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Animated bacteria GIF: What lies within? Glycolysis edition

Related articles Animated bacteria GIF: What lies within (mhrussel.wordpress.com) Animated GIF: Bacteria swimming (mhrussel.wordpress.com)
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Infographic: You vs. Your Microbiome

Infographic: You vs. Your Microbiome | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
  A simple illustration of what your genome is up against. This is a representation of the proportion of your DNA (in red) in relation to the 10,000 or so bacteria that live in or on you (in b...
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8 Educational Apps To Create Digital Portfolios

8 Educational Apps To Create Digital Portfolios | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
8 Educational Apps To Create Digital Portfolios

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , susandauria
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Taking the good with the bad: when beneficial bacteria do bad things on the side

Taking the good with the bad: when beneficial bacteria do bad things on the side | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
If you have followed this blog at all, you will know my passion for highlighting the important and beneficial aspects of bacteria. You know, those too-small-to-see factories (or circuses) that we h...
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Simple animated GIF for "The Bacterial Circus"

  A simple GIF to give a look at the complexity of a 1000-ring circus going on in cells all the time. Each 'ring' is a different pathway necessary for this generic microbe to survive. Wish I h...
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Updated animated bacterial chemotaxis GIFs

A blog about science, education, technology, and climate change (by Matt Russell)
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How many rings in a bacterial circus?

How many rings in a bacterial circus? | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
My family and I recently went to a circus. It had one ring, and that was manageable. We have also been to a traditional three ring circus in the past. Personally, I felt there was too much going on...
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Metagenomics exlpained with GIF animation

  In order to determine the ~99% of bacteria in the environment we do not know about, one approach to overcome this challenge is called metagenomics. The above (amateur) animation tries to ill...
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Let’s Find Out What Science Outreach Can Accomplish : Soapbox Science

Let’s Find Out What Science Outreach Can Accomplish : Soapbox Science | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Matt Shipman is a public information officer at North Carolina State University, where he writes about everything from forensic entomology to computer malware. He previously worked as a reporter and editor in the Washington, D.C.

Via Jennifer Davison
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PLOS Biology: Parallel Evolutionary Dynamics of Adaptive Diversification in Escherichia coli

PLOS Biology: Parallel Evolutionary Dynamics of Adaptive Diversification in Escherichia coli | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
PLOS Biology is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal that features works of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems, including works at the interface with other disciplines.
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Bacteria Chemotaxis Explained with Animated GIFs. Bacterial Behavior in Motion

   
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Revealing the secrets of motility in archaea

Revealing the secrets of motility in archaea | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—The protein structure of the motor that propels archaea has been characterized for the first time by a team of scientists from the U.S.
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Dogs Understand Human Perspective, Study Suggests

Dogs Understand Human Perspective, Study Suggests | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it

A recent study reveals that dogs are much likely to steal food in the dark when humans cannot notice them, indicating they understand a human's perspective.

 

The study, conducted by Dr. Juliane Kaminski of the University of Portsmouth's Department of Psychology, claims that when humans forbid the dog from eating the food, he is four times more likely to steal the food that he was forbidden to eat in the dark. This behavior in dogs reveals that they can change their actions based on what humans think and feel. They take into account what humans can see and what they cannot.

 

"That's incredible because it implies dogs understand the human can't see them, meaning they might understand the human perspective," Dr. Kaminski said in a press statement.

 

This study, funded by the Max Planck Society, is the first that describes how dogs distinguish between different levels of light when they are making strategies to steal food. According to Dr. Kaminski, humans attribute a few qualities and emotions to other living things. It is we who think that the dogs are clever or sensitive, not the dogs themselves.

 

A series of experiments were conducted in different light conditions. In each test, the humans forbade the dog from eating the food. On conducting these tests, she noticed that the dog ate more food in the dark and that too quickly, as compared to when the room was lit.

 

The study had 42 female and 42 male domestic dogs who were 1-year-old or more. She made sure she selected those dogs that were comfortable without their owner, even if it was a dark room. The report states that the tests were complex and involved many variables to rule out that dogs were basing their decisions on simple associative rules, for example, that dark means food. It is not known how well dogs can see in the dark, but the study shows that they can differentiate between light and dark.

 

The researcher concludes saying, "The results of these tests suggest that dogs are deciding it's safer to steal the food when the room is dark because they understand something of the human's perspective." Further studies have to be conducted in order to discover the mechanism that controls the dog's behavior. Previous studies have indicated that dogs consider human's eyes as an important signal in deciding how to behave. For those people who are attentive toward dogs, the animal responds more willingly.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Sakis Koukouvis
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Greg Wurn's comment, February 14, 2013 3:33 PM
I lived on a property with tall open forest all around for 20 years, my dogs used to regurlary chase after other animals that came near the camp, they would tear off into what appeared to me to be pitch dark, not once in 20 years did any of my dogs injure themselves on fallen branches etc, I suspect that they can see very well in the dark !
Vasileios Basios's comment, February 18, 2013 8:16 AM
... but not vice versa .. we can safely pressume ;-)
KathyTarochione's curator insight, March 4, 2013 4:35 PM

Charlie could have told you this.  He knows it's true.  Hey, just ask Charlie.

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Animated bacteria GIF: What lies within

  In case you haven't noticed, since discovering how to make animated GIFs a couple weeks ago, I can't stop. This one is a simple reminder that bacteria may be small, but if you look close eno...
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Bacterial aerotaxis in an oxygen gradient animated GIF. Enjoy!

For example, Azospirillum brasilense is considered microaerophilic meaning it prefers an environment with a low amount of oxygen. When these cells are placed in a capillary tube, the motile cells n...
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How do bacteria make decisions? Part 4: Getting the message

How do bacteria make decisions? Part 4: Getting the message | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Welcome to part 4 of how bacteria make decisions. Parts 1 and 2 dealt with chemotaxis. Part 3 was a look at two component signaling systems. This part will deal with my favorite aspect of bacterial...
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The biggest ring under the little Big Top: The bacterial circus revisited

The biggest ring under the little Big Top: The bacterial circus revisited | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Continuing on the theme that bacteria are Nature's smallest circus, I want to highlight the most glaring problem with our knowledge of these 2000 ring circuses. We have discussed how proteins encod...
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MyTH: Week 5 focus is Pseudomonas aeruginosa

MyTH: Week 5 focus is Pseudomonas aeruginosa | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Time again for My Tiny Highlight (MyTH) of a particular bacterium. This week is the infamous Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This trooper can be found almost anywhere on earth due to its ability to use all...
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Model of Geobacter spp. oxidative metabolism coupled to soluble extracellular metal reduction

Model of Geobacter spp. oxidative metabolism coupled to soluble extracellular metal reduction | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Here is a model of the extracellular metal reduction ring and oxidative metabolism ring within the Geobacter circus.     Related articles MyTH: Week 4 bacteria highlight: Geobacter spp. (...
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How Do Bacteria Make Decisions? Part 3

How Do Bacteria Make Decisions? Part 3 | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it
Time for Part 3 in the series examining how bacteria make decisions. Parts 1 and 2 focused on chemotaxis. Today, we will focus on how bacteria decide which genes need to be expressed and which need...
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MyTH: Week 4 bacteria highlight: Geobacter spp.

Welcome to Week 4 of My Tiny Highlight (MyTH) series. This week I will focus on not a species. Instead, I will focus on a genera; Geobacter. Like the previous highlights, Geobacter are proteobacter...
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Animated GIF: Extracellular electron transfer to soluble iron. Example of Geobacter respiration

  When Geobacter are in an environment where soluble iron is present, this can serve as the terminal electron acceptor in metabolism through an elaborate electron highway.
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Another animated GIF: growing iron oxide on Geobacter pili: bacterial nanowires

A blog about science, education, technology, and climate change (by Matt Russell)
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Molecules generated that can halt metastasis of colon cancer

Medical researchers have managed to halt the progress of colon cancer and its metastasis in the liver in an experimental model with mice.
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How to turn living cells into computers - Nature.com

How to turn living cells into computers - Nature.com | Science Education and Communication | Scoop.it

Synthetic biologists have developed DNA modules that perform logic operations in living cells.


Via Marko Dolinar
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