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Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education - PLoS Blogs (blog)

Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education - PLoS Blogs (blog) | Science Education | Scoop.it
National Geographic
Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education
PLoS Blogs (blog)
Last year, I had a chance to speak at TEDxQueensu .
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Researchers discover way to allow 80 percent of sound to pass through walls

Researchers discover way to allow 80 percent of sound to pass through walls | Science Education | Scoop.it

A team of researchers in Korea has discovered a way to allow sound to pass through walls almost as if they were not there at all. As the group describes in their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the technique involves drilling very small holes in a wall and then tightly covering them with a thin sheet of plastic.

In this new effort, the researchers sought to extend prior research done by Thomas Ebbesen and colleagues in 1998 where it was discovered that holes, made in a metal sheet that were smaller than the wavelength of light shone on it, allowed more light to pass through than expected—a property that has come to be known as extraordinary optical transmission. Subsequent research found the principle did not apply to sound waves due to rigid parts of the barrier reflecting back most of the applied sound. The researchers on this new team suspected that altering certain aspects of the barrier might allow for the property to hold for sound after all.

They began by drilling several holes (10 millimeters in diameter) in a 5-millimeter -thick piece of metal. Next, they placed a speaker on one side of the "wall" and a microphone on the other. With just the holes, they found the wall blocked sound almost as effectively as if there were no holes drilled in it. Next, they covered one side of the wall with a thin tensioned membrane (plastic wrap). After playing the sound again, the researchers discovered that the addition of the membrane allowed much more sound to pass through the wall—on average 80 percent more—almost as if the wall weren't there at all.

 

The membrane, the team explains, allows for "zero resistance" as the sound encounters the holes. At the resonance frequency of the membrane (1200 hertz), air moved in the holes as if it had no mass at all. That in turn allowed sound waves to move through very quickly. The sound in the holes was actually concentrated as it passed through, suggesting that the technique might be used as a way to magnify small signals. One application of this discovery could be walls that serve as security barriers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Chris Upton + helpers's comment, June 24, 2013 1:57 PM
"80% more" than almost nothing, isn't much - perhaps it's mis-written
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The Water-Repelling Spray That's A Mix Of Science And Outright ...

The Water-Repelling Spray That's A Mix Of Science And Outright ... | Science Education | Scoop.it
I've seen a video demonstration of NeverWet before, but never a demonstration as all-inclusive as this one, posted about a week ago. The product, which is arriving (or has already arrived) in Home Depot and Red Rose ...
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Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education - PLoS Blogs (blog)

Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education - PLoS Blogs (blog) | Science Education | Scoop.it
National Geographic
Science and Storytelling: The use of stories in science education
PLoS Blogs (blog)
Last year, I had a chance to speak at TEDxQueensu .
more...
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Rescooped by Brett Loughman from Amazing Science
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Light wheel - new type of light wave extends the possibilities in nanotechnology

Light wheel - new type of light wave extends the possibilities in nanotechnology | Science Education | Scoop.it

Propeller or wheel? In circularly polarized light, the vector which represents the electric field of the light wave (blue arrows in above figure) rotates helically in the direction of propagation. Such an electromagnetic wave has longitudinal angular momentum. If two circularly polarised waves rotating in opposite directions meet at a focal point, light with purely transverse angular momentum is generated. Its electric field vector rotates about an axis perpendicular to the direction of propagation like a bicycle spoke.

Light in general can exert incredible forces. According to the rules of quantum mechanics, light is an electromagnetic wave, as well as a stream of photons. Since it has momentum, a transparent particle through which a light beam falls experiences a recoil when the photons leave it. Although the force which a photon exerts in this process is almost infinitesimal, the effect of innumerable light particles in intense and tightly focused laser beams adds up in such a way that objects up to a few micrometres can be held in an optical trap or moved in a specific way. Biologists, for example, use this effect in optical tweezers to fix cells and rotate them at the focus of a microscope. To this effect, scientists working with Gerd Leuchs, Director at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, are now creating new possibilities for them.

 

The team has created a photonic wheel, i.e. light with purely transverse angular momentum: the electric field of the electromagnetic wave rotates about an axis whose orientation is perpendicular to the direction of motion, just like the axis of a wheel. Until now, physicists have mainly been familiar with light with longitudinal angular momentum where the electric field rotates like a propeller around an axis aligned along the direction of motion. “The possibility that light can have purely transverse angular momentum when averaged over the complete cross-section of the beam had not been realised before,” says Peter Banzer, who made a significant contribution to the discovery.

 

This is because, as the Erlangen-based physicists have now shown both theoretically and practically, it is indeed possible to generate light with purely transverse angular momentum - and what’s more it is surprisingly easy to do so. “Once it’s down on paper, it looks easy,” says Gerd Leuchs. But somebody has to come up with the idea in the first place. The researchers are now developing this idea using circularly polarised light. A wave of circularly polarised light turns like a screw around the direction of beam propagation and has propeller-like longitudinal angular momentum. Light with circular polarisation can be generated with the aid of a birefringent crystal, for example.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ivan Koh's curator insight, June 30, 2013 5:47 PM

This article is about telling that using light manipulation, we may be able to utilise nanotechnology. It goes down into the scientific terms of how its done and how it can be used to benefit other things. I think the factors leading to the realization of reaching the possibilities is mostly still limited to science. One may come up with an idea but if it cannot be proven theoretically or scientifically, then its still far from being a possibility.
I wonder then how some science discovery and breakthrough happened through accidents.