Science - Interesting developments in Research
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Science - Interesting developments in Research
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Strange galaxy perplexes astronomers: Prominent 'jets' of subatomic particles

Strange galaxy perplexes astronomers: Prominent 'jets' of subatomic particles | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
With the help of citizen scientists, astronomers have found an important new example of a very rare type of galaxy that may provide valuable insight on galaxy evolution in the early Universe.
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Invisible shield found thousands of miles above Earth blocks 'killer electrons'

Invisible shield found thousands of miles above Earth blocks 'killer electrons' | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
An invisible shield has been discovered some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called 'killer electrons,' which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms.
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Finding infant Earths and potential life just got easier

Finding infant Earths and potential life just got easier | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Among the billions and billions of stars in the sky, where should astronomers look for infant Earths where life might develop? New research shows where -- and when -- infant Earths are most likely to be found.
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Scientists create new protein-based material with some nerve

Scientists create new protein-based material with some nerve | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Scientists have taken proteins from nerve cells and used them to create a 'smart' material that is extremely sensitive to its environment. The work could lead to new types of biological sensors, flow valves and controlled drug release systems, they report.
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Ovarian cancer oncogene found in 'junk DNA'

Ovarian cancer oncogene found in 'junk DNA' | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
A research team has mined 'junk DNA' sequences to identify a non-protein-coding RNA whose expression is linked to ovarian cancer. Using clinical, genetic, and gene expression data as filters to distinguish genes whose copy number alteration causes cancer from those for whom copy number changes are incidental, the team whittled down their list from 14,000 to a more manageable number, each of which they systematically tested using genetic experiments in animals.
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Quest continues for peanut that won't cause allergic reaction

Quest continues for peanut that won't cause allergic reaction | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
A food scientist has removed 80 percent of allergens from whole peanuts, moving him a step closer to eliminating 99.9 percent of peanut allergens. For the study, researchers used a pulsating light system to direct concentrated bursts of light to modify the peanut allergenic proteins. That way, they say, human antibodies can’t recognize them as allergens and begin to release histamines.
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BioTechniques - Bacteria Make Drug-Like Molecules in Humans

Small molecules that are produced by bacteria in the human body may represent a promising starting point for studying microbe-host interactions, and potentially a rich source of therapeutics. Read more...
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Cell - A Whole-Cell Computational Model Predicts Phenotype from Genotype

Cell - A Whole-Cell Computational Model Predicts Phenotype from Genotype | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it

Via Dmitry Alexeev
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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, March 25, 2014 5:14 AM

we are up into whole cell modelling)

and what are you up to today?))

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Building 3-D fractals on a nano scale

Building 3-D fractals on a nano scale | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
It starts with one 3-D structure with eight planes, an octahedron. This repeats itself to smaller octahedra: 625 after just four steps. At every corner of a new octahedron, a successive octahedron is formed. A truly fascinating 3D fractal ‘building’ is formed on the micro and nano scale.
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Carbon nanotubes for molecular magnetic resonances

Carbon nanotubes for molecular magnetic resonances | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new technique for measuring very weak forces on a molecular scale. Thanks to the use of carbon nanotubes, they have achieved the highest level of sensitivity to date. These results open the door for magnetic resonance imaging of individual molecules.
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Novel genetic patterns may make us rethink biology and individuality

Novel genetic patterns may make us rethink biology and individuality | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Scientists have made two novel discoveries: 1) a person can have several DNA mutations in parts of their body, with their original DNA in the rest -- resulting in several different genotypes in one individual -- and 2) some of the same genetic...
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Origins of genomic 'dark matter' discovered

Origins of genomic 'dark matter' discovered | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
A major milestone has been achieved in understanding genomic "dark matter" -- called non-coding RNA.
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Oil and Gas Production Drives Arctic Ice Melt: Scientific American

Oil and Gas Production Drives Arctic Ice Melt: Scientific American | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Study suggests drilling for these fossil fuels is helping melt the arctic (Oil and Gas Production Drives Arctic Ice Melt http://t.co/C7Yzg3jSSV Books: Science & Math
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DNA survives critical entry into Earth's atmosphere

DNA survives critical entry into Earth's atmosphere | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
The genetic material DNA can survive a flight through space and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere -- and still pass on genetic information. Scientists obtained these astonishing results during an experiment on the TEXUS-49 research rocket mission.
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Penicillin tactics revealed by scientists

Penicillin tactics revealed by scientists | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
One of the oldest and most widely used antibiotics, penicillin, attacks enzymes that build the bacterial cell wall. Researchers have now shown that penicillin and its variants also set in motion a toxic malfunctioning of the cell's wall-building machinery, dooming the cell to a futile cycle of building and then immediately destroying that wall.
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New research paves the way for nano-movies of biomolecules

New research paves the way for nano-movies of biomolecules | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
An international team, including scientists from Arizona State University, the University of Milwaukee-Madison (UMW) and Germany’s Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), have caught a light se
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Researchers identify priority targets for immunotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer

Expression of MAGE cancer-testis antigens correlates with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer, researchers report, and that several of these unique proteins may prove to be prognostic factors for ovarian cancer.
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CDC and Texas Health Department confirm first Ebola case diagnosed in the U.S.

CDC and Texas Health Department confirm first Ebola case diagnosed in the U.S. | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed today, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from Liberia. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately four days after arriving in the U.S. on Sept. 20.
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Satellite measurements reveal gravity dip from ice loss in West Antarctica

Satellite measurements reveal gravity dip from ice loss in West Antarctica | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Although not designed to map changes in Earth's gravity over time, ESA's GOCE satellite has shown that the ice lost from West Antarctica over the last few years has left its signature. More than doubling its planned life in orbit, GOCE spent four years measuring Earth's gravity in unprecedented detail. Researchers have found that the decrease in the mass of ice during this period was mirrored in GOCE's measurements.
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BioTechniques - Revving up DNA Polymerase with a New Speedometer

BioTechniques - Revving up DNA Polymerase with a New Speedometer | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new, real-time assay to measure the speed of DNA polymerase during PCR. Find out what they learned about enzymes, reaction conditions, and more...
Nalina Nagarajan's insight:

If one can speed up PCR reactions it would naturally make life easier for scientists :) It would make GWAS much easier too.

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A guide to genome engineering with programmable nucleases - Nature Rev. Gen.

A guide to genome engineering with programmable nucleases - Nature Rev. Gen. | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it

(via T. Lahaye, thx)

Kim & Kim 2014

Programmable nucleases — including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) system — enable targeted genetic modifications in cultured cells, as well as in whole animals and plants. The value of these enzymes in research, medicine and biotechnology arises from their ability to induce site-specific DNA cleavage in the genome, the repair (through endogenous mechanisms) of which allows high-precision genome editing. However, these nucleases differ in several respects, including their composition, targetable sites, specificities and mutation signatures, among other characteristics. Knowledge of nuclease-specific features, as well as of their pros and cons, is essential for researchers to choose the most appropriate tool for a range of applications.


Via dromius
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Fesquet didier's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:59 AM

a review of these amazing technique

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Researchers split water into hydrogen, oxygen using light, nanoparticles

Researchers split water into hydrogen, oxygen using light, nanoparticles | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a catalyst that can quickly generate hydrogen from water using sunlight, potentially creating a clean and renewable source of energy. Their research involved the use of cobalt oxide nanoparticles to split water into hydrogen and oxygen.
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New delivery for cancer drugs

New delivery for cancer drugs | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Nanopharmaceuticals are beginning to demonstrate their capacity to place the drugs directly in the tumor, where they will do the most good, rather than let them roam freely in the body.
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J Craig Venter wants to digitize DNA and transmit the signal to teleport organisms

J Craig Venter wants to digitize DNA and transmit the signal to teleport organisms | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it

Craig Venter states:

 

"As the industrial age is drawing to a close, I think that we're witnessing the dawn of the era of biological design. DNA, as digitized information, is accumulating in computer databases. Thanks to genetic engineering, and now the field of synthetic biology, we can manipulate DNA to an unprecedented extent, just as we can edit software in a computer. We can also transmit it as an electromagnetic wave at or near the speed of light and, via a "biological teleporter", use it to recreate proteins, viruses and living cells at another location, changing forever how we view life."

 

"At this point in time we are limited to making protein molecules, viruses, phages and single microbial cells, but the field will move to more complex living systems. I am confident that we will be able to convert digitised information into living cells that will become complex multicellular organisms or functioning tissues."

 

"We could send sequence information to a digital-biological converter on Mars in as little as 4.3 minutes, that's at the closest approach of the red planet, to provide colonists with personalised drugs. Or, if Nasa's Mars Curiosity rover were equipped with a DNA-sequencing device, it could transmit the digital code of a Martian microbe back to Earth, where we could recreate the organism in the laboratory. We can rebuild the Martians in a P4 spacesuit lab -- that is, a maximum-containment lab -- instead of risking them crash-landing on the surface. I am assuming that Martian life is, like life on Earth, based on DNA. I think that because we know that Earth and Mars have continually exchanged material, in the order of 100kg a year, making it likely that Earth microbes have travelled to and populated Martian oceans long ago and that Martian microbes have survived to thrive on Earth. Simple calculations indicate that there is as much biology and biomass in the subsurface of our Earth as in the entire visible world on the planet's surface. The same could be true for Mars."

 

"If the life-digitalizing technology works, then we will have a new means of exploring the universe and the Earth-sized exoplanets and super Earths. To get a sequencer to them soon is out of the question with present-day rocket technology -- the planets orbiting the red dwarf Gliese 581 are "only" about 22 light-years away -- but it would take only 22 years to get the beamed data back. And that if advanced DNA-based life does exist in that system, perhaps it has already been broadcasting sequence information."

 

"Creating life at the speed of light is part of a new industrial revolution. Manufacturing will shift from centralised factories to a distributed, domestic manufacturing future, thanks to the rise of 3D printer technology. Since my own genome was sequenced, my software has been broadcast into space in the form of electromagnetic waves, carrying my genetic information far beyond Earth. Whether there is any creature out there capable of making sense of the instructions in my genome, well, that's another question."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Dmitry Alexeev
Nalina Nagarajan's insight:

Star trekkies for real!

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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, November 1, 2013 4:01 AM

J Craig Venter has already been teleported))

I love him for his style of reporting simple deeds as awesome technologies) 

 

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Coma: researchers observe never-before-detected brain activity

Coma: researchers observe never-before-detected brain activity | Science - Interesting developments in Research | Scoop.it
Researchers have found brain activity beyond a flat line EEG, which they have called Nu-complexes (from the Greek letter n).
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