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The Socratic questioning process. How criticism and critical are not the same.

The Socratic questioning process. How criticism and critical are not the same. | Science News | Scoop.it

Via Dennis T OConnor
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

A good reminder of an old skill set

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Overarcher's curator insight, July 9, 2013 11:55 PM

socratic questioning in pictures, love it!

Maria Persson's comment, July 11, 2013 3:15 PM
My daily life at work and play so often involves Socratic questioning - I never get bored and constantly on a learning curve! Thanks for sharing this great resource!
Margarita Parra's comment, July 22, 2013 7:01 PM
There is an approach to solving a problem, by Guy Brousseau. It looks much like this process.And it works!
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Infographic: The Decline of STEM Education in the U.S. - Getting Smart by Getting Smart Staff - EdTech, mathchat, STEM

Infographic: The Decline of STEM Education in the U.S. - Getting Smart by Getting Smart Staff - EdTech, mathchat, STEM | Science News | Scoop.it
A focus in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) began officially with the launch of Sputnik 1 October 4, 1957. This launched the beginning of NASA and government-mandated funding for students interested in STEM careers.
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

A compelling argument for a coordinated approach and increased investment in science and technology skills.

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Qld science students in sharp decline - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Qld science students in sharp decline - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Science News | Scoop.it
The Queensland Institute of Medical Research is hoping a program designed to give students a hands-on science experience will attract them to a career in the field.
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How an ocean went into hiding in Australia - environment - 20 August 2013 - New Scientist

How an ocean went into hiding in Australia - environment - 20 August 2013 - New Scientist | Science News | Scoop.it
A climate triple whammy meant that a chunk of ocean took a wrong turn in 2011 – so much water got locked in Australia that global sea levels plummeted
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

A fascinating detail in the climate story.

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How TO Host A Scoopit Newsletter / Landingpage FREE on Google Drive

How TO Host A Scoopit Newsletter / Landingpage FREE on Google Drive | Science News | Scoop.it

Via Ally Greer, Dennis T OConnor
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 16, 2013 5:26 AM
Found A Cool Use for Scoop.it's new Newsletter feature. It is easy to create a content landing page and host it free with Google Drive.

Here's How...

1. Create a newsletter using the Manage > Create A Newsletter

2. Download as a Zip file. Open the Zip file.

3. Upload the HTML file to your Google drive into a public folder.

4. Click on the HTML file. A window pops up, click on OPEN in lower right corner.

5. Click on preview. Copy the URL that appears in the browser window:
https://googledrive.com/host/0B0eG3a8zValDQjl6aldwQlJMNDg/email%203.html ;
Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:42 AM
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Found A Cool Use for Scoop.it's new Newsletter feature. It is easy to create a content landing page and host it free with Google Drive. 

Here's How...

1. Create a newsletter using the Manage > Create A Newsletter

 

2. Download as a Zip file. Open the Zip file.

 

3. Upload the HTML file to your Google drive into a public folder.

 

4. Click on the HTML file. A window pops up, click on OPEN in lower right corner. 

 

5. Click on preview. Copy the URL that appears in the browser window:

https://googledrive.com/host/0B0eG3a8zValDQjl6aldwQlJMNDg/email%203.html ;

Next figuring out how to add a Call To Action and subscription code.  BTW, Unbounce charges $700 a year to host landing pages :). 

 

Also works on DropBox. 

The Free Alternative
The interesting question is could you create a web marketing business with NO money for websites or blogs? Yes is the answer to that question. By using free tools such as Google Drive, Scoop.it and Blogger or WordPress you could create a business without paying anything to web development. 

You might find that business is limited in scale, but so what. Your cost is  limited to your sweat equity to create a revenue stream and THEN buy the website improvements you need to go to the next level. I just build a MagentoGo store (Story of Cancer Store: http://storyofcancer.gostorego.com/ ;) and the same thing is ALMOST true for Ecom.

 

Between Storify, Volusion and Magento you can create a store for sweat equity + $500 (give or take). My little store has already made $130 inside of its first month so well on its way to paying for its serving costs. 

The ultimate lesson of crowdfunding and crowdsourcing is DO NOTHING until it is worth the investment to do so :). 

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Online Content Curation Master Class with Robin Good: TheNextWeb Academy

Online Content Curation Master Class with Robin Good: TheNextWeb Academy | Science News | Scoop.it

 

 


Via Robin Good, Guillaume Decugis, Dennis T OConnor
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Robin Good's comment, July 6, 2013 1:18 PM
Thanks a lot Ken, very much appreciated indeed. :-)
Robin Good's comment, July 6, 2013 1:18 PM
Thank you Dennis T., you are too kind.
John Poole's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:57 AM

Rich source of intelligence on curation

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The past tense of open badges

The past tense of open badges | Science News | Scoop.it
Some commentators are heralding open badges as the nemesis of the college degree. I don't quite see it that way. It is true they are uneasy bedfellows. As Mark Smithers observes... "It's interestin...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Dennis T OConnor
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New forensic technique for estimating time of death by checking internal clock of the human brain

New forensic technique for estimating time of death by checking internal clock of the human brain | Science News | Scoop.it
People with severe depression have a disrupted “biological clock” that makes it seem as if they are living in a different time zone to the rest of the healthy population living alongside them, a study has found.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Fascinating

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Privacy protections needed? The genome hacker shows how individuals can be identified from 'anonymous' DNA

Privacy protections needed? The genome hacker shows how individuals can be identified from 'anonymous' DNA | Science News | Scoop.it

Late at night, a video camera captures a man striding up to the locked door of the information-technology department of a major Israeli bank. At this hour, access can be granted only by a fingerprint reader — but instead of using the machine, the man pushes a button on the intercom to ring the receptionist's phone. As it rings, he holds his mobile phone up to the intercom and presses the number 8. The sound of the keypad tone is enough to unlock the door. As he opens it, the man looks back to the camera with a shrug: that was easy.

 

Yaniv Erlich — the star of this 2006 video — considers this one of his favourite hacks. Technically a “penetration exercise” conducted to expose the bank's vulnerabilities, it was one of several projects that Erlich worked on during a two-year stint with a security firm based near Tel Aviv. Since then, the 33-year-old computational biologist has been bringing his hacker ethos to biology. Now at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he is using genome data in new ways, and in the process exposing vulnerabilities in databases that hold sensitive information on thousands of individuals around the world.

 

In a study published in January, Erlich's lab showed that it is possible to discover the identities of people who participate in genetic research studies by cross-referencing their data with publicly available information. Previous studies had shown that people listed in anonymous genetic data stores could be unmasked by matching their data to a sample of their DNA. But Erlich showed that all it requires is an Internet connection.

 

Erlich's work has exposed a pressing ethical quandary. As researchers increasingly combine patient data with other types of information — everything from social-media posts to entries on genealogy websites — protecting anonymity becomes next to impossible. Studying these linked data has its benefits, but it may also reveal genetic and medical information that researchers had promised to keep private — and that, if made public, might hurt people's employability, insurability or even personal relationships.

 

Such revelations may make the scientific community uncomfortable and undermine the public's trust in medical research. But Erlich and his colleagues see their work as a way to alert the world about flawed systems, keep researchers honest and ultimately strengthen science. In March, for instance, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, claimed that the genome sequence that it had published for the HeLa cell line would not reveal anything about Henrietta Lacks — the source of the cells — or her descendants. Erlich issued a tart response: “Nice lie EMBL!” he tweeted. The sequence was later pulled from public databases, and the EMBL admitted that it would indeed be possible to glean information about the Lacks family from it, even though much of the HeLa genetic data had already been published as part of other studies.

 

“Most scientists would not go anywhere close to these questions, out of a sense of what it might mean for the field, or for them personally,” says David Page, director of the Whitehead Institute, who has advised Erlich about his research. “But this is not about publicity-seeking — this is about fearlessness, and a kind of interest in how all the parts of the Universe fit together that mark all of Yaniv's work.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Carrots that stick: Rethinking pleasure and pain as human motivators

Carrots that stick: Rethinking pleasure and pain as human motivators | Science News | Scoop.it
Social psychologist Prof E. Tory Higgins discusses his model of how humans interpret and appreciate reward and punishment, and offers unusual approaches to motivate people to action. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.
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17 Essential Reasons to Eat Organic Food

17 Essential Reasons to Eat Organic Food | Science News | Scoop.it
Discover 17 reasons why it is essential to eat organic--by the editor of HealthySurvivalist.com and best-selling author, Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD.
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Man gets 3D-printed face

Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

Very exciting how rapidly this technology is advancing. There will be more about this kind of capability at the next Brisbane Cafe Scientifique on April 16.

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Reserve to keep at-risk sharks safe

Reserve to keep at-risk sharks safe | Science News | Scoop.it
A TOWNSVILLE scientist who will lead a panel of the world's shark experts says the Coral Sea marine reserve is a great step forward to conserving endangered shark species.
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New head and neck cancer therapy

New head and neck cancer therapy | Science News | Scoop.it
Researchers at The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute (UQDI) have developed a new predictive diagnostic test to determine patient response to a head and neck cancer treatment.
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This Augmented-Reality Sandbox Turns Dirt Into a UI

This Augmented-Reality Sandbox Turns Dirt Into a UI | Science News | Scoop.it
It's a sandbox that lets kids mold its contents into miniature mountains, lakes and rivers--and then, with a little high-tech magic, brings that terrain to life before their eyes.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Angie Mc's curator insight, August 31, 2013 10:02 AM

" a project out of UC Davis offers a glimpse of an entirely different type of high-tech educational engagement–one that doesn’t involve youngsters pressing their faces up against screens for hours on end. It’s a sandbox that lets kids mold its contents into miniature mountains, lakes and rivers–and then, with a little high-tech magic, brings that terrain to life before their eyes."

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The Building Blocks of Brain-friendly eLearning Courses

The Building Blocks of Brain-friendly eLearning Courses | Science News | Scoop.it
Here are five foundational elements of a brain-friendly eLearning courses.

1. Emotion

 

2. Repetition

 

3. Creation

 

4. Multi-sensory

 

5. Real context

 

 

 

 

 

 


Via k3hamilton, Dennis T OConnor
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Patricia Christian's curator insight, June 30, 2013 4:51 PM
It's all about engagement and creating an environment for learning.
Hanna Coleman's curator insight, July 2, 2013 1:49 PM

Important considerations when developing online science curriculum. The multi-sensory element especially is important as students need to engage in all forms, not just reading text online.

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Enhancing the Learner Experience: 3 Tips to Make eLearning More Engaging

Enhancing the Learner Experience: 3 Tips to Make eLearning More Engaging | Science News | Scoop.it
Would you be interested in 3 Tips to Make eLearning More Engaging?

 

Many of our clients who are just getting into eLearning give us an enchanting reason for finally abandoning the libraries of presentation decks that they have been building for the past decade or so. They want to find a magical place where they can control and standardize the content, but still have learners engaged enough to care about the topic, remember the content, and improve their on-the-job performance. ELearning can do that. This is that magical place. 

 
Via JohnThompson, Dennis T OConnor
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:16 PM

Interesantes consejos para mejorar el interés y lograr mayor compromiso de los estudiantes por los programas e-learning.

Cassandra Gadouas's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:28 AM

I would use this to teach more about how thoughts create reality.

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President Clinton Announces Commitment to Create New Pathways to College and Career Success Through Open Badges | HASTAC

President Clinton Announces Commitment to Create New Pathways to College and Career Success Through Open Badges | HASTAC | Science News | Scoop.it

Speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative America (CGI America) meeting, an annual event of the Clinton Global Initiative that seeks innovative solutions for economic recovery, Clinton said three partners – the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, and HASTAC – have created the commitment to Open Badges. Outreach and technical assistance will be provided to help employers and universities across the country incorporate Open Badges in hiring, promotions, admissions, and credit over the next three years.


Via Kim Flintoff, juandoming, Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor
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Cath Ellis's curator insight, June 30, 2013 7:50 PM

Amazing

Mary Clark's curator insight, July 1, 2013 8:11 AM

Would this work in middle and high school?  I have so many students who would, at least initially, be motivated to work online to earn badges.  I foresee issues of authentication of work, but there is something worth exploring here.

Dixie Conner's comment, July 2, 2013 10:21 AM
Yes, this would definitely work in all levels of education. K-12 and adult.
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The Socratic questioning process. How criticism and critical are not the same.

The Socratic questioning process. How criticism and critical are not the same. | Science News | Scoop.it

Via Dennis T OConnor
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

A good reminder of an old skill set

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Overarcher's curator insight, July 9, 2013 11:55 PM

socratic questioning in pictures, love it!

Maria Persson's comment, July 11, 2013 3:15 PM
My daily life at work and play so often involves Socratic questioning - I never get bored and constantly on a learning curve! Thanks for sharing this great resource!
Margarita Parra's comment, July 22, 2013 7:01 PM
There is an approach to solving a problem, by Guy Brousseau. It looks much like this process.And it works!
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Ancient DNA Found Hidden Below Sea Floor

Ancient DNA Found Hidden Below Sea Floor | Science News | Scoop.it

In the middle of the South Atlantic, there's a patch of sea almost devoid of life. There are no birds, few fish, not even much plankton. But researchers report that they've found buried treasure under the empty waters: ancient DNA hidden in the muck of the sea floor, which lies 5000 meters below the waves.

 

The DNA, from tiny, one-celled sea creatures that lived up to 32,500 years ago, is the first to be recovered from the abyssal plains, the deep-sea bottoms that cover huge stretches of Earth. In a separate finding published this week, another research team reports teasing out plankton DNA that's up to 11,400 years old from the floor of the much shallower Black Sea. The researchers say that the ability to retrieve such old DNA from such large stretches of the planet's surface could help reveal everything from ancient climate to the evolutionary ecology of the seas.

 

"We have been able to show that the deep sea is the largest long-time archive of DNA, and a major window to study past biodiversity," says Pedro Martinez Arbizu, a deep-sea biologist of the German Centre for Marine Biodiversity Research in Wilhelmshaven.

 

The new studies are "very exciting," says micropaleontologist Bridget Wade of the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, who was not connected to the research. Until now, it wasn't clear "how far back in time you could take these DNA studies. … These records are telling you new information that wasn't found in the fossil record."

 

The South Atlantic team went looking for DNA in plugs of silt and clay coaxed out of the ocean floor hundreds of kilometers off the Brazilian coast. The researchers were after genetic material from two related groups of marine organisms, the foraminifera and the radiolarians. Both are single-celled, and both include many species with beautiful pearly shells that fossilize nicely, making them a favorite target of researchers studying the prehistoric oceans.

 

The researchers used special pieces of DNA specific to radiolarians and foraminifera to fish out DNA from those groups. Then they sequenced the DNA and compared the results to known foraminifera and radiolarian DNA sequences. Their analysis showed they'd found 169 foraminifera species and 21 radiolarian species, many of which were unknown. What's more, many of the foraminifera species belonged to groups that don't form fossils


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Swimming Beneath the Brinicles, in Antarctica | Wired Science | Wired.com

Swimming Beneath the Brinicles, in Antarctica | Wired Science | Wired.com | Science News | Scoop.it
Brinicles are bizarre, otherworldly structures that reach down from the floating sea ice into frigid Antarctic waters, creating black pools of death on the sea floor. Wired Science blogger Jeffrey Marlow reports on the strange phenomenon.
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

These stunning and peculiar ice formations are difficult to comprehend from the comfort of a lounge chair!

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Behavior prediction software company Behavio now part of Google

Behavior prediction software company Behavio now part of Google | Science News | Scoop.it

Behavio, a company that developed software capable of collecting smartphone data in order to certain predict behavior, is now part of Google.


Via LeapMind
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This is progressing fast

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Revealing Dita Von Teese in a Fully Articulated 3D Printed Gown - Shapeways Blog on 3D Printing News & Innovation

Revealing Dita Von Teese in a Fully Articulated 3D Printed Gown - Shapeways Blog on 3D Printing News & Innovation | Science News | Scoop.it
Last night at the
Jayne Fenton Keane's insight:

Sometimes technology is emphatically sexy

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