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Could you repeat that please?

Could you repeat that please? | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Previously, I introduced the idea that the $1000 genome has not been achieved because it is defined in simplistic terms that ignore many aspects of data completeness and verification. In that analysis, I cited a recent perspective by Robasky, Lewis, and Church [1] to present concepts related to the need to verify results and the…
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Science&Nature
Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science. ~Edwin Powell Hubble
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Consumers driving 'shock' tree loss

Consumers driving 'shock' tree loss | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
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Implicit racism in academia

Implicit racism in academia | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Subtle racism is prevalent in US and UK universities, according to a new paper commissioned by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education and released last week, reports The Times Higher Educat...
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What Makes Humans Special?

What Makes Humans Special? | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
A graphical tour of our evolutionary advantages starts with anatomy
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Reviews of Nicholas Wade’s “A Troublesome Inheritance”

A list of reviews of Nicholas Wade’s book “A Troublesome Inheritance,” mainly by anthropologists and others who have investigated issues surrounding the concept of “race” in humans. Bethune, Brian: Inheritance battles Daniels, Anthony: Genetic disorder Dobbs, David: The Fault in Our DNA Fuentes, Augustín: The Troublesome Ignorance of Nicholas Wade Geneticists, Lotsofthem: An Open Letter…
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Neil deGrasse Tyson is not afraid of genetically modified foods - The Panda's Thumb

Neil deGrasse Tyson is not afraid of genetically modified foods - The Panda's Thumb | Science&Nature | Scoop.it

A blogger in the Daily Kos reports that Neil deGrasse Tyson thinks people should “chill out” regarding genetically modified food. Tyson argues, as I have for years, that all our food is genetically modified, but it took on the order of 10,000 years to get where we are now.

The pseudonymous blogger, SkepticalRaptor, notes that GM foods are to many on the left as global warming is to many on the right: It is an article of faith that genetic modification is bad, and no amount of evidence can be adduced to change that opinion.

I would add, though, that there are valid reasons to oppose at least some genetic modifications, such as corn that is immune to glyphosate (Roundup) or plants laced with insecticide (Bt). Additionally, you could reasonably argue (as does SkepticalRaptor) that, whereas it may be legal to sell seeds that cannot reproduce themselves, it is certainly immoral to sell them to farmers in developing countries. Finally, I seem to recall that there have been occasional problems introducing, say, fish genes into tomatoes. None of these problems speaks against genetically modified food in general, though they surely militate in favor of considerable caution.

SkepticalRaptor concludes with the observation that Tyson is correct in following the evidence to its conclusion rather than denying the evidence in order to support a preordained conclusion. I could not agree more.

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Two degrees: how the world failed on climate change

Two degrees: how the world failed on climate change | Science&Nature | Scoop.it

For 20 years, climate policy has centered around one goal: making sure we don't get more than 2°C of global warming. That goal is looking increasingly delusional.


Via Luca Baptista, Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Spider gene study reveals tangled evolution

Spider gene study reveals tangled evolution | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Arachnid family tree suggests that many spider species evolved away from web-weaving.
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Secret of sandstone shapes revealed

Secret of sandstone shapes revealed | Science&Nature | Scoop.it

Geologists have discovered the secret that gives dramatic natural sandstone monuments their shape: gravity.

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Oxygen fluctuations stalled life on Earth

Oxygen fluctuations stalled life on Earth | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Swings in oxygen levels may be behind a mysterious billion-year hiatus in evolution.
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Like All Animals, We Need Stress. Just Not Too Much

Like All Animals, We Need Stress. Just Not Too Much | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
A racing mind and a pounding heart aren't all bad — the stress response can help humans and other animals deal with the unexpected. So what makes a vital system, which evolved to help us, turn toxic?
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Fungi borrowed bacterial gene again and again

Fungi borrowed bacterial gene again and again | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Multiple independent gene transfers gave fungi ability to colonize plant roots.
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The origin of bright-colored birds

The origin of bright-colored birds | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Study suggests vibrant patterns first appeared about 56 million years ago
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Star Wars Geology | History of Geology, Scientific American Blog Network

Star Wars Geology | History of Geology, Scientific American Blog Network | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
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WARNING: wild extrapolation (a classification system for science news)

WARNING: wild extrapolation (a classification system for science news) | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Dean Burnett: Science news and writing can be intimidating for those new to it. A classification system for articles could help make things easier for everyone
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One Of The Best Examples Of Collective Intelligence You'll Ever See

Individual ants are not very smart, but ants working together in a colony are capable of extraordinary feats. Case in point is this remarkable video in which a colony of ants have transformed into a daisy chain to pull a dead millipede — behavior that's never been seen before.
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The Stars Beyond — Starts With A Bang! — Medium

The Stars Beyond — Starts With A Bang! — Medium | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
How the ruins of ancient galaxies inhabit the outer reaches of our Milky Way.
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What’s Up With That: Why It’s So Hard to Catch Your Own Typos | Science | WIRED

What’s Up With That: Why It’s So Hard to Catch Your Own Typos | Science | WIRED | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
The reason typos get through isn't because we're stupid or careless, it's because what we're doing is actually very smart.
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Volcanoes, Tree Rings, and Climate Models: This is how science works.

Volcanoes, Tree Rings, and Climate Models: This is how science works. | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Mark Your Cosmic Calendar: 774/775 One wonders if anyone felt it. Did Charlemagne feel it as he led his forces across Pagan Saxon Westphalia, knocking down Irminsuls and making everyone pretend to be Christian or else? Did the people of Bagdad, just becoming the world’s largest city, notice anything aside from their own metro-bigness? Did…
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What happens when the largest objects meet their twins? — Starts With A Bang! — Medium

What happens when the largest objects meet their twins? — Starts With A Bang! — Medium | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
From asteroids to planets to stars and more, doubling what you’ve got can be disastrous!
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The New Science of Evolutionary Forecasting | Quanta Magazine

The New Science of Evolutionary Forecasting |  Quanta Magazine | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Newly discovered patterns in evolution may help scientists make accurate short-term predictions.
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Giant Global “Chimney” Could Alter Climate Change

Giant Global “Chimney” Could Alter Climate Change | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Understanding how ocean gases are pumped into the upper atmosphere could help predict and even regulate our future world environment
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mississippi Child Thought Cured Of HIV Shows Signs Of Infection

Mississippi Child Thought Cured Of HIV Shows Signs Of Infection | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Scientists hoped the baby's apparent cure would lead to similar treatments in infants worldwide. But with the child still HIV-positive, some question the ethics of a large study in other children.
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Smithsonian Scientist and Collaborators Revise Timeline of Human Origins | Newsdesk

Smithsonian Scientist and Collaborators Revise Timeline of Human Origins | Newsdesk | Science&Nature | Scoop.it

Many traits unique to humans were long thought to have originated in the genus Homo between 2.4 and 1.8 million years ago in Africa. Although scientists have recognized these characteristics for decades, they are reconsidering the true evolutionary factors that drove them.

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Have We Been Interpreting Quantum Mechanics Wrong This Whole Time? | Science | WIRED

Have We Been Interpreting Quantum Mechanics Wrong This Whole Time? | Science | WIRED | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
For nearly a century, “reality” has been a murky concept. The laws of quantum physics seem to suggest that particles spend much of their time in a ghostly state, lacking even basic properties such as a definite location and instead existing everywhere and nowhere at once. Only when a particle is measured does it suddenly…
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Visiting one of the oldest observatories in the world - Astronomy Magazine - Interactive Star Charts, Planets, Meteors, Comets, Telescopes

Visiting one of the oldest observatories in the world - Astronomy Magazine - Interactive Star Charts, Planets, Meteors, Comets, Telescopes | Science&Nature | Scoop.it
Astronomy.com is for anyone who wants to learn more about astronomy events, cosmology, planets, galaxies, asteroids, astrophotography, the Big Bang, black holes, comets, constellations, eclipses, exoplanets, nebulae, meteors, quasars, observing, telescopes, NASA, Hubble, space missions, stargazing, and more
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