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2013 Quiz

2013 Quiz | Science journalism | Scoop.it
This quiz is open to all, and new or existing SASJA members that have paid their membership fees for 2014 can win a great selection of books, including Leonie Joubert's Scorched: South Africa's Cha...
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The Functional Art: An Introduction to Information Graphics and Visualization: Storytelling, journalism, visualization, and science: A discussion in Nature Methods

The Functional Art: An Introduction to Information Graphics and Visualization: Storytelling, journalism, visualization, and science: A discussion in Nature Methods | Science journalism | Scoop.it
Interesting discussion about the role of storytelling in science http://t.co/9dyqgizMdm thanks to @yardenkatz for pointing me to this.
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Penny Bailey on science writing: 'You need to know how to tell a good story'

Penny Bailey on science writing: 'You need to know how to tell a good story' | Science journalism | Scoop.it
Our blog to accompany the 2013 Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize asks top science writers about their craft. Today it's Wellcome Trust writer Penny Bailey

Via Charles Tiayon
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Science versus Journalism - German Lang. Media

Science versus Journalism - German Lang. Media | Science journalism | Scoop.it
"Freedom is always the freedom of the dissident to express himself", said the German socialist Rosa Luxemburg, emphasizing the freedom of speech. But how factual does the "speech" have to be?

Via Thomas Faltin
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For the sake of science

For the sake of science | Science journalism | Scoop.it
The internet has largely weighed in on Popular Science’s sudden decision to shut off its comments section earlier this week.

In a blog post, Marie-Claire Shanahan, the chairwoman of science education at the University of Calgary, agreed, commenting on the “large gap” between how PopSci characterizes the study results versus what the results actually say. Eighty-three percent of the influence of the piece was based on factors that had nothing to do with the comments, explains Shanahan, and the fact that “the civility of the comments had “NO SIGNIFICANT DIRECT EFFECT on readers’ perceptions of nanotechnology,” a fact left conveniently out of LaBarre’s analysis of the study.


Via Andrea Naranjo
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Are Scientists Who Blog Undercutting Professional Science Writers ...

Are Scientists Who Blog Undercutting Professional Science Writers ... | Science journalism | Scoop.it
Recent events have got me thinking about writing for free. When I started out, I blogged for free. I did that for four years. Now Discover pay me some, but.
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