Science is Cool!
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Science is Cool!
Check out all the amazing things being discovered through science!
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Traveller caught in India with monkey in pants

Traveller caught in India with monkey in pants | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

Customs authorities in India have arrested a man who was attempting to board a flight at New Delhi's international airport with a monkey in his underwear, a report said on Monday.


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World's Smallest Known Fossil Vertebrate Footprints From Small Amphibian Roaming Earth 315 Million Yrs Ago

World's Smallest Known Fossil Vertebrate Footprints From Small Amphibian Roaming Earth 315 Million Yrs Ago | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

A new set of fossil footprints discovered in Joggins, Nova Scotia, near Amherst, have been identified as the world’s smallest known fossil vertebrate footprints. The footprints were found at the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Joggins Fossil Cliffs. A fossil specimen of the ichnogenus Batrachichnus salamandroides was collected by local amateur paleontologist Gloria Melanson, daughter of Don Reid, the famed Keeper of the Joggins Cliffs, while walking the Joggins beach.

 

“This was one of the most exciting finds I have ever made and I am very pleased that, along with my colleagues, we are able to share it with the world. Every big fossil find is by chance; it's all about being lucky and recognizing what you’re looking at. When I saw the very small tail and toes I knew we had something special. I never thought it would be the world’s smallest,” said Melanson.

 

The footprints belonged to a small amphibian which would have roamed the Earth 315 million years ago, a creature not unlike a salamander. Small trackways of these animals at Joggins are common, but none so small as the one discovered recently. The 48-mm-long trackway preserves approximately 30 footprints with the front feet measuring 1.6 mm long and back feet measuring 2.4 mm long. Study of the footprints by paleontologists at Saint Mary's University (student Matt Stimson) and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History (Dr. Spencer Lucas) has revealed the trace maker was a juvenile amphibian, similar to a salamander (temnospondyl or microsaur) with an estimated body length of only 8 mm from snout to tail.


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New study: There is enough wind potential on Earth's surface to power human civilization 100 times over

New study: There is enough wind potential on Earth's surface to power human civilization 100 times over | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

At the moment, wind power supplies about 4.1 percent of electric power in the United States. Still a bit player. Yet there’s a whole lot of untapped wind left in the world. Wind whipping through the Great Plains. Wind gusting off the shores. Wind circulating high up in the sky. So what would happen if we tried to harvest all of that wind?

 

We’d have enough energy to power the world. At least in theory. A new study published this week in Nature Climate Change finds that there’s enough wind potential both on the Earth’s surface and up in the atmosphere to power human civilization 100 times over. Right now, humans use about 18 terawatts of power worldwide. And, technically, the study found, we could extract about 400 terawatts of wind power from the Earth’s surface and 1,800 terawatts of power from the upper atmosphere.

 

Even the most optimistic near-term projections for wind power, however, tend to be more restrained. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy released a comprehensive report estimating that wind power could provide, at most, 20 percent of U.S. electricity by 2030. And for that to happen, the cost of wind power would have to keep plunging, the number of turbines built would have to steadily increase by about 14 percent each year, and utilities would have to build new transmission lines to accommodate the extra energy.


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Mathematicians offer new unified theory of dark matter/dark energy - altering Einstein's field equations

Mathematicians offer new unified theory of dark matter/dark energy - altering Einstein's field equations | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
A pair of mathematicians -- one from Indiana University and the other from Sichuan University in China -- have proposed a unified theory of dark matter and dark energy that alters Einstein's equations describing the fundamentals of gravity.

 

Shouhong Wang, a professor in the IU College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Mathematics, and Tian Ma, a professor at Sichuan University, suggest the law of energy and momentum conservation in spacetime is valid only when normal matter, dark matter and dark energy are all taken into account. For normal matter alone, energy and momentum are no longer conserved, they argue.

 

While still employing the metric of curved spacetime that Einstein used in his field equations, the researchers argue the presence of dark matter and dark energy -- which scientists believe accounts for at least 95 percent of the universe -- requires a new set of gravitational field equations that take into account a new type of energy caused by the non-uniform distribution of matter in the universe. This new energy can be both positive and negative, and the total over spacetime is conserved, Wang said.


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ChronoZoom - The Arrow of Time Visualized

ChronoZoom - The Arrow of Time Visualized | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

ChronoZoom is an open-source community project dedicated to visualizing humanity, human prehistory, life, earth and the cosmos.


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Scientists Dramatically Reduce A-beta levels in Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists Dramatically Reduce A-beta levels in Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

Scientists have found that eliminating an enzyme from mice with symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease leads to a 90 percent reduction in the compounds responsible for formation of the plaques linked to Alzheimer’s disease. That's the biggest drop in A-beta levels that has been reported so far by treating animal models with drugs or genetic manipulation. The compounds are amyloid beta, or A-beta peptides; peptides are proteins, but are shorter in length. When A-beta peptides accumulate in excessive amounts in the brain, they can form plaques, which are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. The key to reducing A-beta peptides was the elimination of an enzyme called jnk3. This enzyme stimulates a protein that produces A-beta peptides, suggesting that when jnk3 activities are high, A-beta peptide production increases – increasing chances for their accumulation and formation into plaques.

 

The researchers also observed that jnk3 activities in brain tissue from Alzheimer’s disease patients were increased by 30 to 40 percent when compared to normal human brain tissue. Jnk3 activity typically remains low in the brain, but increases when physiological abnormalities arise. The findings suggest that jnk3 could be a new target for Alzheimer’s disease intervention, Yoon said. So far, some drugs can slow the disease’s progression, but there is no cure.

 

Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 5 million Americans, and its cause remains unknown. Although scientists have not yet determined whether A-beta peptides present in plaques cause Alzheimer’s disease or form as a consequence of the disease, the presence of the plaques is linked to progressive cognitive decline.


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Archaeologists find "unprecedented" Neolithic Figurine

Archaeologists find "unprecedented" Neolithic Figurine | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

Historic Scotland is celebrating after a third prehsitoric stone figure was found in the archaeologically fertile grounds of the Links of Notland on Westray, Orkney.


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The Oldest Trees on the Planet - Pando, Methuselah, and more

The Oldest Trees on the Planet - Pando, Methuselah, and more | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

While Pando isn’t technically the oldest individual tree, this clonal colony of Quaking Aspen in Utah is truly ancient. The 105-acre colony is made of genetically identical trees, called stems, connected by a single root system. The “trembling giant” got its start at least 80,000 years ago, when all of our human ancestors were still living in Africa. But some estimate the woodland could be as old as 1 million years, which would mean Pando predates the earliest Homo sapiens by 800,000 years. At 6,615 tons, Pando is also one of the heaviest living organism on earth.

 

Methuselah - The world’s oldest individual tree lives 10,000 feet above sea level in the Inyo National Forest, California. A staggering 4,765 years old, this primeval tree was already a century old when the first pyramid was built in Egypt. The tree is hidden among other millennia-old Great Basin bristlecone pines in a grove called the Forest of Ancients. To protect the tree from vandalism, the forest service keeps its exact location secret, but this one looks like it could be Methuselah.

 


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A First: Trojan Asteroid Found Sharing Earth's Orbit

A First: Trojan Asteroid Found Sharing Earth's Orbit | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

A tiny space rock companion will remain tied to our planet for at least ten thousand years, experts predict. This tiny Trojan asteroid is partially tethered to Earth by a gravitational leash and is our planet's first known Trojan asteroid, astronomers say.

 

Trojans are objects that exist in gravitationally stable regions in front of or behind another body, so that the two share the same orbit but never collide. Earth's newfound Trojan is about 1,000 feet (300 meters) wide and sits about 50 million miles (80 million kilometers) in front of Earth. Trojan asteroids have been found around Jupiter, Neptune, and Mars, and Saturn is orbited by a few groups of Trojan moons.


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Scientists Grow Sperm From Skin Cells

Scientists Grow Sperm From Skin Cells | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
Researchers grow sperm in a lab; say the technique could be used to cure male sterility in the future.

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Katherine Martinez's comment, February 17, 2014 10:12 PM
This article is about scientist that have figured out that they can grow sperm from skin cells. A university figured out that maybe human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells can become sperm cells. This article is so interesting. I can't believe that this could actually happen. The negative thing about this is that If this is possible, imagine how much more the population is going to increase. I can't wait to see what else we're going to figure out.
maurice jefferies's comment, May 25, 10:45 PM
this article was about how scientist have figured out how to make sperm from skin cells. they figured out that skin had some of the same properties that was in sperm. tjis article was interesting because i didn't think skin could be sperm.
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How Baby-Driven Robots Could Help Disabled Children

How Baby-Driven Robots Could Help Disabled Children | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
The latest in research about robots for babies who can't even crawl yet.

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Sriram's comment, August 29, 2012 5:25 AM
excellent
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Familiar music arouses coma patients

Familiar music arouses coma patients | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
Last month, dozens of news outlets reported the story of Charlotte Neve, the seven-year-old girl from Lancashire who awoke from a coma after hearing one of her favourite songs. "It's a complete miracle," the girl's mother, Leila, told The Sun. "I thought I was going to lose my little girl. I climbed into her hospital bed to give her a cuddle … and Adele came on the radio. I started singing it to her because she loves her and we used to sing that song together. Charlotte started smiling and I couldn't believe it."

 

There are other, similar cases. Earlier this year, Bee Gees singer Robin Gibb fell into a coma after contracting pneumonia, and reportedly emerged from it 12 days later after family members began playing familiar music and singing to him. Such cases provide anecdotal evidence that familiar music has beneficial effects on comatose patients. Now, French researchers have conducted the first scientific study of this phenomenon, and their preliminary findings suggest that familiar music probably can increase arousal in coma patients, and may also enhance their cognitive processes....


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Dr. Kaku's Must-See Videos

Dr. Kaku's Must-See Videos | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
Dr. Michio Kaku gives us a tour of some of the best science videos on the web, from Carl Sagan to CERN.

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New monkey species identified in Africa

New monkey species identified in Africa | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
A new species of monkey has been identified in Africa, researchers have said.

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Mathematician Claims Proof of Connection between Prime Numbers

Mathematician Claims Proof of Connection between Prime Numbers | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

A Japanese mathematician claims to have the proof for the ABC conjecture, a statement about the relationship between prime numbers that has been called the most important unsolved problem in number theory. If Shinichi Mochizuki's 500-page proof stands up to scrutiny, mathematicians say it will represent one of the most astounding achievements of mathematics of the twenty-first century.

The proof will also have ramifications all over mathematics, and even in the real-world field of data encryption.

 

The ABC conjecture, proposed independently by the mathematicians David Masser and Joseph Oesterle in 1985 but not proven by them, involves the concept of square-free numbers, or numbers that cannot be divided by the square of any number. (A square number is the product of some integer with itself).

 

Mochizuki, a mathematician at Kyoto University, has proved extremely deep theorems in the past, lending credence to his claim that he has the proof for ABC.


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Tough gel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and even heals itself

Tough gel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and even heals itself | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

A team of experts in mechanics, materials science, and tissue engineering at Harvard have created an extremely stretchy and tough gel that may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints. Called a hydrogel, because its main ingredient is water, the new material is a hybrid of two weak gels that combine to create something much stronger. Not only can this new gel stretch to 21 times its original length, but it is also exceptionally tough, self-healing, and biocompatible—a valuable collection of attributes that opens up new opportunities in medicine and tissue engineering.


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Fico Ventilatory's comment, September 6, 2012 2:36 PM
This Reminds me that often, we need look no further than the kitchen for inspiration. risen BREAD works in much the same way as this Gel... Wheat gluten contains the composite proteins Gliadin and glutenin: One gives the bread it's Strength, the other it's elasticity, and the two are required in an exact ratio to make the Crusty, Fluffy European Breads we Westerners are most familiar with. (Gluten forms when glutenin molecules cross-link to form a sub-microscopic network attached to gliadin). I'll bet, from the sounds of it, this Gel works in much the same way.One needs to Look no Further than what's Extant in nature for inspiration: self-similarity is a Natural Law.
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Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions

Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

The most-studied mass extinction in Earth history happened 65 million years ago and is widely thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs. New University of Washington research indicates that a separate extinction came shortly before that, triggered by volcanic eruptions that warmed the planet and killed life on the ocean floor.

 

The well-known second event is believed to have been triggered by an asteroid at least 6 miles in diameter slamming into Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. But new evidence shows that by the time of the asteroid impact, life on the seafloor – mostly species of clams and snails – was already perishing because of the effects of huge volcanic eruptions on the Deccan Plateau in what is now India.

 

“The eruptions started 300,000 to 200,000 years before the impact, and they may have lasted 100,000 years,” said Thomas Tobin, a UW doctoral student in Earth and space sciences. The eruptions would have filled the atmosphere with fine particles, called aerosols, that initially cooled the planet but, more importantly, they also would have spewed carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to produce long-term warming that led to the first of the two mass extinctions.


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Voyager 1 set to leave solar system after 35 years

Voyager 1 set to leave solar system after 35 years | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
In 1977, Jimmy Carter moved into the White House, "Star Wars" and "Saturday Night Fever" premiered in theaters and the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral to explore the outer solar system.
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Sea monster: sea grass is the world's oldest and largest living thing

Sea monster: sea grass is the world's oldest and largest living thing | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

It's big, it's old and it lives under the sea and now an international research collaboration with The University of Western Australia's Ocean's Institute has confirmed an ancient seagrass to hold the secrets of the oldest living organism on earth.

 

Because ancient giant Posidonia oceanica reproduces asexually generating clones of itself, a single organism has been found to span up to 15 kilometers wide, reaching more than 6,000 metric tonnes in mass and may well be more than 100,000 years old.

 

Researchers analysed 40 meadows across 3,500 kilometres of the Mediterranean sea. Computer models helped demonstrate that the clonal spread mode of Posidonia oceanica, which as all other seagrasses can reproduce both sexually and asexually, allows them to spread and maintain highly-competent clones over millennia, whereas even the most competent genotypes of organisms that can only reproduce sexually are lost at every generation. The genus Posidonia occurs only in the Mediterranean and Australian waters.


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WeeBots: Driveable Robots for Babies Who Need Them - IEEE Spectrum

WeeBots: Driveable Robots for Babies Who Need Them - IEEE Spectrum | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
Even at just six months old, babies turn out to be proficient robot drivers...

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Nikon Small World: Science Photo Competition from 1977-2011

Nikon Small World: Science Photo Competition from 1977-2011 | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

View the photo and video galleries


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Maybe your Baby can't read. But what about Sign Language?

Maybe your Baby can't read. But what about Sign Language? | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

Robert Titzer, an educator with a doctorate in human performance from Indiana University, and his company claimed that more than a million families successfully used the “Your Baby Can Read” program and that they had studies to back up these claims. The FTC on the other hand says those studies were flawed.


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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".


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Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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The way we'll live next

The way we'll live next | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it

With cities running out of room, the world’s ever-expanding population may soon need to find new homes. But where? Sea, sky, or desert? We look at the alternatives


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Music and Mathematics: Algorithmic Composition « mixolydianblog

Music and Mathematics: Algorithmic Composition « mixolydianblog | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
The process of music composition can be, at times, a severely trying exercise. There seem to be endless techniques and approaches that a composer can use to further their artistic pursuits. One particular method may seem ...

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