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27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding

27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding

Via Margarita Parra
Ness Crouch's insight:

Simple but useful.

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Cultus's comment, November 11, 2013 1:35 PM
The following infographic Mia MacMeekin offers up 27 additional ways to check for understanding. Some aren’t necessarily quick
Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:23 PM

Formative assessment to drive future instruction.  Love it!

Mary Clark's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:32 AM

Several of these would be easy to use with library lessons.

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Comet families similar to our own are found around another star

Comet families similar to our own are found around another star | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
A detailed study of comets orbiting the young nearby star Beta Pictoris is published today in the journal Nature, and it reveals striking similarities to the comets found in our solar system. Over the…
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By Jove! Can climate change lead us to life on other planets?

By Jove! Can climate change lead us to life on other planets? | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

Thanks to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report, we’ve recently heard a great deal about how the Earth’s climate is changing. The IPCC’s cautious assessment of the…

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Great background reading
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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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The Archaeology News Network: Countdown to Pluto

The Archaeology News Network: Countdown to Pluto | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
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It's very exciting that New Horizons will arrive at Pluto soon, July 2015 we will have  anew vision of this distant space object!

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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  All links archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:35 AM

I find the island biogeography to be really awesome because it's as if the small South Pacific islands are a completely separate world in terms of the creatures that live in the isolated environments.  Growing up, the idea of the Komodo Dragon was terrifying and amazing because lizards are just supposed to be little, ugly reptiles and the existence of one large enough to eat us and named after the beasts in fairytales was fascinating.  In Rhode Island, there isn't much in terms of exotic wildlife but even the species throughtout the rest of the U.S. don't completely compare to the rare creatures on the islands that have adapted to the conditions of living on small pieces of land.

The land bridge is something I don't recall ever hearing of before and the way that it influences the animals' evolution and expansion is fascinating.  I think of it in terms of humans because when immigrants cross seas to go to different countries, they are forced to adapt and they're families evolve differently than they would have in their homeland. The land bridge provided similar challenges for the marsupials and reptiles that are/were located on the secluded islands.

Once again, I also find myself extremely annoyed with man's habit of killing off rare species for the selfish reasons of owning land and not being hunted by the animals whose land they've encroached upon.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:04 PM

This video presentation gives a good description of why islands have a varied and different forms of species on the islands.  The isolation gives them a strong hold in their particular environment but this is a double edged sword because they lack predation or stronger comparators so they become very adapted to their place but cannot compete when a stronger adaptor for generalized environment comes to the island.  Like cats that are brought to the isolated island and then proceed to cause mass extinctions.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:03 PM

Just because the world island is in island biogeography doesn't mean it is only to be discussed and looked at on islands. There is great importance of exploring this specific part of geography on land that is not solely surrounded by water.

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197 Educational YouTube Channels You Should Know About

197 Educational YouTube Channels You Should Know About | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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This will take awhile to check through already found some useful ones!

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Arthur Correia's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:15 AM

 It's a reshare...and it won't be tha last :)!

carldowse's curator insight, January 16, 4:56 AM

Must be something there for us!

Judy Brown's curator insight, May 29, 7:32 PM

Autistic kids need to be shown lots of love and need a teacher who will treat them right.

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Flipped Learning Network

Flipped Learning Network | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
Flipped Learning Network Resource Page

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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 25, 2013 12:05 PM

As the technology grows more availalbe, the Flipped Learning Model offers some very intersting potential related to :Bring Your Own Device.  While in the process of solving a problem, a student can access the content material on a tablet, school computer or the student's own smart phone, right there in class.  This keeps it fresh and present when needed.

Jordi Castells's curator insight, August 25, 2013 2:47 PM

A free online professional learning community for teachers interested in flipped classrooms.

Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, August 25, 2013 3:57 PM

Faculty frequently mention having interest in a flipped classroom. This resource may be helpful in determining how to apply the concept in one's own class.

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NASA - NASA eClips™

NASA - NASA eClips™ | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
NASA.gov brings you images, videos and interactive features from the unique perspective of America’s space agency.
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Great NASA resource a variety of e-clips and podcasts about our world and space. 

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A New Record: The Largest Baby Star, Ever?

A New Record: The Largest Baby Star, Ever? | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
A New Record: The Largest Baby Star, Ever?
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Interesting article from National Geographic. 

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See one of the year's best meteor showers, thanks to Halley's comet

See one of the year's best meteor showers, thanks to Halley's comet | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
As Earth orbits the sun, it continually ploughs through dust and debris left behind by passing comets and asteroids. On any night of the year, a keen-eyed observer might see five, or even ten, meteors…
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For those who love watching the night sky this article will give you some information about where to see an upcoming meteor shower. 

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Earth's Cosmic Context

"Superclusters – regions of space that are densely packed with galaxies – are the biggest structures in the Universe. But scientists have struggled to define exactly where one supercluster ends and another begins. Now, a team based in Hawaii has come up with a new technique that maps the Universe according to the flow of galaxies across space. Redrawing the boundaries of the cosmic map, they redefine our home supercluster and name it Laniakea, which means ‘immeasurable heaven’ in Hawaiian.  Read the research paper here."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2:30 PM

Spatial thinking and geographic exploration is constantly seeking to understand place in context to other places.  More often than not, that is done without every venturing beyond this planet, but in many respects, space is the greatest of contexts on the grandest of scales for us to understand ourselves.  I first saw this video embedded in an NPR article and it filled me with wonder to think about the immensities of space and that the Earth is such a small little corner of the universe. 


Tags: space, scale, perspective

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Learning Never Stops: 50 websites that help make learning science fun

Learning Never Stops: 50 websites that help make learning science fun | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

hat 


Via Kathleen Cercone
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A great list of sites! I've found some new ones to add to my resource list. 

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, March 14, 11:53 AM

New websites for learning all kinds of topics!  Thanks Petra!

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How Many Earth-like planets are out there?

How Many Earth-like planets are out there? | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

"Astronomers using NASA data have calculated for the first time that in our galaxy alone, there are at least 8.8 billion stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable temperature zone.  For perspective, that's more Earth-like planets than there are people on Earth."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, December 20, 2013 9:20 AM

I love this kind of news. I just wish it was more scientific and less hyperbolic.

Here's my only gripe with this article. I can't believe someone like a UC Berkley planet hunter named Geoff Marcy would actually talk about the radio silence issue without somehow further qualifying it. It makes me wonder if Seth Borenstein of the AP and/or his editors may have left out some of the more important elements of that topic.

Personally, I find this anthropomorphic attitude about radio silence to be both ridiculous and insulting to the intellect.  

Just because we haven't picked up any electromagnetic signals doesn't mean there isn't life - or even intelligent life - in our galaxy or in the universe. How incredibly egotistical (and incredibly unscientific) it is to assume that life elsewhere will have evolved into beings like us. How silly it is to then assume that that intelligence would invent, just like our species did, technologies like radio, TV, satellite communications, and the like. Even more absurd and overlooked in this so-called question of silence is that that technology would have had to have been invented and put into use at precisely the point in THEIR evolution such that THEIR signals would be reaching us NOW so that we could detect them, assuming that we had the right technology to do so.

Let's put the "radio silence" question into the time and distance perspective of our own species. KDKA broadcast the first commercial radio signals from Pittsburgh in 1920. That's 93 years ago. That means those extremely weak signals would only be detectable as of now to a distance of 93 light years from us.

The Milky Way Galaxy is 120,000 light years across. Those signals have made it 0.075% of the way across our galaxy.

I don't doubt for one second that there's life in our galaxy and elsewhere in the universe, but can we please stop wondering why the Vulcans or Klingons or Romulans haven't shared reruns of their version of I Love Lucy?

Treathyl Fox's comment, December 20, 2013 9:57 AM
The NBC News SCIENCE article uses the word "habitable" but makes no mention of trees. I have a problem with that. :) Seriously!
Nicolle Kuna's curator insight, December 20, 2013 6:09 PM

That's more than enough planets for each one of us.  No doubt humanity will in time find a way to mine and devour these ones too. 

 

Nicolle, Converse Conserve.Com

Home of Eco-Creativity and Sustainability Education

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The Smithsonian Collection in 3D!

The Smithsonian Collection in 3D! | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

"The end of "do not touch": Use the Smithsonian X 3D Explorer to explore and manipulate museum objects like never before. Create and share your own scenes and print highly detailed replica of original Smithsonian collection pieces."


Via Beth Dichter
Ness Crouch's insight:

What a great site for looking at both history and science! Very recommended!

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Vicki Hansen's curator insight, November 24, 2013 7:42 PM

Awesome interactive for students.  Hope it continues to expand objects.

Van Duyse Olivier's curator insight, December 1, 2013 6:41 AM

The new digital museum ... Opens opportunity's for digital education

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 11, 7:26 AM

This is awesome.

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27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding

27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding

Via Margarita Parra
Ness Crouch's insight:

Simple but useful.

more...
Cultus's comment, November 11, 2013 1:35 PM
The following infographic Mia MacMeekin offers up 27 additional ways to check for understanding. Some aren’t necessarily quick
Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:23 PM

Formative assessment to drive future instruction.  Love it!

Mary Clark's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:32 AM

Several of these would be easy to use with library lessons.

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Scientists Capture Rare Photographs of Red Lightning

Scientists Capture Rare Photographs of Red Lightning | Science for Kids | Scoop.it

Sprites, also known as red lightning, are electrical discharges that appear as bursts of red light above clouds during thunderstorms.Because the weather phenomenon is so fleeting (sprites flash for just milliseconds) and for the most part not visible from the ground, they are difficult to observe and even more difficult to photograph, rather like the mischievous air spirits of the fantasy realm that they’re named for. Ahrns and his colleagues, however, have captured extremely rare photographs of the red lightning, using DSLR cameras and high speed video cameras positioned in the plane’s window. The researchers hope to learn more about the physical and chemical processes that give rise to sprites and other forms of upper atmospheric lightning.

 

What’s it like to capture images of some of nature’s most short-lived and erratic features? I questioned Ahrns over email, and he explained what sprites are, why they occur, how scientists find them and why he’s so interested in the elusive phenomena.

 

A sprite is a kind of upper atmosphere electrical discharge associated with thunderstorms. A large electric field, generated by some lightning strokes, ionizes the air high above the cloud, which then emits the light we see in the pictures. They obviously beg comparison to the regular lightning bolts we see all the time, but I like to point out that the sprites are much higher, with the tops reaching up to around 100 kilometers, and higher. A lightning bolt might stretch around 10 kilometers from the cloud to the ground, but a sprite can reach 50 kilometers tall.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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For First Time, Astronomers Read Exoplanet's Color

For First Time, Astronomers Read Exoplanet's Color | Science for Kids | Scoop.it
The color of a distant gas giant is close to that of Earth—but that's where the similarities with our planet ends.
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