Science du coaching
29 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

N'hésitez pas à critiquer vos collaborateurs de façon constructive - HBR

N'hésitez pas à critiquer vos collaborateurs de façon constructive - HBR | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

"Qu’est-ce qui est préférable aux yeux des gens : recevoir des compliments sur leur travail, ou des suggestions qui leur permettront de s’améliorer?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

Leadership : ce qu’attendent les salariés français de leurs managers

Leadership : ce qu’attendent les salariés français de leurs managers | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

"Le leadership à la française est-il en crise ? C’est à cette question que répond l’étude "La révolution du leadership", menée par deux chercheuses de l’Edhec. Selon elles, la transformation des organisations modifie les attentes des salariées. Découvrez les qualités que les leaders de demain doivent développer."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

My secret to getting rid of burnout permanently

My secret to getting rid of burnout permanently | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Recently, I found a secret and since that "ah ha!" moment, things have changed for me. I don
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

What God does to your brain - Telegraph

What God does to your brain - Telegraph | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
The controversial science of neurotheology aims to find the answer to an age-old question: why do we believe?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

27 Productive Things You Can Do in 5 Minutes

27 Productive Things You Can Do in 5 Minutes | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Have five spare minutes before a meeting? Don't waste them—try one of these productive to-dos instead.

Via Barb Jemmott
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

Le leadership dans Star Wars - Antonin GAUNAND

Le leadership dans Star Wars - Antonin GAUNAND | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
La guerre fait rage entre l'Empire et la Rébellion, le sort de la galaxie dépend de l'affrontement de deux modèles de leadership radicalement opposés.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

What is Good Leadership? Introverts Break it Down

Sign up for our WellCast newsletter for more of the love, lolz and happy! http://goo.gl/GTLhb What makes a good leader? A booming voice? A strong resolve? An...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

How Positive Thoughts Build Skills, Boost Health, and Improve Work

How Positive Thoughts Build Skills, Boost Health, and Improve Work | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Positive thinking sounds useful on the surface. (Most of us would prefer to be positive rather than negative.) But “positive thinking” is also a soft and fluffy term that's easy to dismiss. In the real world, it rarely carries the same weight as words like “work ethic” or “persistence.” But those views may be changing.

Via Barb Jemmott
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

As Technology Gets Better, Will Society Get Worse?

As Technology Gets Better, Will Society Get Worse? | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

Imagine that two people are carving a six-foot slab of wood at the same time. One is using a hand-chisel, the other, a chainsaw. If you are interested in the future of that slab, whom would you watch?

 

This chainsaw/chisel logic has led some to suggest that technological evolution is more important to humanity’s near future than biological evolution; nowadays, it is not the biological chisel but the technological chainsaw that is most quickly redefining what it means to be human. The devices we use change the way we live much faster than any contest among genes.

 

The problem with technological evolution is that it is under our control, and we don’t always make the best decisions.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

Why the Future of Your Business Depends on Curiosity

Why the Future of Your Business Depends on Curiosity | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

The future will be less about money, power or size, but more about agility, networking and sharing. In order to survive, businesses need to grow to a permanent state of curiosity, making it a core strategic competence.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Jacob Theilgaard's curator insight, January 30, 2014 4:45 AM

From an energy foundation to and information foundation....

David Hain's curator insight, January 31, 2014 5:45 AM

The curious will inherit the earth...

Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

C'est quoi un bon coach ? 10 idées reçues décryptées par Sam Sumyk

« Je considère qu'il n'y a pas de bons coaches, cela impliquerait qu'il y en ait de mauvais. Non, il y a de bons et de moins bons joueurs. A charge au coach de rendre meilleur celui qui l'est moins, ce qui implique des dizaines de paramètres à harmoniser. »

Jerome Lena's insight:

C'est ici un coach sportif qui parle, mais je pense qu'un coach en entreprise peut se poser les mêmes questions et méditer avec profit sur les réponses - sérieuses ou humoristiques - qu'il y apporterait.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

L'Indice de la Philanthropie Individuelle 2014

L'Indice de la Philanthropie Individuelle 2014 | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Pour la seconde année consécutive, BNP Paribas lance le « Individual Philanthropy Index » (Indice de la Philanthropie Individuelle) qui mesure l'engagement de philanthropes en Europe, aux Etats-Unis, au Moyen-Orient et en Asie.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently

7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

What makes a real difference in reaching your potential is an ability to be a smart learner. See what smart learners do differently and what they can teach us.


Via David Hain
more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 22, 2014 6:14 PM

They do all those things and probably many more.

donhornsby's curator insight, February 22, 2014 10:58 PM

(From the article): People often divide their time between learning and non-learning. Learning is usually much more focused, dedicated time. Even our education systems are built around that concept — first we learn for several years, and then we work. Smart learners do it differently. They use every occasion to learn something new — about the food they eat, the way things work, different cultures, different roles in the same organization, history, and the people around them. The world is a great source of knowledge and skills, available 24/7, so they ask tons of questions and connect the dots.

Don Cloud's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:36 AM

Learning is a journey, not a destination.

Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

Le CPF "m'a tuer" - Le Huffington Post

Le CPF "m'a tuer" - Le Huffington Post | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

 

"Alors qu'une loi sur les risques psycho-sociaux impose des actions d'amélioration des conditions de travail, les formations de développement personnel sortent du champ du CPF. (...) Alors que l'utilité du coaching est reconnue, qu'il intègre depuis longtemps la sphère publique et qu'il est souvent proposé sous l'appellation de formation individuelle, le coaching est exclu du CPF."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

Du Leadership à la Sociologie : 7 disciplines utiles au travail

7 disciplines utiles au travail : Sociologie - Psychologie du Travail - Intelligence Émotionnelle - Psychodynamique du Travail - Ergonomie - Process Communication - Leadership.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

How to Motivate Yourself: 3 Steps Backed By Science

How to Motivate Yourself: 3 Steps Backed By Science | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
You make goals… but then you procrastinate. You write a to-do list… but then you don’t follow through. And this happens again and again and again.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
When 3,000 average citizens were asked to forecast global events, some consistently made predictions that turned out to be more accurate than those made with classified intelligence.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Whole Brain Thinking
Scoop.it!

Stay Focused: 8 Ways To Boost Your Attention Span

Stay Focused: 8 Ways To Boost Your Attention Span | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
If you find yourself getting distracted and unable to concentrate on the task at hand, try these 8 tips to help you quickly get back on track.

Via David Ednie
more...
David Ednie's curator insight, January 30, 2014 11:22 AM

3. Take A Digital Sabbath:

The Internet is turning us into "chronic scatterbrains," says author Nicholas Carr inThe Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains, by promoting multitasking while quickly skimming for information and discouraging deep reflection, contemplation or more conceptual thought processes. 

http://www.slideshare.net/dednie/collaborating-in-thecloudwithlync

Scooped by Jerome Lena
Scoop.it!

Sitting Is the Smoking of Our Generation

Sitting Is the Smoking of Our Generation | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Changing your work environment will make you healthier, and more creative.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Intelligence économique & stratégique - Stratégie d'innovation
Scoop.it!

L'envie de leadership

L'envie de leadership | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

Il me semble que l’envie de leadership qui traverse aujourd’hui les organisations, et tout le pays relève moins de l’envie d’un leader providentiel que d’envie de peser sur nos destins individuels. A chaque fois que les leaders officiels, qu’on devrait dépouiller de l’appellation de leader au profit de celle de chefs, de dirigeants, de politiques, ou de représentants syndicaux pour éviter la confusion de rôle, donc à chaque fois que les personnes en situation de donner des ordres le font et que ces derniers dégradent la perspective de chacun de se projeter ou d’être maître de ses choix, alors ils dégradent le vivre ensemble et l’envie de s’engager. A quoi bon obéir à une autorité qui ne me protège pas, qui n’augmente pas mon pouvoir d’agir et d’exercer ma liberté ?


Via Stéphane NEREAU
more...
Stéphane NEREAU's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:31 PM

L’envie de leadership est à construire dès l’école par un rapprochement des individus entre eux dès cette étape cruciale de la vie. Elle doit s’exprimer pour le bénéfice de chacun, dans les valeurs nationales de la république qui demeure le socle à partager. Pour cela les méthodes d’enseignements doivent être revues et se préoccuper de comment chacun contribue au groupe. Il s’agit de faire de l’individualisme une éthique au profit du collectif et pas seulement un moteur de la consommation qui génère une compétition sans fin.

Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Personal Development | Self-Help | Habit Change
Scoop.it!

The Ultimate Guide to Building Willpower

The Ultimate Guide to Building Willpower | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

Willpower can drive you and help you accimplish great things.  But what drives whillpower and how can you increase your willpower to the next level


Via Change My Bad Habits
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Positive futures
Scoop.it!

Happiness May Be Different For Each Person. But There Is A Science Behind It We Can't Deny

Happiness May Be Different For Each Person. But There Is A Science Behind It We Can't Deny | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

While true happiness may have a different definition to each of us, science can give us a glimpse at the underlying biological factors behind happiness.


Via David Hain
more...
Brian Martin's curator insight, February 3, 2014 8:27 AM

Some great insight into how to create and sustain an overall sense of wellbeing.

Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Brain responds to tiniest speech details

Brain responds to tiniest speech details | Science du coaching | Scoop.it
Scientists begin to unravel how neurons recognize specific language sounds.

 

The sounds that make up speech, built from slight variations in vowels and consonants, trigger specific responses in the part of the brain responsible for speech processing, researchers report today in Science. Phonemes — such as the 'buh' sound in 'bad' or the 'duh' in 'dad' — are thought to be the smallest linguistic elements that change a word's meaning. But the study suggests that the brain's superior temporal gyrus can recognize even smaller bits of speech, called features, that may be common across languages.


“We’ve known for a pretty long time now what area of the brain is really important for processing speech sounds,” says lead author Edward Chang, a neuroscientist at the University of California in San Francisco. “What we haven’t known is the details about how individual sounds are processed.”


Chang's team made the discovery by working with six patients who were preparing to undergo brain surgery to treat epilepsy. An array of electrodes was implanted in the brain of each person as part of pre-surgical testing. Each volunteer then listened to speech samples comprising 500 sentences spoken by 400 people that covered the entire inventory of phonetic American English sounds.


When researchers compared the electrode data to the different phonemes heard by the volunteers, they found that phonemes with similar features seemed to elicit characteristic electric responses in neurons located within each patient's superior temporal gyrus.


Chang sees this as the starting point for understanding the mechanism that underlies the brain's seemingly effortless decoding of a stream of speech. “One of the things that happens in speech and language is that we transform sounds into meaning,” he says. A set of feature units in some combination gives rise to a phoneme; those combine to create a word, and together, groups of words create meaning.


Josef Rauschecker, a neuroscientist at Georgetown University in Washington DC, notes that monkeys are known to have neurons that respond to phonetic features. The discovery of a similar capability in the human brain opens the door to studying the evolution of speech recognition, he says.

 

Identifying the neural mechanisms that make up normal phonetic coding in the brain can lead to a better understanding of abnormalities, says Mitchell Steinschneider, a neuroscientist at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York. For people with hearing loss, for instance, this might mean the development of more sophisticated processors to aid artificial hearing, he adds.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Laura Perez's curator insight, January 31, 2014 5:48 AM

Parece que nuestro cerebro detecta fragmentos más pequeños que el fonema... Uou!

Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Unplug
Scoop.it!

Conversations on compassion: Jon Kabat-Zinn

Conversations on compassion: interviews with individuals who have contributed to changing the world.

Via craig daniels
more...
craig daniels's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:14 AM

When I think about compassion I see in my mind a window openning and the world rushing in. Practicing compassion will have the effect of  expanding your world of wonder and surprise.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:02 PM

This is a long video, but I am looking forward to watching it. I saw him present a year ago and it was great.

Rescooped by Jerome Lena from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

Thinking Outside the Box: A Misguided Idea

Thinking Outside the Box: A Misguided Idea | Science du coaching | Scoop.it

The truth behind the universal, but flawed, catchphrase for creativity.

 

In the early 1970s, a psychologist named J. P. Guilford was one of the first academic researchers who dared to conduct a study of creativity. One of Guilford’s most famous studies was the nine-dot puzzle. He challenged research subjects to connect all nine dots using just four straight lines without lifting their pencils from the page. Today many people are familiar with this puzzle and its solution. In the 1970s, however, very few were even aware of its existence, even though it had been around for almost a century.

 

If you have tried solving this puzzle, you can confirm that your first attempts usually involve sketching lines inside the imaginary square. The correct solution, however, requires you to draw lines that extend beyond the area defined by the dots.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
No comment yet.