Science Communica...
Follow
1.9K views | +1 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

Lost in Space: A Starless Planet Floats Alone

Lost in Space: A Starless Planet Floats Alone | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
A strange, free-range world is found...

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

First man on moon Neil Armstrong dead at 82: family

First man on moon Neil Armstrong dead at 82: family | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
(Reuters) - U.S.astronaut Neil Armstrong, who took a giant leap for mankind when he became the first person to walk on the moon, has died at the age of 82, his family said on Saturday.The family said...

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

NASA - "Earth As Art": beautiful picture book available as a free PDF download from NASA

NASA - "Earth As Art": beautiful picture book available as a free PDF download from NASA | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
The NASA Earth As Art collection features stunning images of Earth from five U.S. Earth-observing satellites.

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

Harvard Researchers Turn Book Into DNA Code - WSJ.com

Harvard Researchers Turn Book Into DNA Code - WSJ.com | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
In the latest attempt to corral society's growing quantities of digital data, Harvard University researchers encoded an entire book into the genetic molecules of DNA, the basic building block of life, and then accurately read back the text.

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Guest blogger: University autonomy in Austria – a review

Guest blogger: University autonomy in Austria – a  review | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Philipp Friedrich
This guest entry is written by Hedda master student Philipp Friedrich, who is currently a second year master student at the Hedda Master Programme in Higher Education.

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

UK universities failing to bridge culture gap for foreign students

UK universities failing to bridge culture gap for foreign students | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Admissions processes that focus on English language skills are missing the point. Many foreign students need help to adapt to new ways of learning and thinking

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Visualize the Return on Education

Visualize the Return on Education | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:04 AM

great visualisation of OECD's Education at a Glance datasets.

Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Beyond Student Recruitment: 5 Countries American Universities Should Watch in 2013

Beyond Student Recruitment: 5 Countries American Universities Should Watch in 2013 | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Following is a guest post by Allan E. Goodman, president of the Institute of International Education.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, January 9, 2013 5:24 AM

This is an excellent analysis by the president of IIE. It is interesting that it is not only US relevant as the title suggests.

A must read piece.

Rescooped by mdashf from Science News
Scoop.it!

ScienceCasts: Dark Lightning

Researchers studying thunderstorms have made a surprising discovery: The lightning we see with our eyes has a dark competitor that discharges storm clouds and flings antimatter into space. Astrophysicists and meteorologists are scrambling to understand "dark lightning."


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Astronomers Discover a Planet Almost Identical to Earth

Astronomers Discover a Planet Almost Identical to Earth | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Just over a week after astronomers boldly announced that they would discover an Earth twin elsewhere in the universe within the year, NASA's Kepler telescope spotted a pretty good candidate. Unglamorously named KOI 172.02 -- KOI stands for Kepler Object of Interest -- this planet is the most Earth-like planet astronomers have discovered yet.

 

The differences are slight. It's roughly 50 percent larger than Earth and orbits a star that closely resembles our own sun at a distance that would make the surface of the planet habitable. (The size makes it a "super Earth" rather than an "Earth twin.") With an 242-day long year, it's slightly closer to its star than the Earth is to the Sun but otherwise enjoys all of the same ideal conditions as we do, as far as astronomers can tell. "This was very exciting because it's our fist habitable-zone super Earth around a sun-type star," said Natalia Batalha, a Kepler co-investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center in California. "It's orbiting a star that's very much like our sun. Previously the ones we saw were orbiting other types of stars."

 

In a way, the discovery is a bit underwhelming thanks the recent flurry of exciting exoplanet news. We learned back in October that the closest star system to our own was home to several planets, including an Earth-sized planet. Then at the start of the new year, the team analyzing data from NASA's Kepler planer-finding space telescope announced the discovery of 461 new unconfirmed planets as well as the fact that that the Milky Way galaxy alone was home to more than 17 billion Earth-sized planets. They said they'd find an Earth twin among them by the end of the year. Compared to the days when we didn't know there were any other planets in the universe at all, and suddenly the chances that alien life exists start to look pretty strong. At least that's what the experts say. "It's a big deal -- It's definitely a good candidate for life," said astrophysicist Mario Livio about KOI 172.02. "Maybe there's no land life, but perhaps very clever dolphins."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
mdashf's insight:

We shall strive to know more about our existence

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Astronomers Awed by Colossal Galaxy Outburst 10-Times Brighter than Largest Supernova

Astronomers Awed by Colossal Galaxy Outburst 10-Times Brighter than Largest Supernova | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

The scientists were conducting a long-term study of molecules in galaxies  when one of the galaxies showed a startling change. "The discovery was entirely serendipitous. Our observations were spread over a few years, and when we looked at them, we found that one galaxy had changed over that time from being placid and quiescent, to undergoing a hugely energetic outburst at the end," said Robert Minchin, of Arecibo Observatory.

 

The scientists were using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) 305-meter William E. GordonTelescope at Arecibo for their study when they discovered the outburst in NGC 660, a spiral galaxy 44 million light-years distant in the constellation Pisces. The outburst was ten times brighter than the largest supernova, or exploding star. They reported their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Long Beach, California.

After detecting the outburst, the team continued to observe NGC 660 with the Arecibo Telescope, and also sought to determine the cause of the outburst using an international network of telescopes to make a detailed image of the galaxy.

 

"High-resolution imaging is the key to understanding what's going on," said Emmanuel Momjian, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "We needed to know if the outburst came from a supernova in this galaxy or from the galaxy's core. We could only do that by harnessing the high-resolution imaging power we get by joining widely-separated radio telescopes together."

 

The astronomers used a network called the High Sensitivity Array (HSA), composed of the NSF'sVery Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide system of ten radio telescopes ranging from Hawaii to the Virgin islands; the Arecibo Telescope; the NSF's 100-meter Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia; and the 100-meter Effelsberg Radio Telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

NASA: Cassini Suggests Icing on Hydrocarbon Lakes

NASA: Cassini Suggests Icing on Hydrocarbon Lakes | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
A new model by scientists working on NASA's Cassini mission finds that hydrocarbon ice might float on lakes on Saturn's largest moon.

 

It's not exactly icing on a cake, but it could be icing on a lake. A new paper by scientists on NASA's Cassini mission finds that blocks of hydrocarbon ice might decorate the surface of existing lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbon on Saturn's moon Titan. The presence of ice floes might explain some of the mixed readings Cassini has seen in the reflectivity of the surfaces of lakes on Titan.

 

"One of the most intriguing questions about these lakes and seas is whether they might host an exotic form of life," said Jonathan Lunine, a paper co-author and Cassini interdisciplinary Titan scientist at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. "And the formation of floating hydrocarbon ice will provide an opportunity for interesting chemistry along the boundary between liquid and solid, a boundary that may have been important in the origin of terrestrial life."

 

Titan is the only other body besides Earth in our solar system with stable bodies of liquid on its surface. But while our planet's cycle of precipitation and evaporation involves water, Titan's cycle involves hydrocarbons like ethane and methane. Ethane and methane are organic molecules, which scientists think can be building blocks for the more complex chemistry from which life arose. Cassini has seen a vast network of these hydrocarbon seas cover Titan's northern hemisphere, while a more sporadic set of lakes bejewels the southern hemisphere.

 

Up to this point, Cassini scientists assumed that Titan lakes would not have floating ice, because solid methane is denser than liquid methane and would sink. But the new model considers the interaction between the lakes and the atmosphere, resulting in different mixtures of compositions, pockets of nitrogen gas, and changes in temperature. The result, scientists found, is that winter ice will float in Titan's methane-and-ethane-rich lakes and seas if the temperature is below the freezing point of methane -- minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit (90.4 kelvins). The scientists realized all the varieties of ice they considered would float if they were composed of at least 5 percent "air," which is an average composition for young sea ice on Earth. ("Air" on Titan has significantly more nitrogen than Earth air and almost no oxygen.) If the temperature drops by just a few degrees, the ice will sink because of the relative proportions of nitrogen gas in the liquid versus the solid. Temperatures close to the freezing point of methane could lead to both floating and sinking ice – that is, a hydrocarbon ice crust above the liquid and blocks of hydrocarbon ice on the bottom of the lake bed. Scientists haven't entirely figured out what color the ice would be, though they suspect it would be colorless, as it is on Earth, perhaps tinted reddish-brown from Titan's atmosphere.

 

"We now know it's possible to get methane-and-ethane-rich ice freezing over on Titan in thin blocks that congeal together as it gets colder -- similar to what we see with Arctic sea ice at the onset of winter," said Jason Hofgartner, first author on the paper and a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada scholar at Cornell. "We'll want to take these conditions into consideration if we ever decide to explore the Titan surface some day."

Cassini's radar instrument will be able to test this model by watching what happens to the reflectivity of the surface of these lakes and seas. A hydrocarbon lake warming in the early spring thaw, as the northern lakes of Titan have begun to do, may become more reflective as ice rises to the surface. This would provide a rougher surface quality that reflects more radio energy back to Cassini, making it look brighter. As the weather turns warmer and the ice melts, the lake surface will be pure liquid, and will appear to the Cassini radar to darken.

 

"Cassini's extended stay in the Saturn system gives us an unprecedented opportunity to watch the effects of seasonal change at Titan," said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "We'll have an opportunity to see if the theories are right."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Black-Hole-Powered Planets Could Reach Speeds Matched Only by SubAtomic Particles

Black-Hole-Powered Planets Could Reach Speeds Matched Only by SubAtomic Particles | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
New research has found that hypervelocity planets may be flung to the outer reaches of the galaxy by black holes at speeds matched only by subatomic particles, traveling at 1.5 to 30 million miles per hour.

 

The finding builds on previous work on hypervelocity stars, which appear when a binary star system — two stars orbiting a central point — enter the gravitational well of a black hole, similar to the one at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The black hole tears the stars apart, sending one of the stars hurtling from the galaxy at very high speeds while the other remains within the gravitational field of the black hole.

 

Harvard's Avi Loeb, chair of the Harvard astronomy department, surmised that such planets could be seen through a telescope as “transits,” or traces, as they crossed a star’s light. He subsequently launched his collaboration with Dartmouth's Ginsburg to examine the possibility of such planets’ existence. 

“Once we realized that, it was clear to me that we could make a paper out of this,” Loeb said.Ginsburg and Loeb continued their collaborative research following Ginsburg’s move to Dartmouth to continue his studies. They developed computer simulations to explore the existence of hypervelocity planets, using facilities at both institutions, according to Ginsburg.

The simulations placed the planets orbiting the binary stars in a binary planet system. When subjected to the same pressures that form hypervelocity stars, the models revealed that the planets would be similarly ejected at high speeds, Ginsburg said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

Evidence indicates astronauts could survive on Mars

Evidence indicates astronauts could survive on Mars | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Radiation levels at the Martian surface appear to be roughly similar to those experienced by astronauts in low-Earth orbit, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has found.

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

First man on moon Neil Armstrong dead at 82: family

First man on moon Neil Armstrong dead at 82: family | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
(Reuters) - U.S.astronaut Neil Armstrong, who took a giant leap for mankind when he became the first person to walk on the moon, has died at the age of 82, his family said on Saturday.The family said...

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Passionate About Science and Technology!
Scoop.it!

Battle of the professors: Richard Dawkins branded a fundamentalist by expert behind the 'God particle'

Battle of the professors: Richard Dawkins branded a fundamentalist by expert behind the 'God particle' | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Professor Higgs - a potential Nobel-winner after experiments this year seemed to prove his theory - criticised atheist Dawkins (pictured) over the way he treats those who believe in God.

Via Olgy Gary
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

The Crisis in Higher Education - Technology Review

The Crisis in Higher Education - Technology Review | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Online versions of college courses are attracting hundreds of thousands of students, millions of dollars in funding, and accolades from university administrators. Is this a fad, or is higher education about to get the overhaul it needs?

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Who Should Make Sure Overseas Education Programs Are Worth Their Salt? - WorldWise - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Who Should Make Sure Overseas Education Programs Are Worth Their Salt? - WorldWise - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Making sure that cross-border higher-education efforts offer quality programs can be a conundrum. The problem is that quality assurance remains centered in nations and defined by political borders. There is no shortage of organizations and proposals to remedy this problem, as we were reminded by the recent announcement of a new International Quality Group sponsored by the U.S.-based Council for Higher Education Accreditation.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Has Higher Education Become an Engine of Inequality? - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Has Higher Education Become an Engine of Inequality? - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Education, long praised as the great equalizer, no longer seems to be performing as advertised. Why? We asked 10 experts to weigh in.

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, January 3, 2013 7:26 AM

It is only an issue of higher education? Definetly not. The main problem is that employment opportunities for the growing number of graduates have declined (both in terms of volume and quality). 

Rescooped by mdashf from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

2013: Internationalisation more than a numbers game

2013: Internationalisation more than a numbers game | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, January 6, 2013 4:56 AM

Hans sets the agenda for this year. 

Rescooped by mdashf from Science News
Scoop.it!

Martian rock from Sahara desert unlike others

Martian rock from Sahara desert unlike others | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
Scientists are abuzz about a coal-colored rock from Mars that landed in the Sahara desert: A yearlong analysis revealed it's quite different from other Martian meteorites. Not only is it older than most, it also contains more water.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Science News
Scoop.it!

Billions of Earthlike Planets Found in Milky Way

Billions of Earthlike Planets Found in Milky Way | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it
When you look up at a starry sky, nearly every star you see has a planetary system, astronomers announced today.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
mdashf's insight:

we may not be alone

more...
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

String Theory Helps To Explain Quantum Phases Of Matter

String Theory Helps To Explain Quantum Phases Of Matter | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

Newly discovered states of matter embody what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance.” They defy explanation, but lately answers have come from a seemingly unrelated corner of physics: string theory.

 

Matter can assume many forms other than solid, liquid and gas. The electrons that perfuse materials can undergo their own transitions, which involve inherently quantum properties of matter. Superconductors are the best-known example.These states of matter arise from an unimaginably complex web of quantum entanglement among the electrons—so complex that theorists studying these materials have been at a loss to describe them.

 

Some answers have come from an entirely separate line of study, string theory, typically the domain of cosmologists and high-energy particle theorists. On the face of it, string theory has nothing to say about the behavior of materials—no more than an atomic physicist can explain human society. And yet connections exist.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Testing Einstein's E=mc2 in outer space. Is inertial and gravitational mass exactly the same?

Testing Einstein's E=mc2 in outer space. Is inertial and gravitational mass exactly the same? | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

University of Arizona physicist Andrei Lebed has stirred the physics community with an intriguing idea yet to be tested experimentally: The world's most iconic equation, Albert Einstein's E=mc2, may be correct or not depending on where you are in space.

 

This was first demonstrated by Albert Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity and famously expressed in his iconic equation, E=mc2, where E stands for energy, m for mass and c for the speed of light (squared). Although physicists have since validated Einstein's equation in countless experiments and calculations, and many technologies including mobile phones and GPS navigation depend on it, University of Arizona physics professor Andrei Lebed has stirred the physics community by suggesting that E=mc2 may not hold up in certain circumstances.

 

The equivalence principle between the inertial and gravitational masses, introduced in classical physics by Galileo Galilei and in modern physics by Albert Einstein, has been confirmed with a very high level of accuracy. "But my calculations show that beyond a certain probability, there is a very small but real chance the equation breaks down for a gravitational mass," Lebed said.

 

If one measures the weight of quantum objects, such as a hydrogen atom, often enough, the result will be the same in the vast majority of cases, but a tiny portion of those measurements give a different reading, in apparent violation of E=mc2. This has physicists puzzled, but it could be explained if gravitational mass was not the same as inertial mass, which is a paradigm in physics.

 

"Most physicists disagree with this because they believe that gravitational mass exactly equals inertial mass," Lebed said. "But my point is that gravitational mass may not be equal to inertial mass due to some quantum effects in General Relativity, which is Einstein's theory of gravitation. To the best of my knowledge, nobody has ever proposed this before."

 

According to Einstein, gravitation is a result of a curvature in space itself. Think of a mattress on which several objects have been laid out, say, a ping pong ball, a baseball and a bowling ball. The ping pong ball will make no visible dent, the baseball will make a very small one and the bowling ball will sink into the foam. Stars and planets do the same thing to space. The larger an object's mass, the larger of a dent it will make into the fabric of space.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mdashf from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Astronomers Awed by Colossal Galaxy Outburst 10-Times Brighter than Largest Supernova

Astronomers Awed by Colossal Galaxy Outburst 10-Times Brighter than Largest Supernova | Science Communication from mdashf | Scoop.it

The scientists were conducting a long-term study of molecules in galaxies  when one of the galaxies showed a startling change. "The discovery was entirely serendipitous. Our observations were spread over a few years, and when we looked at them, we found that one galaxy had changed over that time from being placid and quiescent, to undergoing a hugely energetic outburst at the end," said Robert Minchin, of Arecibo Observatory.

 

The scientists were using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) 305-meter William E. GordonTelescope at Arecibo for their study when they discovered the outburst in NGC 660, a spiral galaxy 44 million light-years distant in the constellation Pisces. The outburst was ten times brighter than the largest supernova, or exploding star. They reported their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Long Beach, California.

After detecting the outburst, the team continued to observe NGC 660 with the Arecibo Telescope, and also sought to determine the cause of the outburst using an international network of telescopes to make a detailed image of the galaxy.

 

"High-resolution imaging is the key to understanding what's going on," said Emmanuel Momjian, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "We needed to know if the outburst came from a supernova in this galaxy or from the galaxy's core. We could only do that by harnessing the high-resolution imaging power we get by joining widely-separated radio telescopes together."

 

The astronomers used a network called the High Sensitivity Array (HSA), composed of the NSF'sVery Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide system of ten radio telescopes ranging from Hawaii to the Virgin islands; the Arecibo Telescope; the NSF's 100-meter Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia; and the 100-meter Effelsberg Radio Telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.