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OA in the UK : where the loophole is

OA in the UK : where the loophole is | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
From 1 April 2013, all academics funded by Research Councils UK (RCUK) need to be compliant with a new open access policy.

Via Bernard Rentier
Florence Piron's insight:
Bernard Rentier's insight: This is exactly and very clearly where the loophole is. Go down the left lane all the way to "are APC funds available from research funder?". Yes or no. • If no, go Green. Fine. • If yes, go Immediate Gold. What does it mean? Publishers interested in supporting Gold OA for profit are ready to use research money (funders money is research money) to ask for escalating prices in the "pay to say" process. This little loophole (that can easily go unnoticed) is what will of course ensure immediate open access quite efficiently but, at the same time, it will impose restricted publication capacity. Restricting publication capacity is fine if it is based on quality (there are way too many publications because of the "publish or perish" system) but certainly not if it is based on cost. OA has two goals: (1) broaden diffusion and (2) reduce costs. An "author (or funder) pays" mandate when Gold is available is dangerous without a strict price control.
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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:52 AM

This is exactly and very clearly where the loophole is.

Go down the left lane all the way to "are APC funds available from research funder?". Yes or no.

• If no, go Green. Fine.

• If yes, go Immediate Gold.

What does it mean? Publishers interested in supporting Gold OA for profit are ready to use research money (funders money is research money) to ask for escalating prices in the "pay to say" process.

This little loophole (that can easily go unnoticed) is what will of course ensure immediate open access quite efficiently but, at the same time, it will impose restricted publication capacity.

Restricting publication capacity is fine if it is based on quality (there are way too many publications because of the "publish or perish" system) but certainly not if it is based on cost.

OA has two goals: (1) broaden diffusion and (2) reduce costs. An "author (or funder) pays" mandate when Gold is available is dangerous without a strict price control.

 

Rachel H's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:46 AM

Useful commentary from Bernard Rentier

Science ouverte - Open science
Cinq thèmes sont suivis dans ce scoop.it : le libre accès (Open Access), la science citoyenne (citizen science), la science en ligne (Open Science), la science 2.0 et les cours en ligne gratuits (MOOCs).
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8 nature-focused projects for citizen scientists

8 nature-focused projects for citizen scientists | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Volunteers can lend a hand, from categorizing whale songs to planting sunflowers.
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Free Access to Science Research Doesn't Benefit Everyone

Free Access to Science Research Doesn't Benefit Everyone | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Open is better than closed. That rule applies for a lot of things: presents, beer, restaurants. And, many argue, science.

The open-science movement has a lot of interlocking parts. Open-access publishing advocates want papers to be available to anybody, open-data supporters want data to be downloadable, and those arguing for open source want the software scientists use to be shared with everyone. The idea is simple: The more people who have access to papers, data, and software, the better it is for the world.

And the drumbeat of openness is getting louder. Last month, CERN opened up its vast datasets to the public and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced that any research it funded would have to be published only in journals that offer open access. “We believe that published research resulting from our funding should be promptly and broadly disseminated,” they wrote in their policy statement.

There is a lot of promise in open access. But there are a lot of problems too.

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Digging deeper into the localness of participation in Sub-Saharan African Wikipedia content

Digging deeper into the localness of participation in Sub-Saharan African Wikipedia content | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The previous two posts about the geography of contributions to Wikipedia showed both the different types of local engagement that different regions have, and the primary reason that Sub-Saharan Afr...
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To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work

To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or “fanbase” and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.
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The Open Access Interviews: Dr Indrajit Banerjee, Director of UNESCO’s Knowledge Societies Division

The Open Access Interviews: Dr Indrajit Banerjee, Director of UNESCO’s Knowledge Societies Division | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The mission of UNESCO, which was founded in 1945, is to “contribute to the building of peace, the eradication of poverty, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue through education, the sciences, culture, communication and information.”
An important plank in that mission is a commitment to help build inclusive and equitable knowledge societies. We should not be surprised, therefore, that UNESCO supports the Open Access movement, we should not be surprised that it was the first UN agency to adopt an OA policy, and we should not be surprised that it now makes its own publications Open Access.
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The Battle for Open, by Martin weller

The Battle for Open, by Martin weller | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
With the success of open access publishing, Massive open online courses (MOOCs) and open education practices, the open approach to education has moved from the periphery to the mainstream. This marks a moment of victory for the open education movement, but at the same time the real battle for the direction of openness begins. As with the green movement, openness now has a market value and is subject to new tensions, such as venture capitalists funding MOOC companies. This is a crucial time for determining the future direction of open education.

In this volume, Martin Weller examines four key areas that have been central to the developments within open education: open access, MOOCs, open education resources and open scholarship. Exploring the tensions within these key arenas, he argues that ownership over the future direction of openness is significant to all those with an interest in education.
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Open access and the direction of travel in scholarly publishing

Open access and the direction of travel in scholarly publishing | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Recent moves by established journals to make research papers freely available signpost the direction of travel in academic publishing
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Biohackers, l’internationale des savants fous

Biohackers, l’internationale des savants fous | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Amateurs, étudiants ou chercheurs unissent leurs efforts dans une cinquantaine de labos de «biohacking» pour inventer une pile verte ou étudier des neurones de mouche.
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Propriété intellectuelle : géopolitique et mondialisation | Hervé Le Crosnier

Propriété intellectuelle : géopolitique et mondialisation

Conférence du 25 février 2014 : le domaine public et les enjeux de licence.

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How institutional repositories are already working to solve the Open Access problem

How institutional repositories are already working to solve the Open Access problem | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Last week, Mike Taylor discussed his concerns on institutional repositories as an adequate solution to the open access problem and asked Green OA advocates to address these problems. In response, Natalia MadjarevicDave Puplett, and Neil Stewart clarify the existing capabilities of institutional repositories and highlight the powerful transitional role they can play in providing greater access and benefits for individuals, institutions and disciplines.

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Le phénomène Wikipédia, par Christian Vandendorpe

Par Christian Vandendorpe

Tel qu’il est maintenant bien établi, ce projet permet de répondre aux besoins d’un monde où, les moyens de communication ayant aboli les distances, les échanges entre les cultures doivent pouvoir s’appuyer sur des outils multilingues et qui transcendent les frontières. Par la richesse de son contenu, son actualisation permanente et la souplesse de la formule copyleft, Wikipédia est d’ores et déjà au cœur de nombreux dispositifs essentiels à une meilleure appréhension de notre environnement. On en a déjà un exemple avec les mashups ou applications composites qui fusionnent des cartes de Google Earth avec des données géographiques de Wikipédia («geotag») : à terme, on peut s’attendre à ce que la totalité de la carte géographique soit intégrée à des notes de type encyclopédique. Devant le dynamisme de la version anglaise de Wikipédia – qui compte déjà plus de deux millions d’entrées –, il importe que le monde francophone investisse pleinement cet outil et contribue à le perfectionner, afin d’éviter une marginalisation de notre espace linguistique. En effet, tout comme l’ouvrage de Diderot et d’Alembert avait eu un impact considérable sur les mentalités du temps, il y a tout lieu de penser que Wikipédia contribuera de façon significative à modeler la culture virtuelle qui s’élabore en cette aube du XXIe siècle dans un monde globalisé.

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Négociations consortiales avec Elsevier... aux Pays-Bas

Négociations consortiales avec Elsevier... aux Pays-Bas | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Elsevier, éditeur international dont la maison mère se trouve aux Pays-Bas, fait beaucoup parler de lui en France dans le milieu académique : en cause, la négociation au niveau national d'un accord...
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Three Generations of Citizen Science: The Pioneer | Audubon Magazine

Three Generations of Citizen Science: The Pioneer | Audubon Magazine | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Fifty years after launching the breeding bird survey, 70 years after starting a career in bird conservation, and nearly 100 years after his birth, Chan Robbins is still watching closely.

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Open Access Policy Announced by Two Departments within India’s Ministry of Science and Technology

Open Access Policy Announced by Two Departments within India’s Ministry of Science and Technology | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Two departments within India’s Ministry of Science and Technology, the Department of Biotechnology (DBT) and the Department of Science and Technology (DST) have released a new Open Access Policy. Under the new policy, researchers who receive funding or use resources from from these departments can still publish in any journals they wish, but they will need to deposit copies of the final papers and supporting data in institutional repositories where the information can be accessed by the public:

 “The final accepted manuscript (after refereeing, revision, etc.) resulting from research projects, which are fully or partially funded by DBT or DST, or were performed using infrastructure built with the support of these organizations, should be deposited. This also includes review articles, both invited and author initiated, for those who received funding from DBT or DST during that period. The full-text of the paper, metadata and supplementary materials should be deposited. At the end of the full-text the acknowledgement should carry the grant number.”

Researchers must deposit their works in the repositories within two weeks of acceptance by a journal, but if the journal requires an embargo, the repository will not make the paper available until the embargo ends.  The Open Access Policy makes clear, however, that “the essence of the policy is to enhance public exposure of the research… expeditiously.” It recommends a maximum embargo of six months for science, technology and medicine papers, and twelve months for arts, humanities, and social science papers.

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Analysis of Economic Issues Related to Open Access to Scientific Publications

Analysis of Economic Issues Related to Open Access to Scientific Publications | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
FOSTER aims to facilitate open science by training researchers about open access and open data.
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Gates’ strict open access policy may have domino effect

Gates’ strict open access policy may have domino effect | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
The Gates Foundation’s new rules may prompt other development research funders to move in a similar direction.
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Les MOOC francophones en un coup d'oeil

Les MOOC francophones en un coup d'oeil | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Sur MOOC Francophone, retrouvez désormais chaque trimestre le bilan de santé des MOOC en français
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Digital Publishing – Experimentation

Digital Publishing – Experimentation | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
This post is one of a series from participants in the Innovation in Digital Publishing in the Humanities session at the American Historical Association 2015 Annual Meeting in New York, co-presented...
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Open Content-a Practical Guide to Using Creative Commons Licences

Open Content-a Practical Guide to Using Creative Commons Licences | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Released November 24
Made available by UNESCO, Wikimedia Deutschland, and HBZ Library Services.
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Adam Hyde, PLOS, on YouTube : How to produce Open Science

In his talk on "Open Access and Standards" at Books in Browsers, Adam Hyde argued that HTML should be the standard format for academic and scholarly publishi...
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Why Isn't Academic Research Free to Everyone?

Why Isn't Academic Research Free to Everyone? | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
Scholarly articles, filled with indubitable knowledge and analysis, only exist for the general public behind pricey paywalls. So one lecturer is advocating for them to be free of charge.
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Comment, discuss, review: An essential guide to post-publication review sites.

Comment, discuss, review: An essential guide to post-publication review sites. | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Andy Tattersall continues his discussion of post-publication peer review and provides an overview of the main tools and sites, from publisher platforms to independent forums, offering some kind of comment, discussion or review system for scholarly content.

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L’édition à l’ère du numérique : un nouveau contrat d’auteur en France

L’édition à l’ère du numérique : un nouveau contrat d’auteur en France | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it

Le Journal Officiel a publié le 13 novembre l’ordonnance n° 2014-1348 "modifiant les dispositions du code de la propriété intellectuelle (CPI) relatives au contrat d’édition".
Fruit de discussions entre le Conseil permanent des écrivains (CPE) et le Syndicat national de l’édition (SNE), ce texte stipule que le nouveau contrat d’auteur entrera en vigueur à partir du 1er décembre 2014. L’ordonnance n° 2014-1348 est disponible en ligne sur Legifrance.fr.
Un compte rendu du Gouvernement annonce les grands principes de ce nouveau contrat d’auteur dont l’objectif est de tenir compte de l’édition numérique : "Les nouvelles dispositions définissent l’étendue de l’obligation qui pèse sur l’éditeur en matière d’exploitation permanente et suivie, et de reddition des comptes pour l’édition imprimée et pour l’édition numérique. Elles garantissent également une juste rémunération de l’auteur en cas d’exploitation numérique. Les conditions économiques de la cession des droits numériques feront l’objet d’un réexamen régulier, afin de tenir compte de l’évolution des modèles économiques de diffusion numérique La réforme prévoit la possibilité pour l’auteur ou l’éditeur de mettre fin au contrat d’édition en cas de constat d’un défaut durable d’activité économique dans l’exploitation de l’œuvre."

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Planet Open Knowledge Foundation

This site pulls together updates from a variety of blogs which cover the Open Knowledge Foundation’s blogs and working groups.
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State of California Leads on Open Access to Publicly Funded Research

State of California Leads on Open Access to Publicly Funded Research | Science ouverte - Open science | Scoop.it
California has become the first state to mandate open access for the products of some taxpayer-funded research. On September 29 Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act, coauthored by Assemblyman Brian Nestande (R–Palm Desert) and Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D–Los Angeles). AB 609, as the bill is known, ensures that those who stand to benefit most from state-funded research, such as healthcare providers, students and professors, biotech prof
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