Fitness, Health, and Wellness
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Fitness, Health, and Wellness
This collection includes articles related to Fitness, Health, and Wellness. For a collection with resources for teaching Health Education, visit http://bit.ly/youth_health and for additional Educator Resource Collections, check out http://EduResearcher.com
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Exercise and the Ever-Smarter Human Brain

Exercise and the Ever-Smarter Human Brain | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Gretchen Reynolds (New York Times Wellness Blog)

"Our brains were shaped and sharpened by movement, an emerging view of human evolution goes, and we continue to require regular physical activity in order for our brains to function optimally."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/exercise-and-the-ever-smarter-human-brain/?_r=0&nbsp

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

No More Sneaking Sugar into Packaged Foods // UCLA

No More Sneaking Sugar into Packaged Foods // UCLA | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"The iconic black-and-white Nutrition Facts label you find on packaged foods in the United States is getting its first makeover in two decades. The federal government decided last month to update the food label beginning in 2018 by listing how much sugar has been added to a product.

The current label lumps added sugar with naturally occurring sugars in the foods themselves, which is a deceptive practice, said Dr. John Swartzberg, a UC Berkeley clinical professor emeritus and editorial board chair of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. So listing added sugar “will hopefully guide people away from consuming products with a lot of added sugar,” he said.

With the label change, consumers will be very surprised to see the percentage of daily value of added sugar, for example, in one soda drink, said Michael Roberts, executive director of the UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy and UC Global Food Initiative subcommittee member.

 

“Time will tell whether this information changes human behavior, i.e., consuming less soda,” Roberts said. “To be fair, sugar pops up everywhere, not just soda, so the impact that these changes will have on consumers and manufacturers will be interesting to watch.”

UC food experts praise the labeling changes and offer some key takeaways to consumers.

Listing added sugar is the most important label change

 

The new label will list the amount of added sugar in a product, both in grams and as a percentage of the daily recommended allowance.

 

Added sugar — any sugar added in the preparation of foods such as table sugar, high fructose corn syrup and others — can be found in hundreds of products such as cereal, yogurt, pasta sauce and salad dressing. But the biggest source is sugar-sweetened beverages, which account for nearly half of Americans’ intake of added sugar. One 20-ounce soda will take you over the recommended amount of sugar for an entire day, said Pat Crawford, senior director of research for the Nutrition Policy Institute of UC’s division of agriculture and natural resources.

 

“The new label will allow people to reasonably see what they’re doing when they’re consuming high-sugar products,” Crawford said.

 

Americans need to consume less sugar

More than one out of three adults in the United States is obese. Nearly half of U.S. adults have prediabetes or diabetes, raising their risk of heart attacks, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. Among U.S. children, more than one in six is obese, and diabetes and prediabetes rates are rising. Amid these alarming statistics, there’s a growing concern about too much added sugar in diets.

 

“It’s important to give the public the information they need in order to modify their diets,” Crawford said. “We are now finding significant effects on diabetes and heart disease rates for those who regularly consume sugary beverages. A large study of women over an eight-year period found that the risk of diabetes among women who consumed one or more servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day was nearly double the risk among women who consumed less than one serving per month. Further, drinking one 12-ounce soda a day increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality by almost one-third.”...

 

For full post, please visit: http://newsroom.ucla.edu/stories/no-more-sneaking-sugar-into-packaged-foods 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

"Got a Minute? Let's Work Out" // NYTimes Wellness

"Got a Minute? Let's Work Out" // NYTimes Wellness | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Gretchen Reynolds (New York Times Wellness Blog; Getty Images)

"For years, I’ve been writing about the benefits of short bursts of exercise. Studies and anecdotes suggest that 10 minutes, seven minutes, six minutes, or even four minutes of very hard exercise interspersed with periods of rest can lead to a robust improvement in fitness. But I suspect that this column is the least amount of exercise I will ever write about.

 

According to a lovely new study, a single minute of intense exercise, embedded within an otherwise easy 10-minute workout, can improve fitness and health. Just one minute."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/12/10/one-minute-workout/

 

For link to the original study:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0111489

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

EMF, Wireless Radiation, & Screen Time Research

EMF, Wireless Radiation, & Screen Time Research | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

This collection includes research, updates, and resources related to EMF/RF Radiation and screen time.  For useful websites with extensive documents for safe technology advocacy, please visit the National Association for Children and Safe Technology (http://nacst.org), the Environmental Health Trust (http://ehtrust.org) and EMR Safety (http://SaferEmr.com). For additional resources and updates in Education, please visit http://eduresearcher.com.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

BabySafe Project // The Science

BabySafe Project // The Science | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"Radio frequency waves have been used for more than a hundred years to carry signals from transmitting towers to distant receivers. This technology has informed and entertained millions of people around the world. However, the technology offered today by the wireless industry puts powerful transmitters as well as receivers much closer to users of all ages than ever before. This two-way communication, and the increased radiation needed to support it, is reason for concern. Indeed, manufacturers of wireless devices warn consumers to keep their phones, tablets, baby monitors or other devices away from their bodies. Consumer demand for connectivity everywhere has resulted in the installation of many more powerful local wireless transmitters and receivers, and now hundreds of thousands of rooftop, pole-mounted and tower transmitters (antennas) are placed in close proximity to private homes, apartments, schools, office buildings, retail and recreation areas.


“Free WiFi” is commonly advertised to attract customers at bars, restaurants, hotels and coffee shops. Wireless routers in public spaces are very powerful because they are intended to power many laptops or tablets simultaneously. This ubiquitous and ever-growing wireless world that we live in means that wireless radiation is all around us. But you can still make some personal choices that can reduce your exposure. As mentioned previously, keeping a safe distance from transmitters or antennas and keeping your personal wireless devices away from your body is relatively easy to do. The amount of time you spend using wireless devices is also important. Remember that exposure adds up over time."...


For full post and main website: 

http://www.babysafeproject.org/the-science/ 


Download Free Brochure: 

http://www.babysafeproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/BabySafe-Project-Booklet.pdf 


Descargue el Folleto Gratuito
Lo que usted necesita saber sobre la radiación inalámbrica y su bebé


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology // Joan Ganz Cooney Center

Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology // Joan Ganz Cooney Center | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"The world of parenting has changed.  In 1980, parents had home phones without answering machines, televisions without remote controls, cars without screens, and maybe if they had older children they owned an Atari video game console. Today, toddlers tell parents to “google it” when they can’t answer one of their million “why” questions, there are 24-hour cable channels created just for infants and toddlers, video game systems that read your body movements, and people carry mini-computers (smartphones) in their pockets that allow them to call friends, email co-workers, search the Internet, and download age-appropriate games for their child to play on the go. 

 

The technological boom has impacted us all, but how has it influenced parents?  This was the main question behind the nationally representative survey of over 2300 parents of children under age 8. In a report titledParenting in the Age of Digital Technology, which was released on June 4, 2013 in Washington, DC, we examined the details and intricacies of parenting young children in an age in which technology and media are increasingly mobile, accessible, and constantly available.

 

This survey recognized that children spend substantial amounts of time with media including television, computers, and mobile devices and rather than focusing solely on child screen time, this survey sought to understand the role of the parents in creating the home media environment in which children are being raised today."...

 

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/2013/06/06/parenting-in-the-age-of-digital-technology/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Health Education Resources
Scoop.it!

Exercise builds brawn… and brain power

Exercise builds brawn… and brain power | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
Exercise tones the legs, builds bigger biceps and strengthens the heart. But of all the body parts that benefit from a good workout, the brain may be the big winner.

 

http://www.gulf-times.com/opinion/189/details/439577/exercise-builds-brawn%26hellip-and-brain-power

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Penn Research Points to Omega-3 As An Intervention for Childhood Behavioral Problems

Penn Research Points to Omega-3 As An Intervention for Childhood Behavioral Problems | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
A new study by Penn researchers now suggests that omega-3, a fatty acid commonly found in fish oil, may have long-term neurodevelopmental effects that ultimately reduce antisocial and aggressive behavior problems in children.

 

 

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-05/uop-prp051515.php#

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Correlation Between Sleep Loss and Mental Health Problems in Children

Correlation Between Sleep Loss and Mental Health Problems in Children | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
According to a new study, four year old children with sleep disorders have higher risks of developing psychiatric problems during later childhood.

 

http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-mental-health-children-2034/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Nutrition and Cognitive Achievement: An Evaluation of the School Breakfast Program

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047272714002497

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying // KQED MindShift

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying // KQED MindShift | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz (KQED)

Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students’ belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam will lead to higher scores, truth is, the need for a good night’s rest is even more important than finishing homework or studying for a test.

 

A recent study in the journal Child Development showed that sacrificing sleep in order to study will actually backfire. The study followed 535 Los Angeles high school students for 14 days, tracking how long they slept, as well as how well they understood material being taught in class and how they performed on a test, quiz, or homework.

 

“Although the researchers expected that extra hours of studying that ate into sleep time might create problems in terms of students’ understanding of what they were taught in class, they were surprised to find that diminishing sleep in order to study was actually associated with doing more poorly on a test, quiz, or homework,” Science Daily wrote.

 

“Reduced sleep … accounts for the increase in academic problems that occurs after days of increased studying,” said UCLA scientist Andrew Fuligni. “Although these nights of extra studying may seem necessary, they can come at a cost.”

 

In another study by a research team at the University of York, researchers found that sleep even helps boost language acquisition skills in young children. “Children’s ability to recall and recognize new words improved approximately 12 hours after training, but only if sleep occurs,” said Dr. Lisa Henderson, a lead researcher on the study. “The key effects were maintained one week later, suggesting that these new words are retained in long-term memory.” The study, published in Developmental Science, shows that when they sleep enough, children show the same learning patterns as adults."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/01/why-sleeping-may-be-more-important-than-studying/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Kelly McGonigal: How to Make Stress Your Friend // TED.com

"Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat. But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case."
http://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_mcgonigal_how_to_make_stress_your_friend.html
 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

McDonald’s to Close 700 Locations as Global Sales Slide // RT.com

McDonald’s to Close 700 Locations as Global Sales Slide // RT.com | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"In the US, the closings will be a mix of franchises and company-owned restaurants, McDonald’s spokesperson Becca Hary told the Associated Press. She said the closings are part of a strategic review intended to set the stage for future growth, but the reduction “would be minimal” in light of its total 14,300 locations in the US.

While the specific number and locations of the US closures hasn’t been revealed, McDonald’s did disclose in April that they would trim hundreds of restaurants worldwide from their balance sheet. The closures include 350 restaurants in the China, Japan and the US, in addition to 350 that have already been closed.


READ MORE: McDonald's to stop announcing monthly sales as profits plummet

The company’s global comparison sales report for May showed that sales had increased 2.3 percent in Europe but declined in the US by 0.2 percent and by 3.2 percent in the Asia/Pacific/Middle East/Africa markets. The company’s president and CEO, Steve Easterbrook, said at the time of the sales report that McDonald’s has “embarked on a turnaround plan to reignite our business performance” through “great-tasting, high-quality food, compelling value and outstanding service.”

McDonald’s restaurants have been closed before if they were underperforming, but previously the number of closings has been outweighed by restaurant openings. The company did say they plan to open 300 new restaurants globally, but that won’t be enough to counteract a contraction that is seen as emblematic of current troubles at the Golden Arches, which is trying to regroup."
 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.rt.com/usa/268225-mcdonalds-closing-700-locations/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

InfoAboutKids.org

InfoAboutKids.org | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
Infoaboutkids.org is an ongoing collaboration of the Consortium for Science-Based Information on Children, Youth and Families. Our goal is to promote healthy child and family development by highlighting science-based information for those who care for, or work with, children. Our site, updated quarterly, links to other well-established, trustworthy websites for parents and professionals. Our monthly blogs will summarize science-based information on timely topics.

 

http://www.infoaboutkids.org/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain? // NY Times Wellness 

Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain? // NY Times Wellness  | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Gretchen Reynolds

"Some forms of exercise may be much more effective than others at bulking up the brain, according to a remarkable new study in rats. For the first time, scientists compared head-to-head the neurological impacts of different types of exercise: running, weight training and high-intensity interval training. The surprising results suggest that going hard may not be the best option for long-term brain health.


As I have often written, exercise changes the structure and function of the brain. Studies in animals and people have shown that physical activity generally increases brain volume and can reduce the number and size of age-related holes in the brain’s white and gray matter.


Exercise also, and perhaps most resonantly, augments adult neurogenesis, which is the creation of new brain cells in an already mature brain. In studies with animals, exercise, in the form of running wheels or treadmills, has been found to double or even triple the number of new neurons that appear afterward in the animals’ hippocampus, a key area of the brain for learning and memory, compared to the brains of animals that remain sedentary. Scientists believe that exercise has similar impacts on the human hippocampus."... 

 

 

For full post, click here: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/17/which-type-of-exercise-is-best-for-the-brain/?smid=fb-share 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Myth of "Choice": How Junk-Food Marketers Target Our Kids // Anna Lappé & Food MythBusters

For more information click on video or visit http://www.foodmyths.org 

 

[For those who see the uncanny similarities to issues in the school "choice" movement, check out the following collection: http://bit.ly/chart_look. It may well have a parallel title to the one above: "The Myth of 'School Choice': How Corporate-Charter Marketers Target our Kids (and Parents).]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Right Dose of Exercise for a Longer Life // NYTimes Wellness Blog

The Right Dose of Exercise for a Longer Life // NYTimes Wellness Blog | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Gretchen Reynolds
"Exercise has had a Goldilocks problem, with experts debating just how much exercise is too little, too much or just the right amount to improve health and longevity. Two new, impressively large-scale studies provide some clarity, suggesting that the ideal dose of exercise for a long life is a bit more than many of us currently believe we should get, but less than many of us might expect. The studies also found that prolonged or intense exercise is unlikely to be harmful and could add years to people’s lives.

 

No one doubts, of course, that any amount of exercise is better than none. Like medicine, exercise is known to reduce risks for many diseases and premature death.

 

But unlike medicine, exercise does not come with dosing instructions. The current broad guidelines from governmental and health organizations call for 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week to build and maintain health and fitness.

 

But whether that amount of exercise represents the least amount that someone should do — the minimum recommended dose — or the ideal amount has not been certain.

 

Scientists also have not known whether there is a safe upper limit on exercise, beyond which its effects become potentially dangerous; and whether some intensities of exercise are more effective than others at prolonging lives.

 

So the new studies, both of which were published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine, helpfully tackle those questions.

 

In the broader of the two studies, researchers with the National Cancer Institute, Harvard University and other institutions gathered and pooled data about people’s exercise habits from six large, ongoing health surveys, winding up with information about more than 661,000 adults, most of them middle-aged.

 

Using this data, the researchers stratified the adults by their weekly exercise time, from those who did not exercise at all to those who worked out for 10 times the current recommendations or more (meaning that they exercised moderately for 25 hours per week or more).

 

Then they compared 14 years’ worth of death records for the group.

They found that, unsurprisingly, the people who did not exercise at all were at the highest risk of early death.

 

But those who exercised a little, not meeting the recommendations but doing something, lowered their risk of premature death by 20 percent.

 

Those who met the guidelines precisely, completing 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, enjoyed greater longevity benefits and 31 percent less risk of dying during the 14-year period compared with those who never exercised.

 

The sweet spot for exercise benefits, however, came among those who tripled the recommended level of exercise, working out moderately, mostly by walking, for 450 minutes per week, or a little more than an hour per day. Those people were 39 percent less likely to die prematurely than people who never exercised."...

 

For full post, please click on title above or here: 
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/15/the-right-dose-of-exercise-for-a-longer-life/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Parents Struggle to Balance Screen Time Rules With Digital Homework // KQED MindShift

Parents Struggle to Balance Screen Time Rules With Digital Homework // KQED MindShift | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz // KQED MindShift

As technology becomes a more common feature of classrooms and computer-based testing becomes the norm, even the youngest learners are being pushed to master keyboarding and computing skills. But what does it feel like for a kindergartener, whose family has faithfully followed the American Academy of Pediatric’s suggestions to limit screen time, to arrive at school and immediately be assessed on a computer?

 

In her PBS MediaShift essay, Jenny Shank describes the tensions emerging between parents with low-tech child rearing styles, teachers frantically trying to prepare students for computer-based tests that could determine the future of their careers, and districts following the latest trends. Shank’s essay gives voice to that “stuck in the middle” feeling when a parent supports the idea of technology integration in school generally, but isn’t sure she thinks it’s being done well.

 

Shank writes: “I’m all for teaching kids about technology, which will be a part of their personal and work lives forever. But shouldn’t they learn how to write software programs rather than how to scan a text and answer multiple-choice questions on a screen? Shouldn’t they learn about how to assemble computer hardware, build an object with a 3-D printer, or shoot and edit digital video footage rather than passively watch as a computer reads them a book? Many studies suggest that when people read on a screen rather than paper, they read less attentively and retain less. So why aren’t schools using computers for what these machines are actually good at instead?”...

 

For linked post, click on title above or here: http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/03/15/parents-struggle-to-balance-screen-time-rules-with-digital-homework/

 

For the PBS MediaShift essay referred to in the text above, visit here: 

http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2015/03/how-to-unplug-your-kids-despite-schools-pushing-tech-with-common-core/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Our Cultural Addiction To Phones, In One Disconcerting Video

Our Cultural Addiction To Phones, In One Disconcerting Video | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
A funny and disconcerting short film, I Forgot My Phone, gives us a sense of just how much our smartphones have changed life experiences — and probably not for the better.

 

For full post, click on title above. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Junk Food: From Confusion, to Clear and Simple Truth // Dr. David Katz

Junk Food: From Confusion, to Clear and Simple Truth // Dr. David Katz | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/junk-food-from-confusion-clear-simple-truth-david 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Battle Over School Recess

The Battle Over School Recess | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it
Some Florida parents are fighting for their child’s right to recess. Twenty-three elementary schools in Orange County, Florida, have been cutting back on recess, and even canceling it altogether to maximize class time. In a recent Orange County School Board meeting, parents asked that recess time be enforced in all local schools for all students.

 

 

http://www.today.com/health/should-elementary-schools-have-recess-some-florida-parents-fight-break-1D80423842

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Inactivity and the Brain: Why Exercise is More Important than Ever // The Buffer Blog

Inactivity and the Brain: Why Exercise is More Important than Ever // The Buffer Blog | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Belle Beth Cooper
I know exercise is good for me. I know it’s important for my health and happiness and that it’s necessary for general fitness. That part’s easy — we hear about how we should exercise more all the time.

 

What I didn’t realize was how being inactive is really detrimental to the brain and body. I didn’t understand all of the specific ways regular activity can be beneficial, either.


With a little digging around, I found some research that made me realize there’s much more to exercising than just getting fit.

Inactivity changes our brain structure – literally

First, the bad news. If you’re living a sedentary lifestyle, which more of us are prone to doing as technology takes away physical barriers for our work, you could be increasing your risk of heart disease. You may have even heard this before, since it’s fairly common knowledge that regular physical activity can reduce the risk of heart disease — what’s new in recent research are clues to exactly how this links might work."...

 

https://blog.bufferapp.com/inactivity-and-the-brain-why-exercise-is-more-important-than-ever

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Got Water? // The Mind Unleashed

Got Water? // The Mind Unleashed | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"Adverse effects from not drinking enough water include digestive, skin, bladder and kidney problems, fatigue, and even headaches. We need water as much as the air we breathe in! Keeping your body hydrated is not a joke.

 

Did you know that dehydration actually sets in just before you start feeling thirsty? Sipping water throughout the day is the best way to handle it. Always have a bottle or a glass of water handy! If you’re not a morning person, having two glasses of water right after you wake up will boost up your blood pressure to normal levels, and it’s way healthier than having your first coffee on an empty stomach.


Many of us believe that merely drinking fluids like sweetened juices, soda or tea will hydrate you as well as water does. This is not true. It’s actually the opposite! To deal with the excess sugar and salt you are taking in your body wastes immense amounts of precious water just to clean it out from your system. And if you love your coffee, make sure to drink one extra glass of water for every cup you have."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://themindunleashed.org/2014/09/11-reasons-dehydration-making-sick-fat.html

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Workplace Stress Responsible For Up To $190 Billion In Annual U.S. Healthcare Costs // Forbes

Workplace Stress Responsible For Up To $190 Billion In Annual U.S. Healthcare Costs // Forbes | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Michael Blanding
"Our work can literally make us sick. Long hours, impossible demands from bosses, and uncertain job security can take their toll on our mental and physical well-being, leading to stress-induced aches and pains and anxiety. In extreme cases, the consequences can be worse—heart disease, high blood pressure, alcoholism, mental illness.
 

Even so, the connections between job pressures and health—and what management can do to address the problem—have been little studied.
 

“We have this body of research that shows workplace stress is very bad for health, and we have this other information that says our health costs are way above that of other countries,” says Joel Goh, Harvard Business School assistant professor of business administration in the Technology and Operations Management unit.

 

“But traditionally in the US we have not placed a lot of emphasis on the role of workplace stress in the high cost of health care.”

In recent years, General Motors spent more on health care than it did on steel, and across the country, companies are struggling to find affordable plans for their workers, in some cases dropping health coverage or raising premiums on employees in order to combat escalating costs. On the other hand, companies are implementing health programs in an effort to keep workers healthy—and productive.

 

But those programs can only work if companies aren’t at the same time undermining them with stress-inducing management practices."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/hbsworkingknowledge/2015/01/26/workplace-stress-responsible-for-up-to-190-billion-in-annual-u-s-heathcare-costs/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

A 12-Hour Window for a Healthy Weight // NYTimes Wellness Blog

A 12-Hour Window for a Healthy Weight // NYTimes Wellness Blog | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

By Gretchen Reynolds (Illustration by Ben Wisesman) 
 

"Scientists, like mothers, have long suspected that midnight snacking is inadvisable. But until a few years ago, there was little in the way of science behind those suspicions. Now, a new study shows that mice prevented from eating at all hours avoided obesity and metabolic problems — even if their diet was sometimes unhealthful.

Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego and elsewhere began experimenting with the eating patterns of laboratory mice in a previous study. On that occasion, some mice consumed high-fat food whenever they wanted; others had the same diet but could eat only during an eight-hour window. None exercised. The mice that ate at all hours soon grew chubby and unwell, with symptoms of diabetes. But the mice on the eight-hour schedule gained little weight and developed no metabolic problems. Those results were published in 2012.

 

For the new study, which appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism in December, Salk scientists fed groups of adult males one of four diets: high-fat, high-fructose, high-fat and high-sucrose, and regular mouse kibble. Some of the mice in each dietary group were allowed to eat whenever they wanted throughout their waking hours; others were restricted to feeding periods of nine, 12 or 15 hours. The caloric intake for all the mice was the same.

 

Over the course of the 38-week experiment, some of the mice in the time-restricted groups were allowed to cheat on weekends and eat whenever they chose. A few of the eat-anytime mice were shifted to the restricted windows midway through the study. By the end, the mice eating at all hours were generally obese and metabolically ill, reproducing the results of the earlier study. But those mice that ate within a nine- or 12-hour window remained sleek and healthy, even if they cheated occasionally on weekends. What’s more, mice that were switched out of an eat-anytime schedule lost some of the weight they had gained.

 

“Time-restricted eating didn’t just prevent but also reversed obesity,” says Satchidananda Panda, an associate professor at the Salk Institute who oversaw the studies. “That was exciting to see.” Mice that consumed regular kibble in fixed time periods also had less body fat than those that ate the same food whenever they chose."...

 

For the full article, click on title above or here:
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/15/a-12-hour-window-for-a-healthy-weight/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The New Power Circuit: How to Strength Train for Major Results // Fitness

The New Power Circuit: How to Strength Train for Major Results // Fitness | Fitness, Health, and Wellness | Scoop.it

"When you imagine a state-of-the-art gym — one that's outfitted with the most innovative equipment — what do you envision? A gleaming, Olympic-style lab with sci-fi-like exercise contraptions that have been crafted by NASA engineers?

 

Try a padded room with ropes, medicine balls and boxes, where the weight machines you grew up with have been all but weeded out. Gyms, like sneakers, are having a minimalist moment, and they're taking the training wheels off your workout tools. The age of surfing your way through a circuit of strength machines has given way to a new mode of DIY lifting and lunging that science says will make you tighter and stronger in less time.

 

And the best part: It's easier than ever to get the kind of cutting-edge workouts going on right now at the most elite gyms, even if you're not a member at any. Here's why."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/workout/tips/best-strength-training-tips/

more...
No comment yet.