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Science Matters
News and interesting articles about science for educational use.
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New Giant Volcano Below Sea Is Largest in the World

New Giant Volcano Below Sea Is Largest in the World | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Tamu Massif in the northwest Pacific challenges traditional views of ocean science.
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Jurassic squirrel's secret is out after 165m years

Jurassic squirrel's secret is out after 165m years | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Discovery of furry animal with sharp teeth and poisonous spur provides more clues to the evolution of mammals (Jurassic squirrel's secret is out after 165m years http://t.co/tyw2EiZGIo)...
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Common genetic ancestors lived during roughly same time period

Common genetic ancestors lived during roughly same time period | Science Matters | Scoop.it

Mitochondrial Eve and Y-chromosomal Adam—two individuals who passed down a portion of their genomes to the vast expanse of humanity—are known as our most recent common ancestors, or MRCAs.


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Young blood really is the key to youth - health - 18 October 2012 - New Scientist

Young blood really is the key to youth - health - 18 October 2012 - New Scientist | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Giving old mice young blood reverses age-related cognitive decline...
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DNA's half-life identified using fossil bones - life - 10 October 2012 - New Scientist

DNA's half-life identified using fossil bones - life - 10 October 2012 - New Scientist | Science Matters | Scoop.it
If DNA has a half-life that suggests the molecules can survive far longer than anyone thought, maybe 6 million years...
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History of Earth in 24-hour clock

History of Earth in 24-hour clock | Science Matters | Scoop.it
The insignificance of humans in the big(ish, only earth time-frame,never mind cosmos) picture http://t.co/px11AkMV http://t.co/LwUKhu8i...
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El hombre de Denisova tenía una diversidad genética limitada.

El hombre de Denisova tenía una diversidad genética limitada. | Science Matters | Scoop.it

Investigadores lograron descifrar el genoma de un homínido primitivo, el hombre de Denisova, y compararlo con el de los hombres de Neanderthal y los seres humanos modernos, usando una muestra de ADN extraída de un hueso que tiene unos 80,000 años.


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Un fracaso evolutivo: un animal de cuatro patas que no podía caminar

Un fracaso evolutivo: un animal de cuatro patas que no podía caminar | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Uno de nuestros más distantes antepasados, el Ichthyostega, es también uno de los primeros tetrápodos que pisaron tierra.
Hasta hace poco, se creyó que esta criatura reptaba sobre el barro en cuatro patas como una salamandra. Pero las primeras reconstrucciones en 3-D del esqueleto del Ichthyostega indican que su antebrazo no podía rotar y doblarse lo suficiente como para que el animal anduviera en cuatro patas.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Hockey Geometry

Hockey Geometry | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Players in every position of the game are constantly using geometry to make passes and take shots on goal...

Via Cornélia Castro
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Ancient 'Loch Ness Monster' Suffered Arthritis

Ancient 'Loch Ness Monster' Suffered Arthritis | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Ancient creatures resembling stout-necked Loch Ness Monsters apparently developed arthritis in their monster jaws, revealing that even such lethal killers...

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Abelhas são capazes de manipular ideias abstratas, como os mamíferos - Ciência - iG

Abelhas são capazes de manipular ideias abstratas, como os mamíferos - Ciência - iG | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Pesquisa feita em insetos demonstrou que análises cognitivas sofisticadas são possíveis mesmo na ausência de linguagem...
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New study traces the evolutionary history of what mammals eat

New study traces the evolutionary history of what mammals eat | Science Matters | Scoop.it
The feeding habits of mammals haven't always been what they are today, particularly for omnivores, finds a new study.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Giant Prehistoric Penguins Stood Nearly 5 Feet Tall

Giant Prehistoric Penguins Stood Nearly 5 Feet Tall | Science Matters | Scoop.it
By Katie Scott, Wired UKPaleontologists have constructed a model of a prehistoric penguin that stood almost 4 feet 6 inches tall when it liv...

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BT-R3 mediates killing of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae by Bacillus thuringiensis

BT-R3 mediates killing of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae by Bacillus thuringiensis | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), led by Dr. Lee Bulla, have demonstrated for the first time the selective cytotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry4B toxin is mediated by BT-R3.
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NASA | Seeing Photosynthesis from Space

NASA scientists have discovered a new way to use satellites to measure what's occurring inside Earth's land plants at a cellular level. During photosynthesis...

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New camera detects chemicals based on characteristic spectral fingerprints from chemical substances

New camera detects chemicals based on characteristic spectral fingerprints from chemical substances | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Imagine if you could just breathe on a little device and it would tell you whether you had asthma or lung cancer. If only you could point a camera to a fish to find out if it’s tainted. Or how about photographing the smoke from a chimney or an exhaust pipe and immediately be able to identify which pollutants are being emitted?

 

All this could become possible thanks to an invention by three scientists from the Department of Photonics Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU).

 

They have invented an extremely sensitive and compact camera accessory, which can capture radiation in the mid-infrared region, and can be used to identify a wide range of chemicals from a distance.

 

The device operates by detecting the characteristic spectral fingerprints emitted by chemical substances. Gas molecules vibrate in very specific ways. When they do, they absorb or emit an infrared light corresponding to the vibrational mode of the individual molecule. Measuring this light makes it possible to identify the type of gas. The camera can not only measure the radiation from the molecules, it can also reveal when the molecules absorb the radiation.

 

Post suggested by: http://www.scoop.it/u/leonardo-martins


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jennifer Moss
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The lenses technology on the REDBULL STRATOS mission

The lenses technology on the REDBULL STRATOS mission | Science Matters | Scoop.it
by: Fito Pardo A.M.C. I don’t know you, but I am clueless and curious of what those lenses are, did you see the lens with the RED ONE camera? that looks like a 8000mm,  something like that  o...

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Gurdon and Yamanaka Win Nobel Prize for Stem Cell Research

Gurdon and Yamanaka Win Nobel Prize for Stem Cell Research | Science Matters | Scoop.it

Shinya Yamanaka and John B. Gurdon, the two scientists who were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday, helped lay the foundation for regenerative medicine.


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Earth's Inconstant Magnetic Field And The Drift Of The Magnetic North Pole

Earth's Inconstant Magnetic Field And The Drift Of The Magnetic North Pole | Science Matters | Scoop.it

Our planet's magnetic field is in a constant state of change, say researchers who are beginning to understand how it behaves and why.

 

Every few years, scientist Larry Newitt of the Geological Survey of Canada goes hunting. He grabs his gloves, parka, a fancy compass, hops on a plane and flies out over the Canadian arctic. Not much stirs among the scattered islands and sea ice, but Newitt's prey is there--always moving, shifting, elusive. His quarry is Earth's north magnetic pole. Scientists have long known that the magnetic pole moves. James Ross located the pole for the first time in 1831 after an exhausting arctic journey during which his ship got stuck in the ice for four years. No one returned until the next century. In 1904, Roald Amundsen found the pole again and discovered that it had moved--at least 50 km since the days of Ross.

 

The pole kept going during the 20th century, north at an average speed of 10 km per year, lately accelerating "to 40 km per year," says Newitt. At this rate it will exit North America and reach Siberia in a few decades. Keeping track of the north magnetic pole is Newitt's job. "We usually go out and check its location once every few years," he says. "We'll have to make more trips now that it is moving so quickly." Earth's magnetic field is changing in other ways, too: Compass needles in Africa, for instance, are drifting about 1 degree per decade. And globally the magnetic field has weakened 10% since the 19th century. When this was mentioned by researchers at a recent meeting of the American Geophysical Union, many newspapers carried the story. A typical headline: "Is Earth's magnetic field collapsing?" Probably not. As remarkable as these changes sound, "they're mild compared to what Earth's magnetic field has done in the past," says University of California professor Gary Glatzmaier.

 

Sometimes the the whole magnetic field of Earth completely flips. The north and the south poles swap places. Such reversals, recorded in the magnetism of ancient rocks, are unpredictable. They come at irregular intervals averaging about 300,000 years; the last one was 780,000 years ago. Are we overdue for another? No one knows.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, ABroaderView, Sakis Koukouvis
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Robert T. Preston's curator insight, June 2, 2013 11:18 AM

The magnetic North Pole is ever on the move, and always has been.  See where it's been, where it's headed, and get a glimpse into why.

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CERN confirms existence of new particle consistent with Higgs boson (video)

CERN confirms existence of new particle consistent with Higgs boson (video) | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Physics' big announcement had more in common with a leaky product launch than the serious business of re-writing the science books.
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Gut Bacteria Regulate Happiness

Gut Bacteria Regulate Happiness | Science Matters | Scoop.it
APC scientists have shown that brain levels of serotonin, the ‘happy hormone’ are regulated by the amount of bacteria in the gut during early life.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Gina Stepp's comment, June 12, 2012 8:08 PM
Interesting . . . especially considering that gut regulation and other emotion-related processes are affected by early-life bonding (attachment . . . relationships). You can't separate bodily health from mental health in the end.
Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, June 13, 2012 1:38 PM
Many thanks!
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Better and New Video of the Enigmatic Placental Jellyfish

Better and New Video of the Enigmatic Placental Jellyfish | Science Matters | Scoop.it

Last week, a video of this mysterious blob floating 5000 feet under the sea was all over the Internet. Was it a whale placenta? A jellyfish? After some collective ooing and aahing, folks on the interwebs put their thinking hats on. Craig McClain at Deep Sea News dug through the literature and found a 1988 paper describing just such a jellyfish, calling it Deepstaria reticulum.

Now the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has posted a stunning video of Deepstaria jellyfish. Watch it to learn more about Deepstaria—and to look at pretty images. Win win for a Friday afternoon.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Como um tsunami salvou uma cidade grega há 2.500 anos

Como um tsunami salvou uma cidade grega há 2.500 anos | Science Matters | Scoop.it
Quando ondas tomaram tamanhos quase titânicos e salvaram uma cidade grega das garras de um exército persa há aproximadamente 2.500 anos, Heródoto registrou o evento como um ato de misericórdia do deus dos mares, Poseidon...
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33rd Square | Synthetic DNA, XNA May Allow Synthetic Lifeforms

33rd Square | Synthetic DNA, XNA May Allow Synthetic Lifeforms | Science Matters | Scoop.it

The new material, dubbed XNA is capable of replication and evolution, and may be the basis of new forms of synthetic life.


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Génétique : tous les hommes sont Africains et frères

Génétique : tous les hommes sont Africains et frères | Science Matters | Scoop.it

L’homme moderne c’est-à-dire toute la population terrestre sans exception, noirs, blancs, jaunes, peaux rouges sont des descendants d’un groupe de quelques 10 000 Africains noirs environ. L’équivalent d’un grand village congolais. Ce groupe a marqué de son empreinte indélébile la planète toute entière…


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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