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US Scientists Find That Chemotherapy Boosts Cancer Growth

US Scientists Find That Chemotherapy Boosts Cancer Growth | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

Chemotherapy can damage healthy cells? Say it isn't so? You don't need a degree to figure this one out. Poison kills indiscriminately-- always has and always will.

 

While damaging healthy cells, chemotherapy also triggers them to secrete a protein that sustains tumor growth and resistance to further treatment.

 

Researchers in the United States made the “completely unexpected” finding they claimed while seeking to explain why cancer cells are so resilient inside the human body when they are easy to kill in the lab.

 

Only through the forces that have carefully conspired to thwart meaningful advances in cancer research and treatment over the past century has chemotherapy succeeded. In what reality do we live in when cut, poison and burn are the only ways acceptable to treat cancer?

 


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Elvin Joel Estrada's insight:

I read that chemotherapy could lead the formation of cancer stem cells. This cells could hide into the tissue and regrowth Like a tumor. 

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:02 PM

Some years ago Australian scientists found chemo has an appalling success rate of only some 2 or 3 percent. Here is why...

Sepp Hasslberger's comment, August 3, 2013 1:05 PM
See also:

Millions Wrongly Treated for 'Cancer,' National Cancer Institute Panel Confirms

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/millions-wrongly-treated-cancer-national-cancer-institute-panel-confirms
Stephanie T Holland's curator insight, August 4, 2013 4:37 AM

The realisation that we are more than just the sum of our parts continues to boggle members of the scientific community. I'm glad to see that research is being influenced by the spirit of the truth.

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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Health Supreme
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US Scientists Find That Chemotherapy Boosts Cancer Growth

US Scientists Find That Chemotherapy Boosts Cancer Growth | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

Chemotherapy can damage healthy cells? Say it isn't so? You don't need a degree to figure this one out. Poison kills indiscriminately-- always has and always will.

 

While damaging healthy cells, chemotherapy also triggers them to secrete a protein that sustains tumor growth and resistance to further treatment.

 

Researchers in the United States made the “completely unexpected” finding they claimed while seeking to explain why cancer cells are so resilient inside the human body when they are easy to kill in the lab.

 

Only through the forces that have carefully conspired to thwart meaningful advances in cancer research and treatment over the past century has chemotherapy succeeded. In what reality do we live in when cut, poison and burn are the only ways acceptable to treat cancer?

 


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Elvin Joel Estrada's insight:

I read that chemotherapy could lead the formation of cancer stem cells. This cells could hide into the tissue and regrowth Like a tumor. 

more...
Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:02 PM

Some years ago Australian scientists found chemo has an appalling success rate of only some 2 or 3 percent. Here is why...

Sepp Hasslberger's comment, August 3, 2013 1:05 PM
See also:

Millions Wrongly Treated for 'Cancer,' National Cancer Institute Panel Confirms

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/millions-wrongly-treated-cancer-national-cancer-institute-panel-confirms
Stephanie T Holland's curator insight, August 4, 2013 4:37 AM

The realisation that we are more than just the sum of our parts continues to boggle members of the scientific community. I'm glad to see that research is being influenced by the spirit of the truth.

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CRISPR-Cas targeted plasmid integration into mammalian cells via non-homologous end joining

CRISPR-Cas targeted plasmid integration into mammalian cells via non-homologous end joining | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

Via BigField GEG Tech
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BigField GEG Tech's curator insight, May 11, 11:18 AM

In this study, the authors show that a site specific double strand break (DSB) generated both in the genome and the donor plasmid using the CRISPR-Cas9 system can be efficiently used to target ∼5 kb plasmids into mammalian genomes via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). They were able to achieve efficiencies of up to 0.17% in HEK293 cells and 0.45% in CHO cells.


www.geg-tech.com/Vectors

Dominique Blanchard's comment, May 13, 8:46 AM
I'm going to read this paper because It will greatly impact owners of homologous recombination related patents.
Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Amazing Science
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Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.”

Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.

These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?

These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Risto Suoknuuti's curator insight, May 17, 4:23 AM

Man made machines for mans use. Systems simplyfies after getting complex. This is the rule in the winning game.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

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Drug Could Rejuvenate Aging Brain And Muscle Tissue

Drug Could Rejuvenate Aging Brain And Muscle Tissue | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ The ability of adult stem cells to renew themselves decline as we age, but researchers have discovered a small molecular drug that could ‘rejuvenate’ brain and muscle tissue. The study, published in the journal Oncotarget, successfully interrupted the activity of a growth factor in mice that has been previously shown to affect a stem cell’s ability to regenerate. ”
Via Steven Krohn
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Sea level rise accelerated over the past two decades, research finds

Sea level rise accelerated over the past two decades, research finds | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“IPCC climate modelling proves right as scientists find a glitch in satellite led to inaccurate records in 1990s suggesting rate of sea level rise was slowing”
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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Medical Science
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New Type Of Stem Cell Discovered

New Type Of Stem Cell Discovered | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ Scientists have stumbled upon a new type of human cell, capable of becoming any organ or tissue, that may help unravel the secrets of early embryo development. They may even open a new door into growing human organs in large animals for research and medicinal purposes.”
Via Steven Krohn
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Deep-ocean microbe is closest living relative of complex cells

Deep-ocean microbe is closest living relative of complex cells | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

Scientists have discovered a microorganism that may bridge the gap between simple and complex cellular life forms. The discovery, reported in the journal Nature, will have far-reaching implications in our understanding of the evolution of life on Earth, including humans.

It’s one of the most significant, and most vexing, splits in life’s history. About 2 billion years ago, the prokaryotes, relatively simple single-celled organisms that include bacteria and archaea, gave rise to the more elaborate eukaryotes, the lineage that ultimately spawned multicellular life forms such as fungi, plants, and animals like us. Now, researchers combing through muck from the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean have identified an archaeon that is the closest living relative of eukaryotes so far discovered.

The microbe, informally dubbed Loki and described this week in Nature, has set off a buzz among evolutionary biologists. “It tells us something very important about the origin of eukaryotes,” says Eugene Koonin of the National Center for Biotechnology Information in Bethesda, Maryland. “The ancestor of eukaryotes was a highly complex organism related to other archaea.” The deep-sea microbe “looks like a potential transitional form” that preserves one of the evolutionary steps between archaea and eukaryotes, adds evolutionary cell biologist Mark Field of the University of Dundee in the United Kingdom.

Unlike prokaryotes, eukaryotes sport organelles such as power-generating mitochondria and—in plants and some protists—light-capturing chloroplasts. Moreover, they stow DNA inside a nucleus that’s enclosed by a membrane, and their cells feature other internal structures built of membranes, such as the Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum.

Mitochondria and chloroplasts, researchers agree, are descended from formerly free-living prokaryotes that took up residence in other ancient cells. But the identity of the organism that captured and tamed those microbes remains unclear. Molecular evidence suggests that archaea are the closest relatives of eukaryotes. Researchers have disagreed, however, about whether eukaryotes branched off from a simpler prokaryote before archaea emerged—the traditional three-domain view of life—or evolved later, directly from archaea


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Kim Frye Housh
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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Next Generation Science Standards
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Home page | Science in the Classroom

Home page | Science in the Classroom | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

A collection of annotated research papers and accompanying teaching materials for high school and university students.


Via John Spiegel
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John Spiegel's curator insight, May 7, 10:27 AM

What phenomena identified in these research papers can be brought to the classroom as we seek relevant topics for exploration in NGSS?

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The Answer To Tackling Superbugs Could Be … More Superbugs

The Answer To Tackling Superbugs Could Be … More Superbugs | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ Hard-to-kill bacteria or “superbugs” have become a major problem for hospitals. Between 5% and 12% of hospital patients in the EU are thought to acquire an infection during their stay, with many caused by bacteria such as Clostridium difficile (C. diff) that are resistant to antibiotics.”
Via Steven Krohn
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NIH bans funding for genetic engineering of human embryos

NIH bans funding for genetic engineering of human embryos | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Researchers from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China made headlines late last month upon announcing that they had successfully edited the genes of”
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Eat More Plants to Improve Health, Combat Climate Change

Eat More Plants to Improve Health, Combat Climate Change | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“U.K. researchers find changed diets could substantially cut greenhouse gas pollution and benefit health”
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Climate change could threaten one in six species with future extinction

Climate change could threaten one in six species with future extinction | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Climate change-induced extinction risks are not only growing with every degree the planet warms — the rates are actually speeding up, the study found.”
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Researchers Identify Potential New Targets For Cancer Treatments

Researchers Identify Potential New Targets For Cancer Treatments | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ An international consortium of researchers—led by a group from the University of Leicester—have identified key steps in cell division that could reveal new targets for cancer therapy. The two papers, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, provide new insights into the mechanics of cell division, how it goes wrong in cancer and how scientists could tailor drugs to target the process, which may effectively eradicate the tumor.”
Via Steven Krohn
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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Longevity science
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How DNA sequencing is transforming the hunt for new drugs

How DNA sequencing is transforming the hunt for new drugs | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Drug manufacturers have begun amassing enormous troves of human DNA in hopes of significantly shortening the time it takes to identify new drug candidates, a move some say is transforming the development of medicines.The efforts will help researchers identify rare genetic mutations by scanning large databases of volunteers who agree to have their DNA sequenced and to provide access to detailed medical records.”
Via Ray and Terry's
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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Longevity science
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Men who exercise may delay age-related high cholesterol

Men who exercise may delay age-related high cholesterol | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Men who get plenty of aerobic exercise may delay the onset of age-related high cholesterol, potentially lowering their risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.Researchers followed thousands of men over several decades, periodically drawing blood to test their cholesterol and then making them run on treadmills to measure their cardiorespiratory fitness. Men who could run longer and faster – signs that their bodies more easily deliver oxygen to muscles – also had lower cholesterol.”
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Deregulation of Aviation Paved the Way for Chemtrails

“Many decades of weather and climate modification development have left the worlds criminal elite, the oligarchy in a position to con the masses into believing ...”
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Genetics: Risk or destiny?

Genetics: Risk or destiny? | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Information is Beautiful Studio take a visual approach to exploring the complex relationships between our health, genes, lifestyle and environment.”
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CRISPR screen: A high-throughput approach for cancer genetic research

CRISPR screen: A high-throughput approach for cancer genetic research | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

Via BigField GEG Tech
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Rescooped by Elvin Joel Estrada from Longevity science
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Penn Study: Omega-3 Could Reduce Antisocial And Aggressive Behavior In Kids

Penn Study: Omega-3 Could Reduce Antisocial And Aggressive Behavior In Kids | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“According to a new study, omega-3, a fatty acid that’s commonly found in fish oil, could help reduce behavior problems in kids who tend to be aggressive and anti-social.”
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Redefining Science Education

Redefining Science Education | Science Lovers | Scoop.it

There is a major mismatch between opportunity and action in most education systems today. It revolves around what is meant by “science education,” a term that is incorrectly defined in current usage. Rather than learning how to think scientifically, students are generally being told about science and asked to remember facts. This disturbing situation must be corrected if science education is to have any hope of taking its proper place as an essential part of the education of students everywhere.


Via John Spiegel
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John Spiegel's curator insight, May 7, 10:17 AM

This article highlights a systemic problem in science education (K-16). Because we have only focused on one of the four goals recommended for science education, we have created students and adults who are unable to utilize what science has to offer to make and analyze ideas. NGSS, with its focus on three-dimensional learning, attempts to shift what teaching and learning look like.

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Ebola is found in doctor's eye months after virus left blood

Ebola is found in doctor's eye months after virus left blood | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ For the first time, Ebola has been discovered inside the eyes of a patient months after the virus was gone from his blood.”
Via SIN JONES
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P-Value Interpretation

P-Value Interpretation | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ If all else fails, use "significant at p>0.05 level" and hope no one notices. -xkcd by Randall Munroe I can't say that I ever thought about doing this, but I can admit feeling enormous stress pr...”
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Scientists create climate change-resistant trees that grow bigger, faster - Factor

Scientists create climate change-resistant trees that grow bigger, faster - Factor | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Scientists have genetically modified trees to make them grow faster, wider, taller and with more leaves, which they say will enable them to be more resistant to climate change and a better source of renewable resources The research team, from The ...”
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Just 90 companies caused two-thirds of man-made global warming emissions

Just 90 companies caused two-thirds of man-made global warming emissions | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“Chevron, Exxon and BP among companies most responsible for climate change since dawn of industrial age, figures show”
Elvin Joel Estrada's insight:
Wow, que impactante!
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Origin of life: Chemistry of seabed's hot vents could explain emergence of life

Origin of life: Chemistry of seabed's hot vents could explain emergence of life | Science Lovers | Scoop.it
“ Hot vents on the seabed could have spontaneously produced the organic molecules necessary for life, according to new research. The study shows how the surfaces of mineral particles inside hydrothermal vents have similar chemical properties to enzymes, the biological molecules that govern chemical reactions in living organisms. This means that vents are able to create simple carbon-based molecules, such as methanol and formic acid, out of the dissolved CO2 in the water.”
Via Mariaschnee
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