Science is our friend
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Science is our friend
Interesting news and insights into science!
Curated by Natalia Corres
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Global Handwashing Day, October 15 | The Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing (PPPHW)

Global Handwashing Day, October 15 | The Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing (PPPHW) | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Natalia Corres's insight:

Wash your hands for the length of time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday to you"....and lather up!

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Earthquake swarm: Why 600 mini-quakes hit Mammoth Lakes, Calif.

Earthquake swarm: Why 600 mini-quakes hit Mammoth Lakes, Calif. | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Earthquake swarm: Hundreds of small earthquakes over two days near Mammoth Lakes do not appear to be a precursor to a big quake or a volcanic eruption.
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This 3D Printed Vertebra Is A Huge Step Forward For Medicine

This 3D Printed Vertebra Is A Huge Step Forward For Medicine | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Technology like this will transform people's lives.
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New wearable robotic exoskeleton gives you superhuman powers

New wearable robotic exoskeleton gives you superhuman powers | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Engineers and roboticists in the US have developed a ’smart’ robotic suit made from lightweight, flexible materials that can enhance th
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Home - Google Science Fair 2014

Home - Google Science Fair 2014 | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Google Science Fair is a global online competition open to students from 13 to 18 years old. What do you want to change?
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Strong solar storm zipping to Earth, but worst effects skim above planet, scientists say

Strong solar storm zipping to Earth, but worst effects skim above planet, scientists say | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong solar flare is blasting its way to Earth, but the worst of its power looks like it will barely skim above the planet and not cause many problems.
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Meteor Leaves 40-Foot Crater Near Managua's Airport

Meteor Leaves 40-Foot Crater Near Managua's Airport | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
The space rock, thought to have broken off from an Earth-passing asteroid, left a hole 16 feet deep just outside the international airport in the Nicaraguan capital.
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The Rise of Culture and the Fall of Testosterone

The Rise of Culture and the Fall of Testosterone | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Credit: Robert Cieri, University of Utah

In a paper published in the journal Current Anthropology, a team
of researchers funded by The Leakey Foundation explore the biological basis
of the technology boom and expansion of culture that happened 50,000 years
ago. 

DURHAM, N.C. -- Modern humans appear in the fossil record about 200,000
years ago, but it was only about 50,000 years ago that making art and
advanced tools became widespread.

A new study appearing Aug. 1 in the journal Current Anthropology finds that
human skulls changed in ways that indicate a lowering of testosterone
levels at around the same time that culture was blossoming.

"The modern human behaviors of technological innovation, making art and
rapid cultural exchange probably came at the same time that we developed a
more cooperative temperament," said lead author Robert Cieri, a biology
graduate student at the University of Utah who began this work as a senior
at Duke University.

Credit: Robert Cieri, University of Utah

The study, which is based on measurements of more than 1,400 ancient and
modern skulls, makes the argument that human society advanced when people
started being nicer to each other, which entails having a little less
testosterone in action.

Heavy brows were out, rounder heads were in, and those changes can be
traced directly to testosterone levels acting on the skeleton, according to
Duke anthropologist Steven Churchill, who supervised Cieri's work on a
senior honors thesis that grew to become this 24-page journal article three
years later.

What they can't tell from the bones is whether these humans had less
testosterone in circulation, or fewer receptors for the hormone.

The research team also included Duke animal cognition researchers Brian
Hare and Jingzhi Tan, who say this argument is in line with what has been
established in non-human species.
In a classic study of Siberian foxes, animals that were less wary and less
aggressive toward humans took on a different, more juvenile appearance and
behavior after several generations of selective breeding.

"If we're seeing a process that leads to these changes in other animals, it
might help explain who we are and how we got to be this way," said Hare,
who also studies differences between our closest ape relatives --
aggressive chimpanzees and mellow, free-loving bonobos.

Those two apes develop differently, Hare said, and they respond to social
stress differently. Chimpanzee males experience a strong rise in
testosterone during puberty, but bonobos do not. When stressed, the bonobos
don't produce more testosterone, as chimps do, but they do produce more
cortisol, the stress hormone.Their social interactions are profoundly
different and, relevant to this finding, their faces are different, too.
"It's very hard to find a brow-ridge in a bonobo," Hare said.

Craniofacial feminization in Homo sapiens. The 110-90 Ka year old male
specimen Skhul 5 (left) in lateral (top) and frontal (bottom) views,
compared to that of a recent African male (right), showing the large brow
ridges and long and narrow, masculinized face characteristic of
MSA/MP-associated modern humans. Both specimens have been scaled to the
same nasion-bregma height and aligned on those landmarks. Photo credit-
David Brill, used with permission. From Craniofacial Feminization, Social
Tolerance, and the Origins of Behavioral Modernity by Cieri et al.

Cieri compared the brow ridge, facial shape and interior volume of 13
modern human skulls older than 80,000 years, 41 skulls from 10,000 to
38,000 years ago, and a global sample of 1,367 20th century skulls from 30
different ethnic populations.The trend that emerged was toward a reduction
in the brow ridge and a shortening of the upper face, traits which
generally reflect a reduction in the action of testosterone.

There are a lot of theories about why, after 150,000 years of existence,
humans suddenly leapt forward in technology. Around 50,000 years ago, there
is widespread evidence of producing bone and antler tools, heat-treated and
flaked flint, projectile weapons, grindstones, fishing and birding
equipment and a command of fire. Was this driven by a brain mutation,
cooked foods, the advent of language or just population density?

The Duke study argues that living together and cooperating put a premium on
agreeableness and lowered aggression and that, in turn, led to changed
faces and more cultural exchange.
"If prehistoric people began living closer together and passing down new
technologies, they'd have to be tolerant of each other," Cieri said. "The
key to our success is the ability to cooperate and get along and learn from
one another."

This article is a news release from the Duke University Office of News and
Communications.

Work funded by The Leakey Foundation, NSF, and the University of Iowa
Orthodontics Department.
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TODAY: Student suspended for ‘sarcastic’ tweet sues school

TODAY: Student suspended for ‘sarcastic’ tweet sues school | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Video on Today: A Canadian woman was diagnosed with a stroke after she filmed herself suffering the symptoms, and posted it online. Doctors previously insisted she was just stressed. NBC’s Anne Thompson reports.
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Volunteering is good for your health, new study says

Volunteering is good for your health, new study says | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
You’ve heard it from us before. The Quiet Revolution is happening. Freelancers are moving away from consumption and towards connection and becoming more conscious about what their purchases mean for themselves and their neighbors. They’re also spending more of their time volunteering in their local communities. And, as it turns out, this doesn’t just benefit their neighbors, but their physical and mental health as well. Indeed, a new study by the UnitedHealth Group, the Optimum Institute, and Mashable has found a link between volunteering and better physical, mental, and emotional health. Here are some of the more interesting findings: 78% said that volunteering ...
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Self-healing plastic oozes fluids to mimic blood clots - tech - 08 May 2014 - New Scientist

Self-healing plastic oozes fluids to mimic blood clots - tech - 08 May 2014 - New Scientist | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
An artificial vascular system embedded in plastic can fill holes up to 8 millimetres wide and may one day help spacecraft and fighter jets mend themselves
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New super-heavy Element 117 confirmed by scientists

New super-heavy Element 117 confirmed by scientists | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Atoms of a new super-heavy element the as-yet-unnamed element 117 have reportedly been created by scientists in Germany, moving it closer to being officially recognized as part of the standard periodic table
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About 50 mummies discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

About 50 mummies discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
CAIRO, April 28 (Reuters) - Remains of about 50 mummies, including newborn babies, thought to belong to the 18th Pharaonic dynasty were found in a huge tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said on Monday.
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Fellows Tour of South Africa, "Humans Evolving" at the Adler, and Orangutan Long Calls

Fellows Tour of South Africa, "Humans Evolving" at the Adler, and Orangutan Long Calls | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
This majestic male orangutan was one of the subjects of Leakey Grantee Brigitte Spillman's study of the orangutan long call. Learn more about it in this month's newsletter.
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UBC biotech startup aims to print living human organs

UBC biotech startup aims to print living human organs | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Aspect Biosystems is a biotechonology company that generates living human tissues through the use of 3D printers.
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How 3D Printers Are Cranking Out Eyes, Bones, and Blood Vessels

How 3D Printers Are Cranking Out Eyes, Bones, and Blood Vessels | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
At the dawn of rapid prototyping, a common predication was that 3D printing would transform manufacturing, spurring a consumer revolution that would put a printer in every home. That hasn't quite happened---and like so many emerging technologies, rapid prototyping has found its foothold in a surprisingly different field: Medicine.
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"Favorite photos of last night’s aurora" | EarthSky.org | 09/13/14

"Favorite photos of last night’s aurora" | EarthSky.org | 09/13/14 | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Two powerful storms on the sun this week resulted in beautiful displays of the aurora borealis, or northern lights, that dipped down as far as the northern U.S.

Via Franklin Delano Williams
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Franklin Delano Williams's curator insight, September 13, 2014 11:22 AM

....Thanks EarthSky for these wonderful pictures!!

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Super Harvest Full Moon Rises Tonight

Super Harvest Full Moon Rises Tonight | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
The last super moon of the summer tonight will provide a breathtaking backdrop.
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Research Randomizer: Free Random Sampling and Random Assignment

Research Randomizer -- A Free Tool for Instant Random Sampling and Assignment.
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First potentially 'Habitable' planet discovered, other than Earth of course

First potentially 'Habitable' planet discovered, other than Earth of course | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
The first discovery of it's kind has been made, astronomers believe they may have found a 'habitable' planet orbiting a not too distant star.
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Mysterious Underwater Beast Eats 9-Foot-Long Great White Shark

Mysterious Underwater Beast Eats 9-Foot-Long Great White Shark | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Australian scientists believe that a 9-foot-long great white shark they were tracking for four months was eaten by a larger, unknown predator.
Natalia Corres's insight:

Hmmm. Shark Alpha, eh?  Why not whale or squid alpha? 

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Your Bike Helmet: More Than an Accessory - Natural Living Mamma

Your Bike Helmet: More Than an Accessory - Natural Living Mamma | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Your Bike Helmet: More Than an Accessory, Bike helmet safety guidelines for children and adults. How to fit a bike helmet. As in all aspects of safety, bike helmets are a situation where we should lead by example. Here are a few tips for choosing and fitting helmets for adults and children alike. Safety
Natalia Corres's insight:

Summer Summer Summer - please be safe as it gets to be prime biking weather!

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Artificial DNA breakthrough could lead to new treatments.

Artificial DNA breakthrough could lead to new treatments. | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
Researchers for the first time have created microbes containing artificial DNA, expanding the universal genetic code that guides life. The advance one day could lead to new antibiotics, vaccines and other medical products.
Natalia Corres's insight:

Cool.

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Young Blood May Hold Key to Reversing Aging

Young Blood May Hold Key to Reversing Aging | Science is our friend | Scoop.it
After scientists found that blood from young mice rejuvenated the muscles and brains of old mice, experts said the research could lead to treatments for illnesses like Alzheimer’s disease.
Natalia Corres's insight:

Elizabeth Bathory was on to something - (look her up in wikipedia, if you don't already know this infamous historical figure).

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