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Science is Cool!
Check out all the amazing things being discovered through science!
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Robotic arm controlled by the mind allows paraplegic woman to feed herself - video

A revolutionary robotic arm, controlled by the mind, allows a woman paralysed from the neck down to feed herself for the first time in 10 years

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Annie's comment, February 13, 2013 9:46 AM
I am happy for her...she has more control in her life now...
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Familiar music arouses coma patients

Familiar music arouses coma patients | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
Last month, dozens of news outlets reported the story of Charlotte Neve, the seven-year-old girl from Lancashire who awoke from a coma after hearing one of her favourite songs. "It's a complete miracle," the girl's mother, Leila, told The Sun. "I thought I was going to lose my little girl. I climbed into her hospital bed to give her a cuddle … and Adele came on the radio. I started singing it to her because she loves her and we used to sing that song together. Charlotte started smiling and I couldn't believe it."

 

There are other, similar cases. Earlier this year, Bee Gees singer Robin Gibb fell into a coma after contracting pneumonia, and reportedly emerged from it 12 days later after family members began playing familiar music and singing to him. Such cases provide anecdotal evidence that familiar music has beneficial effects on comatose patients. Now, French researchers have conducted the first scientific study of this phenomenon, and their preliminary findings suggest that familiar music probably can increase arousal in coma patients, and may also enhance their cognitive processes....


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Sakis Koukouvis
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Science Has Created a Substitute for Breathing

Science Has Created a Substitute for Breathing | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
A single intravenous injection of a lipid-based gas-filled solution brought 15 minutes worth of life-saving oxygen to rabbits with completely blocked airways.

 

PROBLEM: Patients who can't breathe need oxygen quickly to avoid cardiac arrest and brain injury. Unfortunately, attempts in the early 1900s to intravenously supply this essential gas failed to oxygenate the blood and often caused dangerous air bubbles. Current treatments, such as blood substitutes, breathing masks, and tubes, aren't always effective as well since they still rely on the lungs to function or require time to properly administer. . . .


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Deborah Verran's comment, July 1, 2012 12:40 AM
Brilliant research. Hopefully it is being trialled in humans.
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The Toll Social Rejection Takes On The Body

The Toll Social Rejection Takes On The Body | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
We all know that rejection seriously hurts -- and now a new study shows how it could actually be bad for our health.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Scientists can now block heroin, morphine addiction

Scientists can now block heroin, morphine addiction | Science is Cool! | Scoop.it
In a major breakthrough, an international team of scientists has proven that addiction to morphine and heroin can be blocked, while at the same time increasing pain relief.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Leila Yazdi's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:08 PM

A major breakthrough in the treatment of morphine and heorin addiction was found. Scientists have discovered a way to stop the addiction of both heroin and morphine while still acting as a pain killer. This will potentially lead to a new drug that can prevent the addiction of morphine and heroin, both of which are highly addictive drugs. This is how the drug works: "The drug (+)-naloxone automatically shuts down the addiction. It shuts down the need to take opioids, it cuts out behaviours associated with addiction, and the neurochemistry in the brain changes -- dopamine, which is the chemical important for providing that sense of 'reward' from the drug, is no longer produced."