Science ouverte -...
Follow
Find
4.8K views | +7 today
 
Scooped by Florence Piron
onto Science ouverte - Open science
Scoop.it!

Towards Open Access to Government Science: The Obama Administration Takes Some Important Steps - The Equation

Towards Open Access to Government Science: The Obama Administration Takes Some Important Steps - The Equation | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Federal agency grades for their media and social media policies scoring how well they grant government scientists’ freedom to speak to the media and the public.

The administration’s actions this month follow a February memo from the White House Science Adviser John Holdren. The memo asked federal agencies to develop policies that increase access to federally funded research:

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) hereby directs each Federal agency with over $100 million in annual conduct of research and development expenditures to develop a plan to support increased public access to the results of research funded by the Federal Government.

This is all part of the broader Digital Government Strategy launched over a year ago. And together, this wave of action from the federal government is an important step toward better access to the science done at federal agencies.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Science ouverte - Open science
Cinq thèmes sont suivis dans ce scoop.it : le libre accès (Open Access), la science citoyenne (citizen science), la science en ligne (Open Science), la science 2.0 et les cours en ligne gratuits (MOOCs).
Curated by Florence Piron
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Florence Piron from Open access in science
Scoop.it!

Open Access : Les bibliothèques académiques freinées par les budgets

Open Access : Les bibliothèques académiques freinées par les budgets | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Les coûts d'intégration et la gestion des publications Open Access inquiètent les bibliothécaires

Via MyScienceWork
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

The Republic of Open Science - The institution’s Historical Origins and Prospects for Continued Vitality | SIEPR

The Republic of Open Science - The institution’s Historical Origins and Prospects for Continued Vitality | SIEPR | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

In most modern economies scientific and technological research activities are conducted in two distinct organizational modes: commercially oriented R&D based upon proprietary information, and noncommercial “open science.” When taken together and kept in proper balance, these form a complementary pair of institutionally differentiated sub-systems. Each can work to amplify and augment the productivity of the other, thereby spurring long-term economic growth and improvements of social welfare in knowledge driven societies. This paper considers the difference between historical origins of open science and its modern, critically important role in the allocation of research resources. The institutional structure of ‘The Republic of Open Science’ generally is less well understood and has less robust self-sustaining foundations than the familiar non-cooperative market mechanisms associated with proprietary R&D. Although they are better suited for the conduct of exploratory science, they also remain more vulnerable to damages from collateral effects of shifts in government policies, particularly those that impact their fiscal support and regulatory environments. After reviewing the several challenges that such policy actions during the 20th century’s closing decades had posed for continued effective collective explorations at the frontiers of scientific knowledge, the discussion examines the responses that those developments elicited from academic research communities. Those reactions to the threatened curtailment of timely access to data and technical information about new research methods and findings took the form of technical and organizational innovations designed to expand and enhance infrastructural protections for sustained open access in scientific and scholarly communications. They were practical, “bottom-up” initiatives to provide concrete, domain relevant tools and organizational routines whose adoption subsequently could be, and in the event were reinforced by “top-down” policy guidelines and regulatory steps by public funding agencies and international bodies. The non-politicized nature of that process, as well as its largely effective outcomes should be read (cautiously) as positive portents of the future vitality of the Republic of Open Science – and of those societies that recognize, protect and adequately support this remarkable social innovation.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Florence Piron from Higher Education and academic research
Scoop.it!

Open access is not enough on its own – data must be free too

Open access is not enough on its own – data must be free too | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Academics have been encouraged to make their research freely available, but their data also needs to be open to scrutiny.

 

If your research has been funded by the taxpayer, there's a good chance you'll be encouraged to publish your results on an open access basis – free at point of publication and with reuse and redistribution rights. (...) - by Susanna-Assunta Sansone, The Guardian, 26 June 2014


Via Tree of Science, Collectif PAPERA
more...
Tree of Science's curator insight, August 12, 10:31 AM

Open access to the publication of the research is one on the step to the open research. To go further, this evolution in process must be linked to open data to really reach open science

Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

What lesson do rising retraction rates hold for peer review?

What lesson do rising retraction rates hold for peer review? | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
In January, Haruko Obokata and colleagues published two papers in the journal Nature suggesting that a simple acid bath can convert differentiated cells back to a stem-cell-like state. This finding, if…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Open Access: Students help revive and digitize rare books for Malayalam Wiki Library

Open Access: Students help revive and digitize rare books for Malayalam Wiki Library | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The New Indian Express reports that in a terrific effort, more than 1000 school students and 234 members of the public across the state of Kerala digitized, pro
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Interview with Ross Mounce University of Bath | Opensource.com

Interview with Ross Mounce University of Bath | Opensource.com | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Marcus Hanwell of Kitware interviews Ross Mounce, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bath studying the use of fossils in phylogeny and phyloinformatics. Ross was one of the first Panton Fellows and is an active member of the Open Knowledge Foundation, particularly the Open Science Working Group. He is an advocate for open science, and he is actively working on content mining academic publications to reuse scientific research in meta-analyses to gain higher level insights in evolutionary patterns.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Les Creative Commons seront implémentées dans l'archive ouverte HAL version 3 !

Les Creative Commons seront implémentées dans l'archive ouverte HAL version 3 ! | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Mise à jour du 25/06/2014. Suite à la publication de cet article,  le CCSD apporte en commentaire le rectificatif suivant : "la recherche dans le texte intégral de tous les pdf déposés dans HAL ser...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Michel Serres : « Plus que jamais, la science peut se raconter » | La Recherche

Michel Serres : « Plus que jamais, la science peut se raconter » | La Recherche | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Le livre de science a-t-il encore sa place à l'heure du tout numérique ? Pour le philosophe Michel Serres*, le support importe peu. Ce qui compte, c'est que la science permet d'écrire l'histoire du monde comme un grand récit. Car elle sait depuis peu dater la plupart de ses objets d'études.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Why Full Open Access Matters (Carroll 2011)

Why Full Open Access Matters (Carroll 2011) | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Scientific authors who pay to publish their articles in an open-access publication should be congratulated for doing so. They also should be aware that they may not be getting full open access from some publications that charge for publication under the “open access” label. Two features define an open-access publication: (1) the published contents are freely accessible through the Internet, and (2) readers are given copyright permission (see Box 1) to republish or reuse the content as they like so long as the author and publisher receive proper attribution [1]. Recently, some publications have begun offering an open-access option that charges for Internet publication without granting readers full reuse rights, such as Springer's Open Choice or Nature's Scientific Reports. These publishers have adopted a business model through which authors pay for immediate publication on the Internet but the publisher nonetheless keeps commercial reuse rights for itself. This is not full open access (see Box 2).


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Cartographier l’écosytème de l’Open Science pour mieux comprendre ses enjeux

Cartographier l’écosytème de l’Open Science pour mieux comprendre ses enjeux | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Dans le cadre d’Open experience, une première étape a été de mieux comprendre ce que l’Open Science représente dans le système de la recherche actuelle pour ainsi définir les différents acteurs et les services/actions/produits liés. Pour cela, nous avons mis au point une première cartographie de l’écosystème. Cette cartographie a été présentée lors d’Open Experience # 4 sur l’open Science et a nourri un débat fructueux sur la remise en cause de modèles économiques dominants et des premières tentatives de nouveaux modèles avec l’Open Science.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Scholarly access to all

Scholarly access to all | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Harvard digital repository draws millions of readers, ranging from the academic community to the global public

Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard, a free and open portal for the University’s peer-reviewed literature, is drawing more worldwide downloads than ever.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Reactionary Rhetoric Against Open Access Publishing

Reactionary Rhetoric Against Open Access Publishing | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Wayne Bivens-Tatum

Princeton University, Princeton NJ, USA, rbivens@princeton.edu, http://blogs.princeton.edu/librarian

Abstract: In 2013, Jeffrey Beall published an attack on the open-access scholarship movement in tripleC: “The Open-Access Movement Is Not Really About Open Access”. This article examines the claims and arguments of that contribution. Beall’s article makes broad generalizations about open-access advocates with very little supporting evidence, but his rhetoric provides good examples of what Albert O. Hirschman called the “rhetoric of reaction”. Specifically, it provides examples of the perversity thesis, the futility thesis, and the jeopardy thesis in action. While the main argument is both unsound and invalid, it does show a rare example of reactionary rhetoric from a librarian.

Florence Piron's insight:

Excellent!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Commercial enclosure: Whatever happened to open access? | Radical Philosophy

Commercial enclosure: Whatever happened to open access? | Radical Philosophy | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
John Holmwood asks: what happened to open access?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Crowd-Sourced Peer Review: Substitute or supplement for the current outdated system?

Crowd-Sourced Peer Review: Substitute or supplement for the current outdated system? | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The problem with peer review today is that there is so much research being produced that there are not enough experts with enough time to peer-review it all. As we look to address this problem, iss...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Open science case studies | Research Information Network

Open science case studies | Research Information Network | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

The RIN and the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA) have published the results of a new collaborative research project which examined the benefits and barriers to using ‘open science’ methods. The project aimed to identify what motivates researchers to work (or want to work) in an open manner with regard to their data, results and protocols, and whether advantages are delivered by working in this way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

The rise and rise of Creative Commons: Over 1.2M CC Licensed Scholarly Articles - PLOS Opens

The rise and rise of Creative Commons: Over 1.2M CC Licensed Scholarly Articles - PLOS Opens | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
In our call to the STM Association to withdraw their model licenses we drew attention to the fact that Creative Commons licenses are a de facto global standard. But sometimes it is claimed that (as the STM Association did in …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

The World Academy of Sciences funds Open Access in developing countries | Open Science

The World Academy of Sciences funds Open Access in developing countries | Open Science | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Funding remains one of the main problems associated with Open Access. If readers do not have to pay for access to scientific knowledge, someone else has to cover costs of publishing. There is a growing number of so-called author-pays journals that offer high quality editorial services and global dissemination of research, but their charges are sometimes too high for researchers from low-income countries. Fortunately, although the majority of funders that support Open Access are based in Western Europe, some offer funding for researchers working in the developing world. One of them is The World Academy of Sciences, established by Abdus Salam, the Pakistani physicist and Nobel laureate. The World Academy of Sciences is based in Triest (Italy), but offers grants mostly to scientists from low-income countries. TWAS grants may cover Article Processing Charges (APC) in Open Access journals. Thanks to them, academics from the developing world may reach a broad audience by publishing in international, Open Access publications. Application calls are open at the moment and August 31 is the deadline for all calls, so there is not much time left. TWAS offers four research grant programs. Three of them are included in the 'TWAS Research program in basic sciences' (for individuals, groups and institutions), where grants can be spent on research in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics, conducted in one of 81 science-and-technology-lagging countries in Asia, Africa and Americas (full list is here). To apply for a grant in basic sciences individually you have to hold a PhD and be under the age of 45. The fourth, 'TWAS-COMSTECH Joint Research Grants', is a program intended for scientists under the age of 40, holding PhD and based in countries belonging to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation. Grants may cover research in earth sciences, engineering sciences, information technology and computer sciences, and materials science including nanotechnology, pharmaceutical sciences and renewable energy. All grants from TWAS may be used to purchase scientific equipment, consumables and specialized textbooks and proceedings. They do not cover salaries or travel expenses. The purchase of laptops and laboratory animals is not supported. See more about grant opportunities on the TWAS web page. If you are a researcher based in a middle or low-income country, have a look also at my post on Wellcome Trust funding opportunities. Visit also a 'Funding Open Access' tag on our blog for more information. | Your guide to Open Access publishing and Open Science
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

‘To tweet or not to tweet?’ A comparison of academics’ and students’ usage of Twitter in academic contexts

‘To tweet or not to tweet?’ A comparison of academics’ and students’ usage of Twitter in academic contexts | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Abstract
The emergence of social media as a new channel for communication and collaboration has led educators to hope that they may enhance the student experience and provide a pedagogical tool within Higher Education (HE). This paper explores academics’ and undergraduates’ usage of Twitter within a post-92 university. It argues that the observed disparity of usage between academics and undergraduates can be attributed to a number of factors. Namely, academics’ perceived use of the platform for enhancing reputation is an implied acknowledgement of the importance of research within HE and the increasingly public engagement agenda. Additionally, academics’ limited usage of Twitter to support practical-based issues may be explained by issues relating to accountability of information through non-official channels. Moreover, students made greater use of Twitter for the passive reception of information rather than participation in learning activities. The implications of these issues will be discussed in reference to the study findings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Article vs Journal Impact – Perspective from PLOS ONE Editorial Director Damian Pattinson

Article vs Journal Impact – Perspective from PLOS ONE Editorial Director Damian Pattinson | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Earlier this summer, I skyped with Damian Pattinson, the Editorial Director of PLOS ONE, about the Impact Factor , its widespread misuse and how, thankfully, Altmetrics now offer a better way forward.

Q. The PLOS ONE Impact Factor has decreased for a few years in a row. Is this to be expected given its ranking as the world’s largest journal and remit to publish all good science regardless of impact?

A. I don’t think the Impact Factor is a very good measure of anything, but clearly it is particularly meaningless for a journal that deliberately eschews evaluation of impact in its publications decisions. Our founding principle was that impact should be evaluated post-publication. In terms of the average number of citations per article, my sense is that this is changing due to the expanding breadth of fields covered by PLOS ONE, not to mention its sheer size (we recently published our 100,000th article). When you grow as quickly as we have, your annual average citation rate will always be suppressed by the fact that you are publishing far more papers at the end of the year than at the beginning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Academic Freedom and the Corporate University

Academic Freedom and the Corporate University | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
In a recent blog, David Browne, Senior Associate on the Employment Team for SGH Martineau, Legal firm with clients in Higher Education argued that universities face the problem that ‘high performin...

What is at issue is precisely what is permitted by virtue of academic position and how that is being been re-interpreted in the new managerial regimes now governing universities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

The Taint of Eugenics In NIMH-Funded Research Today - Robert Whitaker

The Taint of Eugenics In NIMH-Funded Research Today - Robert Whitaker | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Recently, Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, identified the “NIMH’s Top 10 Research Advances of 2011.” He wrote: “This has been a year of exciting discoveries and scientific progress . . . Here are 10 breakthroughs and events of 2011 that are changing the landscape of mental health research.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Open access: effective measures to put UK research online under threat?

Open access: effective measures to put UK research online under threat? | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The universities of the UK should not squander the opportunity to put in place an effective mechanism for making their published research freely available
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Zeste de Savoir - la connaissance pour tous et sans pépins

Zeste de Savoir - la connaissance pour tous et sans pépins | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Zeste de Savoir est un site de partage de connaissances sur lequel vous trouverez des tutoriels de tous niveaux, des articles et des forums d'entraide animés par
et pour la communauté.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Altmetrics : an Indication of Quality Research or Just HOT Topics?

With the widespread use of social media tools in the discovery, dissemination and discussion of research output, altmetric measurements are fast gaining popularity and they supplement the traditional research metrics by tracking the number of social mentions of research articles. In recent years, there a few such tools and they adopt different models and have different coverage. Publishers such as Scopus and PLoS have already incorporated altmetrics in their websites. This paper seeks to make sense of these available tools and evaluate their effectiveness. Do they identify quality research or just HOT topics? This paper also analyses most cited papers from 18 different subject categories in Web of Science (WOS) and compares the results with an altmetrics database to find out the correlation between these 2 sets of data. This paper ends by highlighting how users could leverage altmetrics effectively to disseminate their works to a wider audience.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Florence Piron
Scoop.it!

Open Access and the ASPP | Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

In October 2013, the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences embarked on a multi-year project to develop an Open Access policy for the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP). The initial phase focused on research and information gathering, including a scan of international and Canadian policy and practice, and informal discussions with several groups from Canada and around the world. Out of this process, the Federation developed a draft policy position for consultation, based on the following principles:   

The Federation supports Open Access; and  A dynamic Canadian scholarly publishing sector continues to be of utmost importance to the dissemination of Canadian research.

The Federation’s draft policy for the ASPP is:

The ASPP will actively support Open Access publishing of ASPP-funded books.

 

more...
No comment yet.