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60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says

60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says | Science stories | Scoop.it

 

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread?

 

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. 

 

Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Linda Liem's insight:

Science fiction may be coming true.

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aanve's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:38 PM
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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Golden Rice, Golden Opportunity.

Golden Rice, Golden Opportunity. | Science stories | Scoop.it
You people in the developed world are certainly free to debate the merits of genetically modified foods, but can we please eat first?” - Dr. Florence WambuguThe blind girl lurched toward me across the parking lot at Tirta Empul temple, mewling.
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Unexpected teleconnections in noctilucent clouds

Unexpected teleconnections in noctilucent clouds | Science stories | Scoop.it
Earth’s poles are separated by four oceans, six continents and more than 12,000 nautical miles. Turns out, that’s not so far apart.
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Saturn May Have Given Birth To a Baby Moon - Slashdot

Saturn May Have Given Birth To a Baby Moon - Slashdot | Science stories | Scoop.it
astroengine (1577233) writes "NASA's Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft has imaged something peculiar on the outermost edge of the gas giant's A-ring.
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3, 2, 1...Project MERCCURI Blasts Off to the ISS Today!! - CitizenSci

3, 2, 1...Project MERCCURI Blasts Off to the ISS Today!! - CitizenSci | Science stories | Scoop.it
What happens when you combine professional cheerleaders, microbiologists, and astronauts? The answer is Project MERCCURI and the Microbial Playoffs… in SPA
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A Tale of Two Mountains

A Tale of Two Mountains | Science stories | Scoop.it
While Californians wondered what happened to the snow, those in Wyoming and Montana wondered when the snow would stop falling.
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50 Years Ago This Terrifying Megaquake Jolted an Entire Ocean - Wired Science

50 Years Ago This Terrifying Megaquake Jolted an Entire Ocean - Wired Science | Science stories | Scoop.it
Fifty years ago today, a huge earthquake struck Alaska, sending massive tsunamis across the globe.
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The President’s Climate Data Initiative

The President’s Climate Data Initiative | Science stories | Scoop.it
“Climate change is a fact.  And when our children’s children look us in the eye and ask if we did all we could to leave them a safer, more stable world, with new sources of energy, I want us to be able to say yes, we did.”– President Barack Obama, State of the Union Address, January 28, 2014
Linda Liem's insight:
Interesting fact sheet of the White House on Climate Change initiatives.
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Lava fossilised this Jurassic fern down to its cells - life - 21 March 2014 - New Scientist

Lava fossilised this Jurassic fern down to its cells - life - 21 March 2014 - New Scientist | Science stories | Scoop.it
This incredibly detailed fossil shows individual chromosomes splitting – courtesy of a mini-catastrophe 180 million years ago.
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Big Bang Celebration: Physicist Learns His Life's Work Vindicated

Big Bang Celebration: Physicist Learns His Life's Work Vindicated | Science stories | Scoop.it
The biggest news in science since the Big Bang Theory confirmed that the universe indeed underwent an epoch of rapid expansion.
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Watch Andrei Dmitriyevich Linde, the father of the inflation theory, when he hears the news.
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60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says

60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says | Science stories | Scoop.it

 

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread?

 

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. 

 

Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Linda Liem's insight:

Science fiction may be coming true.

more...
aanve's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:38 PM
www.aanve.com
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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A Thousand Miles from Nowhere

A Thousand Miles from Nowhere | Science stories | Scoop.it
Bouvet Island is one of the remotest places on earth.
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There you go... if you like peace and quiet, Norway is the place to go!
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Apollo 11 Play Aims To Showcase Landing To Teenagers And Inspire Space Love

Apollo 11 Play Aims To Showcase Landing To Teenagers And Inspire Space Love | Science stories | Scoop.it
To bring the inspiration of Apollo 11 to a younger audience, one high school teacher in Maryland took it upon himself to write a play for secondary school students — including much of the original transcript, right down to the “nouns” and “verbs” of the computers the astronauts used.
Linda Liem's insight:
Talking about immersive learning! This should really convey the excitement of this historical event to the students.
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Miniaturized hearing aids that will fit into the ear canal

Miniaturized hearing aids that will fit into the ear canal | Science stories | Scoop.it
Fraunhofer researchers pack a total of 19 hearing-aid components (left) into their new microsystem (right). System-on-chip integrated circuit, high-frequency

 

The technology is also suitable for implants, pacemakers, and insulin pumps. This all means that the system uses only a fraction of the energy required by conventional devices, keeping cumbersome battery changes to a minimum. “Ideally, patients should not even be feeling of wearing the hearing aid over long periods of time,” says Dr. Dionysios Manessis from Fraunhofer Institute of Reliability and Microintegration IZM in Berlin.

 

With dimensions of just 4 mm by 4mm by 1 mm, the new microsystem is fifty times smaller than the current models. To achieve this, the project partners first developed especially small components such as innovative miniature antennas, system-on-chip integrated circuitry and high frequency filters, then integrated the 19 discrete components in a single module, using a modular 3D stacking concept that saves extra space.

 

Hearing aids worn behind the ear are powered by a 180mAh  (milliampere hour) battery, which must be either replaced or recharged approximately every two weeks. The aim is to minimize the system’s energy consumption to around one milliwatt (mW) to extend battery life up to 20 weeks.

 

The development is part of the EU WiserBAN project. Project partners are also looking to optimize energy management. The WiserBAN project partners are also developing special antenna and wireless protocols that can communicate information such as pulse, blood pressure, or glucose levels straight to a physician’s tablet or smartphone. The resulting WiserBAN wireless system makes obsolete the relay station — an extra device that patients have previously been obliged to wear to extend the communication range.

 

Another advantage is that the wireless protocols developed within the WiserBAN project are based on the reliable IEEE 802.15.4 and 802.15.6 standards. Conventional devices have ordinarily relied on Bluetooth, where there are often issues with interference with other devices.

It is hoped that the new technology will act as the springboard for more comfortable, more reliable healthcare products in the future — from long-term electrocardiography to insulin pumps. Furthermore, there is the potential to use the microsystem in implants and pacemakers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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9 Reasons to Love the Amazing Snow Monkey

9 Reasons to Love the Amazing Snow Monkey | Science stories | Scoop.it
Snow monkeys (also known as Japanese macaques) are a cute, fun-loving bunch. Adorable as they may be, there’s much more to this primate than just a pretty face.
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Paper Microscope Magnifies Objects 2100 Times and Costs Less Than $1 - Slashdot

Paper Microscope Magnifies Objects 2100 Times and Costs Less Than $1 - Slashdot | Science stories | Scoop.it
ananyo writes: "If ever a technology were ripe for disruption, it is the microscope. Microscopes are expensive and need to be serviced and maintained.
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What is a Blood Moon? | EarthSky.org

What is a Blood Moon? | EarthSky.org | Science stories | Scoop.it
Want to know the dates for the Blood Moons and total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015? You've come to the right place ...
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Climate Panel Sees Global Warming Impacts on All Continents, Worse to Come

Climate Panel Sees Global Warming Impacts on All Continents, Worse to Come | Science stories | Scoop.it
The new U.N. climate panel report on impacts of global warming sees substantial shifts already under way and much more to come.
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Hello, Ice Ball: The Solar System’s Newest Distant Member

Hello, Ice Ball: The Solar System’s Newest Distant Member | Science stories | Scoop.it
Astronomers have announced the discovery of an amazing object in our solar system: 2012 VP113, an icy body with an orbit so big it never gets closer than 12 billion kilometers (7.4 billion miles) from the Sun!
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Night scene from Kvænangsfjellet in Norway

Night scene from Kvænangsfjellet in Norway | Science stories | Scoop.it
A spring color palette, and yet ... so chilly.
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Beautiful colours in the sky!
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ScienceShot: 'Chicken From Hell' Unearthed in American Midwest

ScienceShot: 'Chicken From Hell' Unearthed in American Midwest | Science stories | Scoop.it
This newly described dinosaur might look like a chicken, but don’t be fooled: It was nearly 4 meters long, weighed about 250 kilograms, and lived 66 million years ago in what is today the Hell Creek rock formation in North and South Dakota.
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Scientists Hack Plants With Nanotubes to Supercharge Photosynthesis - Wired Science

Scientists Hack Plants With Nanotubes to Supercharge Photosynthesis - Wired Science | Science stories | Scoop.it
By incorporating nanomaterials into the energy-producing structures inside plants, scientists have managed to turn an ordinary plant into a super plant (no phone booth required).
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Star of the week: Pollux is the brighter of two Twin stars

Star of the week: Pollux is the brighter of two Twin stars | Science stories | Scoop.it
Pollux is the brighter of two bright stars in the constellation Gemini the Twins. It is the 17th brightest star in our sky.
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On my observation list for March!
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Snow Flake Formation Under a Microscope | Big Think TV

Snow Flake Formation Under a Microscope | Big Think TV | Science stories | Scoop.it
Russian filmmaker Vyacheslav Ivanov recorded the mesmerizing formation of snow flakes under a microscope in this breathtaking video.
Linda Liem's insight:
Stunning and beautiful illustration of how snowflakes grow.
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Stunning Electric-Blue Flames Erupt From Volcanoes

Stunning Electric-Blue Flames Erupt From Volcanoes | Science stories | Scoop.it

Burning sulfur forms lava-like rivers of light at Indonesia's Kawah Ijen volcano and other craters.

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