of Minnesota with an extensive psychology background, believes that messier office spaces spur creativity. Here's the evidence.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 2014 8:14 PM

Order always emerges out of chaos and chaos needs order it remains chaos and cannot be creative.

Sabine Henrichfreise's curator insight, April 8, 2014 5:32 AM

Embracing Uncertainty and Complexity enables Great Leaders to gather the whole system in one room and to innovate across systems. 

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What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn?

What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn? | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
What keeps students motivated to learn? Relevance, connections, and their teachers' emotional investment, among just a few criteria.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:43 PM

Teachers and students want to find meaning in their learning which suggests choice. Integrating learning makes sense because it is more likely to appeal to students.

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Does intuition affect decisions?

Does intuition affect decisions? | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

As a follow-up to my earlier post about the brain and gut decisions, I want to share my conversation with Erica Ariel Fox for my Leadership: A Master Class about how intuition can factor into good decision-making. Erica Ariel Fox is a lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, and part of the internationally acclaimed Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

“Let’s look at Malcolm Gladwell’s concept of thin-slicing. My interpretation: you are in fact cognitively perceiving data, it’s just that you’re doing it so quickly. With pattern recognition from past experience, what you experience as intuitive is actually just unbelievably quick cognitive processing.

There are also arguments that when the emotional part of the brain is damaged, people can’t make decisions: you need the right and left hand side of the brain, the cognitive and the emotional. I think that is right for certain kinds of decisions, such as when you’re gathering information and trying to make meaning or make sense out of information.

But these approaches to decision-making don’t address what might be called direct knowing: I know this, but I don’t know how I know it. I didn’t read it in a book. Nobody told it to me. I didn’t have an Excel spreadsheet that laid it out for me. Nonetheless, I know it.

I think we have a set of skills that coaches and leaders who work with teams might call “reading the room.” Others call it attunement or discernment. It’s not data processing and thin-slicing, and it’s also not having an emotional evaluation of decisions. It’s a sensing. When I work with a team in crisis, tuning in to the group’s feelings and emotions really helps me ask the right questions about what’s happening.

People will be shocked when they think back over the course of their lives, ‘when I made that decision, I actually knew it was wrong, but I didn’t trust the part of me that was telling me not to do it.’ Or they say, ‘It was the craziest thing. I made this decision. Everyone in my life thought I was insane, but I just knew it was right, and it turned out it was the best decision I ever made.’”

How does this concept resonate with you? How would you explain intuition in relation to decision-making?


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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:57 AM

It's possible.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:48 PM

Without reading the article, I would say yes. When I read the article, it bore that out. Complexity science literature points out we use intuition largely below the radar.

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Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators & Constructivists

Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators & Constructivists | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

At the heart of this move to Education 3.0 is learner engagement, something that has been lacking in classroom learning thus far. Contrary to being a fault of any teacher, low-engagement is simply a byproduct of curriculum’s irrelevance to students’ immediate and future situations.


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Mrs. Monsour's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:29 PM

How will this change the face of the future?

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Getting Parents Involved in Schools

Getting Parents Involved in Schools | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
Parent involvement continues to challenge practitioners engaged in school reform despite being a required component of many school improvement initiatives-from Title I Schoolwide Programs to federally mandated school improvement plans. The benefits of parent involvement are clear: A growing body of research shows that successful parent involvement improves not only student behavior and attendance but also positively affects student achievement.

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 4, 2014 2:55 PM

excerpt: "Of course, the use of any strategy must be tailored to the school's population. If families don't have reliable access to the Internet, e-mail won't work. A phone message in English won't communicate much to parents who speak only Spanish. The bottom line for schools is to communicate using strategies that convey what is important in a way that can be heard by parents and families and invites them to respond."

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 4, 2014 6:25 PM

This is a great article. I would add do not let the bureaucrats and technocrats get involved.

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Astronomers vs. Kids - The Expanding Universe - YouTube

Did you know the Universe is expanding and that it's getting faster all the time? Professor Brian Schmidt is here to tell you why. Help us caption & translat...
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Creating online learning with Riddle

Creating online learning with Riddle | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

On the surface Riddle is a great free tool for creating a variety of quizzes and polls that can have rich media embedded into them, but when you look below the surface it's actually a pretty sophisticated tool for quickly authoring engaging elearning.


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learn foreign language skills's curator insight, November 8, 2015 4:25 AM

potential for language learning, assessment

Lee Hall's curator insight, November 10, 2015 10:23 AM

This helps with formative assessment too.

Luis Otero's curator insight, November 13, 2015 1:13 PM

Excelente instrumento para interactuar con el alumando y entre el alumnado. Espero que dure mucho la versión "free"

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Connectivism as a Learning Theory


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 21, 2014 10:07 PM

There is something remarkably phenomenological about what is being described as connectivism. We encounter a phenomenon and it, in turn, encounters us and a connection is made.

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Connected Learning: Harnessing the Information Age to Make Learning More Powerful

Connected Learning: Harnessing the Information Age to Make Learning More Powerful | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

This report introduces connected learning, a promising educational approach that uses digital media to engage students’ interests and instill deeper learning skills, such as communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. The report lists four elements constituting connected learning’s emphasis on bridging school, popular culture, home, and the community to create an environment in which students engage in and take responsibility for their learning.


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dawsonloane's curator insight, April 7, 2014 6:35 AM

This report focuses on school-age learners, but the emphasis on deeper learning skills, such as communication, collaboration, and critical thinking is definitely applicable to professional development.

eLearningTV's curator insight, May 6, 2014 1:38 AM

Learning is going to be connected and open in future.

Mo Ferguson's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:28 PM

Shared

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21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics? | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
By Linda Fisher Thornton

Ethical expectations are continually increasing, and it is not always easy for leaders to keep up with the changes. This week, I'm sharing an assessment to help you answ...

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18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. Creative thinking is a stable, defining characteristic in some personalities, but it may also change based on situation and context. Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process.


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Comunicologos.com's curator insight, March 9, 2014 4:34 PM

Creativity works

Carole Maurage's curator insight, March 12, 2014 3:37 AM

Créatifs ! Ne vous demandez plus pourquoi vous vous sentez différent. Un très bon article sur les comportements des personnes naturellement plus créatives.

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31 Most Invaluable Pieces Of Writing Advice From Famous Authors

31 Most Invaluable Pieces Of Writing Advice From Famous Authors | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
Many avid readers are also avid writers. It only makes sense that someone who loves the beauty of language would want to make a craft of it.

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Lee Hall's curator insight, May 29, 2013 1:43 PM

If you teach writing, you will want to use some of these with your students.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 4, 2014 6:23 PM

Mark Twain looking out at me told me I needed to scoop this one.

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The Awkward 'Privacy Talk' Parents Should Have With Their Kids

The Awkward 'Privacy Talk' Parents Should Have With Their Kids | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it
Parents across the world today need to have a new conversation with their kids. No, it’s not about behaving in class, not talking to strangers, or having sex. But in so many ways, it's just as important. It’s data permanence. How we can preserve our reputations in the digital era?

 

It’s a conversation that will look very different in different parts of the world. In some places, kids will have to think twice before posting photos of teenage escapades, given how such photos may look to others in a professional environment even many years later. In other places, kids will have to be careful of posting any items that may “dishonor” them or their family in some way.


In still other places, kids will have to think about whether what they post on sensitive political, ethnic, or religious issues may define them long after they have changed their views.



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Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:05 AM

We have been having these types of important discussions with our students in digital literacy classes. What is interesting to note is that it becomes a parent piece that often schools have to provide to help them keep up with their children and  the good, bad and the ugly of technology.

 

Noeline Laccetti's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:47 AM

Data permanence must be addressed with ALL children, and well before the "sex talk" 

Jenny Ritchie's curator insight, March 5, 2014 7:36 PM

New technologies have exposed behaviours of young people which have put their future success at risk.  Are these new behaviours created by the opportunities that are provided by new technology?  Or are these behaviours that would have been typical of young people even without the technologies they use as a vehicle to display them?

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The Invention Of 'The Economy'

The Invention Of 'The Economy' | Science teaching ideas and resources | Scoop.it

"Until the Great Depression, nobody talked about 'the economy.' In a sense, it hadn't been invented yet."


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Darius Douglass's curator insight, March 3, 2014 3:59 PM

A little history here, What we call the GDP is not really scientific #GDP #NationalIncome  #indicator #health

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:54 PM

Seth Dixon has it right. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 4:01 PM

The parameters of the measure of the economy are so broad that the numbers don't really mean anything. Each country counts different things. The GDP of the US cannot be compared to the GDP of other countries because the cost of living in each place is so wildly different. When compared to Japan our economies are close but compared to any country in Africa they are completely different. Measurement of the economy is not an overly useful number.